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KING GEORGE IV | The greatest royal collector of art
Tuesday 31 October 2017 | 2.00 pm to 3.30 pm

George IV was the single greatest Royal collector of art and instigator of architectural projects. He was passionately fond of lavish decoration and display. As Prince of Wales, he refurbished Carlton House in London; and built Brighton Pavilion. As King, he converted Buckingham House into Buckingham Palace; and made huge changes to Windsor Castle. 

He furnished his palaces magnificently with French furniture, clocks, porcelain and sculpture. He was an avid collector of Dutch and Flemish paintings, including works by Rembrandt, Rubens and van Dyck. He patronised contemporary artists such as Reynolds, Gainsborough, Lawrence and Stubbs; and the sculptors Canova and Chantrey. He assembled the greatest collection of Sevres porcelain in the world; and a huge amount of historic and contemporary silver and gold objects.

King George IV - on the occasion of his Coronation
Sir Thomas Lawrence (English, 1769-1830), George IV (1762-1830), 1821, The Royal Collection, England, RCIN 405918, Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2017 | Public Domain

QUEEN VICTORIA & PRINCE ALBERT | Patrons of the arts and art collectors
Wednesday 1 November 2017 | 2.00 pm to 3.30 pm

Victoria and Albert were enthusiastic patrons of the arts throughout their marriage, commissioning and collecting works from both British and European artists. These included Old Master paintings, sculpture, furniture, jewellery and fine bindings. Victoria and Albert were as passionate about art as they were about each other. They viewed their roles as patrons of the arts as being part of the public duties of the monarchy. Buckingham Palace was known as ‘the headquarters of taste’. 

They also made important changes at Windsor Castle and added three other distinctive royal residences, Balmoral Castle, Osborne House and Sandringham House. They played a pivotal role with the ground breaking Great Exhibition of 1851, and were important patrons of early photography. 

This lecture also challenges the popular image of Victoria as a melancholy widow and reveals her as a passionate and open-minded woman.

Franz Xaver Winterhalter (German, 1805-1873), Queen Victoria (age 23), 1842, The Royal Collection, England, RCIN 406010, Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2017 | Public Domain

Lectures & Workshops Archive

THE EUGENE BARILO VON REISBERG SERIES:

Whatever you do, you must not look at Her Majesty

To coincide with the launch of the forthcoming film Victoria & Abdul starring Dame Judy Dench, slated for release in Australia on 22 September 2017, join Eugene Barilo von Reisberg as he introduces you to of some of the most famous 19th century portraits that look at Queen Victoria.

Discover how the portraits of Queen Victoria reflect the social changes of this fast-paced epoch, and how the artists of the era adapted the genre of portraiture to changing demands and divergent artists and royal demand.

Drawn from public museums, royal palaces, and private collections from around the world you will discover prominent portrait painters who captured Queen Victoria in her copious royal commissions.

Gain glimpses into the fascinating lives of the gifted artists and the colourful personality of Her Majesty; learn the secret language of portraiture; and uncover the covert messages shared between the portraits and the viewers.

PORTRAITURE AS CONTACT: Official Representations of British Monarchy Abroad
Wednesday 18 October 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

Official portraits of Queen Victoria were the first point of contact between the monarch and the millions of her culturally and religiously diverse subjects. As an allegorical embodiment of the British Empire, they also became one of the veritable cornerstones of national identity.

The lecture examines the complex iconography of official royal portraiture and investigates the procedures underpinning the dissemination and distribution of royal images, which came to play an important part in Queen Victoria’s performance of her royal duties and in the continued visibility of the British Monarchy.


image: Portrait of Queen Victoria (1819-1901), by Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-73), 1843, oil on canvas, Collection of HM Queen Elizabeth II (RCIN 404388).


DR EUGENE BARILO VON REISBERG is a Melbourne-based lecturer, researcher, and art consultant.  He has completed a doctoral dissertation on Franz Xaver Winterhalter, the 19th century elite portrait specialist, at the University of Melbourne, and lectures and publishes widely on 19th century art, history, and culture. He has presented lectures at The Johnston Collection since 2011.

 

 

LEOPARDS & OTHER WILD CREATURES | Fancy dressing with Margot Riley 
Thursday 14 September 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

Leopard is the most ubiquitous of the ‘big-cat’ animal prints, and the label generally applied to all creatures great and spotty including the ocelot, cheetah, and jaguar. What nature created as camouflage for wild beasts moving through the jungle’s dappled light, designers soon tamed into submission for their own patterning purposes. While the urge to surround ourselves with animal print may stem from a nostalgia for more primitive times when humans were hunters, it is in the versatility of their motifs – mimicking the distinctive natural markings of exotic species symbolic of wealth and status – that the key to their longevity lies. This talk offers a sartorial walk on the wild side.

MARGOT RILEY is a cultural historian with special interest in textiles and dress. From 1992-1994, she completed the Masters in Museum Studies Program at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York and, since her return to Australia, has been working as a Curator with the collections of the State Library of New South Wales in Sydney. Her most recent talk at The Johnston Collection was DREAMING OF THE DEPARTED: Australian mourning portraits in 2016.

This lecture is generously supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection.

image: The Swiss Photographic Studios, Sydney Dulcie Deamer in leopard skin costume [worn to the Artists Ball], Sydney, 1923 sepia toned silver gelatin photoprint courtesy of Mitchell Library, State Library of NSW, Sydney (PXA 1609) image supplied and used with permission

WINTERHALTER'S THE ROYAL FAMILY, 1846
Wednesday 11 October 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

Join Dr Eugene Barilo von Reisberg as he unravels fiction and reality and examines the confluence of genuine parental pride and exemplary monarchic propaganda behind one of the most iconic nineteenth-century portraits by the celebrated court painter Franz Xaver Winterhalter representing Queen Victoria, Prince Albert, and their five eldest children.

image: Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-1873), The Royal Family in 1846, The Royal Collection, England, RCIN 405413, Royal Collection Trust/ © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2017 | Public Domain

BY POPULAR DEMAND | QUEEN VICTORIA'S MAHARAJAH: Indian Presence at Queen Victoria's Court
Wednesday 4 October 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

Fascinated by one of Franz Xaver Winterhalter’s most exotic paintings, Portrait of Maharajah Duleep Singh, Barilo von Reisberg delves into the sitter’s biography and uncoveres a fascinating tale of an Indian child prince; the legend of the fabled Koh-i-Noor diamond, one of the most important jewels in the British Royal Collection; and the Indian presence at the court of Queen Victoria, the first British monarch to be formally styled the Empress of India.

image: Portrait of Duleep Singh, Maharajah of Lahore (1837-93), by Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-73), 1854, oil on canvas, Collection of HM Queen Elizabeth II (RCIN 403843)

PAWS & PORTRAITS | Animals in Art with Katherine Kovacic
Wednesday 30 August 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

When humankind first began painting on cave walls, we chose to depict animals. Since then, animals of all species have been an integral part of art, but none more so than our beloved domestic animals: dogs, horses, cats and birds. 

This lecture will consider animals in art from a variety of perspectives, including dogs as symbols, the significance of the human-animal bond, and audience response to animals in portraiture.

KATHERINE KOVACIC is an independent researcher with special interests in animal behaviour, the role of animals in art and representations of the human-animal bond. She has an Honours degree in Veterinary Science, and a Master of Arts and PhD in Art History.

image: Harold Septimus Power (New Zealand-born Australian, 1877-1951)
Rough Collie, England, circa 1920, oil (sketch) on canvas, private collection, image supplied and used with permission

LEARN | PRETTY WILD STUDY SERIES

Presented by well-known art, social and cultural historians, the PRETTY WILD Study Series will reflect on the theme of animals while exploring the artistic, social and cultural worlds where objects, interiors and design meet. 

This series of lectures and events will also consider how historical and contemporary ideas connect and convey meanings that celebrate culture in the making

EXQUISITE CREATURES | Raised threads and mythical beasts with Alison Cole
Wednesday 13 September 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

For centuries, the making of embroidered samplers was part of a young girl’s education – covering not only needlework but also religion, morals and sometimes politics. Seventeenth century stumpwork embroidered mirrors, pictures, caskets and boxes featured a large array of both real and fantastic creatures.

In this illustrated presentation, Alison Cole will look at the history of stumpwork, the stories behind the embroideries, the women that embroidered them and the common elements within the designs.

ALISON COLE has been embroidering for over 30 years, but has always been around embroidery from a very young age. She is the author of four books (All That Glitters, The Midas Touch, The Stumpwork Masterclass and The Embroiderer’s Little Book of Hints and Tips) and has also been the recipient of The Embroiderers Guild (Victoria) Branch Scholarship along with the prestigious Ethel Oates Scholarship, of which she used part to research the history of metal thread embroidery.

Over the years, Alison has won many awards and prizes for her needlework. She has researched and taught in many countries to the stage where she is a true expert in her field. Cole has previously spoken at The Johnston Collection on WRAPPED IN SILK & GOLD: A History of Stumpwork in 2010.

image: Alison Cole, Gryphon, Melbourne, 2010, Stumpwork, image supplied and used with permission

ANIMAL MENAGERIE | Animals in Jewellery with Adrian Dickens
Wednesday 6 September 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

Think of an animal ... think of a jeweller ... then think of the wearer; a screen star, a member of royalty, an international stateswoman, a fashion designer, a celebrity. 

In a world where beauty and adornment are so completely intertwined,A Menagerie of Jewels is the sixth talk in the Circa AD repertoire; and has been specifically researched and written to coincide with the current ANIMAL KINGDOM exhibition at the Collection.

Some are beautiful, some not so, some are macabre and some will amuse, many have meaning and a few send a message particularly when worn, but above all they are jewels that recognise the talents of some of the world's most famous jewellers including Van Cleef and Arpel, Rene Lalique, Cartier, Harry Winston and in particular JAR

A 50-minute fully illustrated presentation on the history and stories behind some of the world's most wearable ‘animals’!

ADRIAN DICKENS trained in the United Kingdom for six years and has been a fixture on the Melbourne and Sydney fine jewellery scene for over 30 years. Adrian’s knowledge of historical and recent jewellery trends are insightful. 

He regularly gives talks and presentations nationally and internationally. He has managed some of Australia’s fine jewellery houses and now runs Circa AD Jewels. His most recent lecture at The Johnston Collection was DIANA, PRINCESS OF WALES | The Jewels of a modern day Princess.

caption:Jean Larivière (French, 1940 - )
campaign for Cartier (avec Panthére), Paris, France, circa 1950

LEARN | EXCLUSIVE MASTERCLASS

THE FRENCH REFLECT ON THE NEW WORLD: Prize-winning contests and the Americas in French Académies in the 18th century with Bertrand Van Ruymbeke 
Tuesday 29 August 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

Prize-winning contests (concours) offered by the Académies were immensely popular in 18th century France as several hundreds were organised, drawing thousands of memoirs over the course of the century. These essay contests bore on a wide range of topics in science, agriculture, urbanism, history, law, medicine, commerce, gambling, fashion and geography, as well as a myriad of regional issues.

This show and tell explores contests related to the Atlantic World whether on slavery, the New World, the American Revolution, colonisation, navigation or trade.

Bertrand Van Ruymbeke will present examples of those contests in a general way and then focus on one or two bearing on the discovery of the New World and slavery including the history of the Saint-Domingue (now the Republic of Haiti).

The liberation, by Toussaint L'Ouverture and his army looms large, as of Saint-Domingue was the most important French slave-based colony for France at the time. In this presentation we will also learn how the events in Saint-Domingue terrified British plantation owners in the West Indies, with a real fear that what had happened in Saint-Domingue could happen in British Colonies.

BERTRAND VAN RUYMBEKE is Professor of American History, Université de Paris 8 (University of Vincennes in Saint-Denis), France. He taught for a long time in the Department of History of the University of Charleston in South Carolina. Van Ruymbeke is the co-founder of the Journal of Early American History published by Brill in the Netherlands. In 2015 he became a senior member of the Institut Universitaire de France.

He is currently working on a research project relating to the French academies in the 18th century and on what people wrote about when they described the New World and the Pacific. 

Anne-Louis Girodet De Roucy-Trioson (French, 1767 – 1824) Portrait of Jean-Baptiste Belley, Deputy for Saint-Domingue (with a bust of Raynal), 1797, collection of Palace of Versailles, France | Public Domain

STRAY | On the Kindness of Animals with Barbara Creed
Wednesday 16 August 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

"In The Winter’s Tale (1623) Shakespeare speaks of the kindness of animals who took in and nursed the ‘poor babe’, the abandoned human stray. In the Anthropocene all species are threatened with loss of a hearth, home, nest, forest, burrow, water, wilderness, plot of ground, a place where living things can settle and flourish - that essential thing the human species once used in order to define itself as ‘human’ and ‘civilised’. The ‘poor babe’ of the twenty-first century will need more than the kindness of others. Not only are the members of all species threatened with the loss of a home or habitat, the earth herself is at risk."
Barbara Creed

This timely lecture explores the relationship between human and animal in the context of the stray. Working through examples from the visual arts, film and literature, with reference to prominent writers and philosophers, Creed introduces the concept of the stray and in so doing lays bare the astonishing contradictions at the heart of our current condition.

BARBARA CREED is a Redmond Barry Distinguished Professor at the University of Melbourne and an Honorary Professorial Fellow.  Creed’s recent research is on animal studies, the inhuman and social justice issues. She is presently on the editorial advisory boards of Cultural Studies Review, eTropic and the Animal Studies Journal and on the boards of the international book series, Anthem and Animal Publics. 

In 2006 she was elected to the Australian Academy of the Humanities and is currently the director of the Human Rights and Animal Ethics Research Network (HRAE) at the University of Melbourne. Her latest publication is Stray: Human–Animal Ethics in the Anthropocene (2017).

image: Sir Edwin Henry Landseer's A distinguished member of the Humane Society (1831), which depicts a stray dog called 'Bob', a Newfoundland, who was rewarded with this title for saving 23 people from drowning in the sea at the London waterfront where he set up his 'home' on the sea wall. His honorary title earned him a medal and a daily meal!

Sir Edwin Henry Landseer (English, 1802–1873), A Distinguished Member of the Humane Society, 1831 (exhibited 1838), oil paint on canvas | 1118 × 1435 mm, collection of the Tate Collection, London, N01226, bequeathed by Newman Smith, 1887, image used with permission under Public Domain

THE LION, THE LAMB AND THE WHATCHAMACALLIT with Sophia Errey
Wednesday 2 August 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

And the lion shall lie down with the lamb
Isaiah 11:6

Beloved by artists for their rich symbolic significance and physical characteristics, these two beasts have been used in all media for thousands of years. But sometimes real animals are apparently not dramatic enough, and so we have “zoomorphs” – invented creatures often combining the features of multiple animals. Here we will explore a little of the range – from charming to terrifying – that these plays on the animal world can evoke.

SOPHIA ERREY is an artist, art educator and writer. She has lectured widely in the visual arts both historical and contemporary including developing and teaching a course on studio practice across design disciplines. Her most recent lecture at The Johnston Collection was AT TABLE 

image: Edward Hicks (American, 1780 – 1849)
(detail from) Peaceable Kingdom, circa 1834 oil on canvas
collection of the National Gallery of Art, Washington DC, 1980.62.15, gift of Edgar William and Bernice Chrysler Garbisch | image used with permission under Public Domain

WEARING SKINS | Fashion & the animal kingdom with Paola Di Trocchio
Thursday 13 July 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

Animal skins were one of man’s earliest sartorial statements, draped over the body for protection and adornment. 

At first a symbol of primitivism, by the Middle Ages aristocrats and royalty were flaunting their wealth and status by donning expansive fur cloaks over their high-fashion garments. 

Join us for this lecture which will explore the various associations of ‘wearing skin’ across fashion and time.

PAOLA DI TROCCHIO is Curator, Fashion and Textiles at the NGV, Melbourne. She has curated numerous exhibitions that have recently included 200 Years of Australian Fashion and Italian Jewels:  Bulgari Style. Her most recent lecture at the Collection was Haute Couture Houses as part of the VAMFF 2017 Arts Program.

image Tintoretto (Jacopo Comin, Italian 1518 – 1594) Doge Pietro Loredano, circa 1567-1570 oil on canvas
collection of National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 3677, Felton Bequest, 1928, image used with permission

ANIMALS IN EARLY MODERN LANDSCAPE DESIGN with Luke Morgan
Tuesday 11 July 2017 | 10am-11.30am

This lecture will consider the role of animals in early modern landscape design. Particular attention will be paid to the representation of real and invented animals within the Renaissance garden.

LUKE MORGAN is Associate Professor of Art History & Theory at Monash University. His books include The Monster in the Garden: The Grotesque the Gigantic in Renaissance Landscape Design (2015) and Nature as Model: Salomon de Caus and Early Seventeenth-Century Landscape Design (2007), both published by the University of Pennsylvania Press. 

His current research, which focuses on the theme of enchantment in early modern landscape experience, is funded by the Australian Research Council. His most recent lecture at The Johnston Collection was NATURE AS MODEL: The Italian Renaissance Garden (2016).

image: figures of the ‘Lions’ in the Sacro Bosco (Sacred Grove), colloquially Parco dei Mostri (Park of the Monsters) or the Garden of Bomarzo, Bomarzo, Italy, late 16th century, image supplied

MELBOURNE STORIES

PICTURING MELBOURNE: the new Golden Age of illustrating Melbourne with Melinda Clarke, Deborah Young and Lewis Brownlie
Tuesday 5 September 2017 | | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

Pictorial maps have been used and admired since the first medieval cartographer put pen to paper depicting mountains and trees across countries, people and objects around margins, and sea monsters in oceans.

You may have seen AC Cooke & Samuel Calvert’s 1880 illustration of Melbourne, and if you were around in the 1990’s it’s likely you remember The Melbourne Map, inspired by that first etching and produced by two young Melburnians, Melinda Clarke & Deborah Young.

Over the past 27 years there have been incredible changes to Melbourne’s landscape for example Docklands, Southern Cross Station, Melbourne Star, Eureka Tower, Melbourne Sports & Entertainment arenas, Birrarung Marr, Crown and Southbank developments, Federation Square, Bolte Bridge, Melbourne Museum to name just a few.

Join Melinda Clarke, Deborah Young and Lewis Brownlie as they describe the journey of mapping in the digital age, and the joy of discovering and documenting Melbourne all over again.

MELINDA CLARKE is the driving force behind the Melbourne Map published in 1990. She’s now on a quest to bring the enormously popular image back to life including all the new infrastructure, buildings, sporting arenas, parks and add a few more suburbs to the drawing. 

DEBORAH YOUNG is an artist and garden designer who first joined the team in 1987. She designed and drew the original character line drawing for the first edition – The Magic Melbourne Map. This historic view of Melbourne is held in the State and National Library archives, Historical Society records and adorns the walls of many a home and business around Melbourne and indeed the globe. 

LEWIS BROWNLIE is a new recruit. He has spent the last couple of years drawing Melbourne, one building at a time, attracted to the older colonial feel of his own past. Usually making artworks on location from direct observation - he finds this the most fulfilling method of capturing the feel of a place. He produced a colouring book of the city of Melbourne and more recently a colouring book of Fitzroy Gardens & Cooks Cottage – and a portrait of Fairhall and William Johnston’s cup for The Johnston Collection.

image:detail from the Melbourne Map, 2017

PIONEERS OF PORTRAITURE: Propriety and Prosperity in Mary Beale’s Portrait Practice with Lisa Mansfield
Tuesday 19 September 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

Mary Beale’s commercial success as one of the most accomplished portrait painters working in 17th century Britain, attests her powers of observation, social graces, and uncommonly equal partnership with her husband in marriage and business. 

In examining her innovative approach to the representation of gender, this lecture will explore her conscious self-promotion as a woman artist within an illustrious lineage of female pioneers of portraiture extending back to the Renaissance.

LISA MANSFIELD is an art historian originally from Melbourne. Her doctoral dissertation examined the portraits of the French Renaissance King, Francis I (reign 1515-1547), which formed the basis for her book, Representations of Renaissance Monarchy: Francis I and the image-makers, 2016.

Lisa's core area of research investigates the political and psychological mechanics and communicative power of the face and body, particularly in Northern Renaissance traditions of portraiture. Additional research interests that inform Lisa's teaching practice include the construction of image and identity in virtual worlds (avatar creation in Second Life), and art censorship and iconoclasm in past and present historical contexts. 

Lisa completed her Ph.D. Art History at the University of Melbourne in 2005, where she was a tutor and guest lecturer from 1998 to 2005. In mid-2008 Lisa joined the Department of Art History, University of Adelaide, and teaches a range of courses in European art history. She recently presented a paper on Francis I, at the Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage in Brussels, and has lectured and published widely.


image: Mary Beale, (English, 1632/3-1699), Self-Portrait of Mary Beale with Her Husband and Son, circa 1660, oil on canvas, 602 x 740 mm, collection of The Geffrye, Museum of the Home, London, 49/1978, purchased with the assistance of the Victoria & Albert Museum Purchase Grant Fund and the Art Fund, 1978, image used with permission under Public Domain

DIANA, PRINCESS OF WALES | The Jewels of a modern day Princess with Adrian Dickens 

Tuesday 25 July 2017 10.00 am to 11.30 am

It seems hard to believe that 2017 is the 20th anniversary of the tragic death of Diana, Princess of Wales.

With an eye for style and fashion, this talk concentrates on many of the stunning jewels that Diana wore, which together with her clothes made her one of the most iconic, stylish and photographed Princesses of the 20th century. Whether modern, antique or even costume jewellery; Diana had a knack for creating beautiful and trendsetting looks that even today no other member of a Royal Family have come even close to.

Learn how a necklace made for Queen Mary to wear at the Delhi Durbar became a bandeau worn in Melbourne, Australia. See how a costume jewellery snake brooch became a striking addition to Diana’s “faux” jewellery collection. Discover how a simple brooch became an integral part of the “Spencer Diamond Tiara.”

Adrian Dickens will take you into a world of jewels worn like no other Royal.

ADRIAN DICKENS trained in the United Kingdom for six years and has been a fixture on the Melbourne and Sydney fine jewellery scene for over 30 years. Adrian’s knowledge of historical and recent jewellery trends are insightful. 

He regularly gives talks and presentations nationally and internationally. He has managed some of Australia’s fine jewellery houses and now runs Circa AD Jewels. His most recent lecture at The Johnston Collection was Elizabeth Taylor’s Greatest Love Affair – With Jewels.

Terence Daniel Donovan (English, 1936-1996) Diana, Princess of Wales (1961-1997), 1990
colour print | 301 x 203 mm, collection of the National Portrait Gallery, London, NPG P716(13)
given by the photographer's widow, Diana Donovan, 1998 © The Terence Donovan Archive

LEARN | JANE AUSTEN 200

2017 will mark the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen’s death on 18 July 1817. To commemorate this significant event, we continue our year-long programme of conversations celebrating and honoring Jane’s creativity and talent. 

RECONSTRUCTING JANE AUSTEN’S SILK PELISSE with Hilary Davidson
Wednesday 26 July 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

This lecture examines a silk pelisse, a kind of coat, dated circa 1812–1814, the only known garment associated with Jane Austen (1775–1817), now held by Hampshire Cultural Trust. 

Hilary Davidson took an exact pattern of the pelisse and then made replica garments as a form of investigating such an important author in a new way. She tried to answer questions such as did the pelisse belong to Austen? Who made it? What did it cost? And what can be gleaned from the garment compared with period information about Austen’s appearance?

The talk explores findings about Austen and her world gathered from looking at the material past in a highly detailed way. Questions and insights arising from the process of reproduction are discussed, and the pelisse is compared to other surviving garments, and to contemporary fashionable images. 

HILARY DAVIDSON is a dress and textile historian who was formerly curator of fashion and decorative art at the Museum of London. She has researched Austen-age fashion for a decade and is currently completing a major book on dress in the British Regency world for Yale (2018). Her most recent lecture at The Johnston Collection was Dress in the age of Jane Austen (2017).

2017 will mark the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen’s death on 18 July 1817, and this conversation is part of our contribution to the celebration Jane’s creativity and talent.

This lecture is supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection.

image: replica of a silk pelisse once belonging to Jane Austen, made by Hilary Davidson, 2011

JANE AUSTEN (1775-1817) | The Last Letters with Lise Rodgers
Tuesday 18 July 2017 | 2.00 pm to 3.30 pm

I have lost a treasure, such a Sister, such a friend as never can have been surpassed,- She was the sun of my life, the gilder of every pleasure, the soother of every sorrow, I had not a thought concealed from her, & it is as if I had lost a part of myself …”
Cassandra Austen to Fanny Knight, 20 July 1817

Throughout her life, Jane Austen was a prolific writer of letters – to her family, friends and acquaintances. Sharing the minutiae of her everyday life, her thoughts and opinions, her wit and her humour.

It seems appropriate on this significant date, exactly 200 years since her passing, to allow Jane to speak of the last few months of her life in Jane’s own words.

LISE RODGERS is an accomplished Melbourne actress whose career has spanned stage, screen and radio. An interest in the world and characters of Jane Austen and a fascination with her letters, is the inspiration behind her series of ‘Jane’ performances. Her most recent presentation at the Collection was “MY EMMA”.

THE GREATNESS OF PERSUASION with John Wiltshire
Thursday 22 June 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

After Pride and Prejudice, Persuasion is probably Jane Austen’s most popular novel.  In this talk John Wiltshire will suggest some of the ways in which it is also her greatest. 

RE-WRITING PERSUASION with John Wiltshire
Thursday 29 June 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

Persuasion is the only novel of Jane Austen of which a draft of some chapters – the final ones – survives.  Why did Jane Austen re-write the climax of her story, and what does this tell us about her art? 

JOHN WILTSHIRE is Emeritus Professor at La Trobe University. He is the author of numerous books about Jane Austen, and has edited Mansfield Park for the authoritative Cambridge edition. His most recent publications are The Cinematic Jane Austen (2009) and The Making of Dr Johnson (2009) and Hidden Jane Austen (2015). He is currently preparing a work on Frances Burney and medical experience. John has been a regular lecturer at The Johnston Collection since 2008.

frontispiece from Northanger Abbey and Persuasion, published by John Murray, London, 1815

“MORE ENGLISH THAN THE ENGLISH” | 3 Treasure House Libraries: Waddesdon Manor, Anglesey Abbey & Wormsley House with Shane Carmody
Tuesday 20 June 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

For the aristocracy and the gentry the English country house was the proof of social status.  Often palatial in scale these great houses were decorated with extraordinary collections of art and antiquities.  Many also had great libraries. For outsiders wishing to join this elite a country house was a must and in this lecture Shane Carmody will tell the stories of Baron Ferdinand Rothschild; Huttleston Rogers, First Baron Fairhaven; and Sir Paul Getty, the libraries they created and some of the extraordinary books that they contain.

SHANE CARMODY is a historian with a great love of Libraries and Archives.  He has worked for the National Archives as State Director for Victoria, the State Library of Victoria as Director Collections and Access and is currently at the University of Melbourne Library as Senior Development Manager.

He is widely published on the history of Libraries and collections.  Shane has managed major international exhibitions including The Medieval Imagination: Illuminated Manuscripts from Cambridge, Australia and New Zealand (State Library of Victoria 2008) and Love and Devotion: From Persia and beyond (State Library of Victoria 2012). Each year he leads a tour of the Great Libraries of England with Australians Studying Abroad.

Image:The Library at Anglesey Abbeyimage supplied and used with permission

A PRINCESS FOR SCOTLAND: Marie Duchess of Hamilton with Eugene Barilo von Reisberg 
Tuesday 30 May 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am 

Her birth spelled the end of a German princely dynasty; her marriage resulted in the partial loss of her social position; the wayward lives of her children ended the long line of Scottish dukes and ultimately led to the dispersal of family fortunes. The lecture traces the highs and lows in the life and times of Marie, Princess of Baden, Duchess of Hamilton. 

EUGENE BARILO VON REISBERG is a Melbourne-based lecturer, researcher, and art consultant.  He has completed a doctoral dissertation on Franz Xaver Winterhalter, the 19th century elite portrait specialist, at the University of Melbourne, and lectures and publishes widely on 19th century art, history, and culture.

See also the Eugene Barilo von Reisberg Study Series NAPOLEON'S CHILDREN

image caption: Richard Buckner (English, 1812-83), Marie Duchess of Hamilton (1818-88), with her son, Lord William Douglas-Hamilton (1845-1895), oil on canvas, Private Collection

HOW MUCH COLOUR IS THERE IN YOUR LIFE? with Ian George 
Thursday 25 May 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am 

Where do colours come from and how do they get their names? What was the “Venetian secret” of the 18th century? Were the Impressionists more than seekers after transitory sensations-to what extent were they exploring the optical science of perception according to the colour theories of Michel Eugène Chevreul (1786-1889)? Do artist’s select their colours or do the colours choose themselves as Matisse suggests?

Ian George helps us look at recent studies showing us how observant (or unobservant) we are: what are our favourite colours and why: where our colours come from: and asking how much colour there is in our lives

DR IAN GEORGE AO has been an art critic and historian since the 1960's. His postgraduate work was in aesthetics. Since then he has served on the Visual Arts Committee of the Festival of Perth, as a Trustee of the Queensland Art Gallery and Vice-President of the Queensland Festival, had two terms on the Community Arts Board of the Australia Council and is a regular lecturer at the National Gallery of Australia, the Art Gallery of SA and the National Gallery of Victoria. 

image caption: Michel Eugène Chevreul (French, 1786-1889), Colour wheel, Paris, 1861 (Public Domain)

COLOURING THE CARIBBEAN| representing a new world with Trevor Burnard
Tuesday 23 May 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am 

When the English ventured overseas in the late 16th  and early 17th centuries, they established a variety of colonial settlements that, especially in the 17th century, were bewildering in their political and social diversity.

Artists, writers and historians recorded these new lands, people and places so as to see English settlement as an encounter with peoples, alongside the representations of the effects colonisation, endeavour and enterprise.

This lecture will revisit plantations in the Americas, consider the Haitian Revolution and other representations of African in European art, as well considering works held in The Johnston Collection.

TREVOR BURNARD is professor and head of the School of Historical and Philosophical Studies at the University of Melbourne. He is the author of Mastery, Tyranny, and Desire and Creole Gentlemen, as well as coeditor of The Routledge History of Slavery.

after Agostino Brunias (1728 - 1796) (Italian, active in Britain (1758-1770; 1777-1780s))
The Linen Market at St Domingo engraved print on paper published by John P. Thompson (London), 6 October 1804 (Creative Commons)

MELBOURNE STORIES 

DRESSING FOR THE CAMERA: photography and the colonial portrait with Laura Jocic 
Wednesday 17 May 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am  

The invention of photography allowed a wide range of people, who previously could not afford to commission a painter, to have their portraits taken. Surviving images of 19th century Australian settlers provide an insight into changing styles of dress and the nuances in the way garments and accessories were worn. Dressed for the camera, many of these portraits also unlock stories of emigration and the role photography played in maintaining ties with families who had been divided through emigration. 

LAURA JOCIC is undertaking a PhD at the University of Melbourne, researching dress and its role in Australian colonial society. She was formerly a curator in the department of Australian Fashion and Textiles at the National Gallery of Victoria where she curated a number of exhibitions including Australian Made: 100 Years of Fashion. In 2016 Laura curated the exhibition LOUIS KAHAN: art, theatre, fashion for the Town Hall Gallery, Hawthorn. 

image caption: Paterson Bros., Melbourne (photographer), Young woman wearing a crinoline, circa 1862, albumen print, Private collection

THE EUGENE BARILO VON REISBERG STUDY SERIES

NAPOLEON'S CHILDREN

EUGENE BARILO VON REISBERG is a Melbourne-based lecturer, researcher, and art consultant.  He has completed a doctoral dissertation on Franz Xaver Winterhalter, the 19th century elite portrait specialist, at the University of Melbourne, and lectures and publishes widely on 19th century art, history, and culture.


PART I | THE ADOPTED - Eugene, Duke of Leuchtenberg; Hortense, Queen of Holland; and Stephanie, Grand Duchess of Baden;
Tuesday 2 May 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

Upon proclaiming himself Emperor, Napoleon wanted desperately to ally himself with the reigning dynasties of Europe. The lack of unmarried siblings did not stop him. After placing his brothers and sisters on the thrones of conquered nations, he formally adopted Eugène, Hortense, and Stéphanie de Beauharnais - the children and a niece of his wife, Empress Josephine - to use them as pawns in his Game of Thrones.

image caption: Jean-Baptiste Isabey (French, 1767-1855), Portrait of Hortense, Queen of Holland (1783-1837), 1813, watercolor on cardboard | 130 × 95 mm, collection of the Musée National du Château de Malmaison (Creative Commons)

 

PART II | THE LEGITIMATE - the King of Rome (also will talk about Empress Marie-Louise Napoleon's little-known second wife)
Tuesday 9 May 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

Napoleon’s second marriage in 1810 to the Archduchess Marie Louise, daughter of the Emperor Franz I of Austria, satisfied his ultimate ambition - to ally himself with a reigning European dynasty. His longing to establish his own dynasty was realised when the new Empress was delivered of a son. However, Napoleon’s relentless military ambition soon led to his downfall which turned his trophy wife and the cherished child into fugitives.

image caption: 

PART III | THE BASTARDS - Princesse de Chimay, Comte Walewski, Comte de Leon ... and assorted others.
Tuesday 16 May 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

Napoleon’s alleged sexual conquests were said to rival his military achievements, and throughout the 19th century there was no shortage of those who proudly claimed their descent from the Emperor. The lecture focuses on three of the people with the most reputable claim to Napoleon’s DNA - Charles Leon, Alexandre Walewski, and Emilie Pellapra.

image caption: Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-73), Portrait of Emilie, Princesse de Chimay (1808-71), 1849, oil on canvas, private collection, (Creative Commons)

THE SYLVIA SAGONA STUDY SERIES

GREAT COLLECTIONS OF VENICE AND ROME

This series will investigate the ideas behind collecting in 17th and 18th century Italy and their political and cultural influence on the English aristocracy undertaking the Grand Tour.

SYLVIA SAGONA is an internationally recognised specialist on 19th century French society. She retired from the French Department at The University of Melbourne to work on historical documentaries for French and Australian television and is currently researching a book on the invention of the restaurant in Paris in the 18th century.

Lecture 1 | THE ENGLISH OF THE 18th CENTURY GRAND TOUR: The politics of display
Thursday 27 April 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

In the 18th century the Grand Tour became a rite of passage for young English Protestant aristocrats destined to assume their rightful place in government with an increased appreciation of the solidity and uprightness of English institutions. The art they brought back testified to refinement as well as familiarity with the decadence and sensuality of Catholic Europe. Portraits encoded reference to the sitter as inheritor of the wisdom of ancient Rome and survivor of the sinful vices of Venice. Canaletto's veduta would fill private collections as testimony that taste was not just a virtue but a duty to one's country.

image caption: Johan Zoffany (German, 1733 –1810), The Tribuna of the Uffizi, 1772-8, Royal Collection RCIN 406983

Lecture 2 | THE BORGHESE COLLECTION, ROME |"An Elysium of Delight"
Thursday 4 May 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

Cardinal Scipio Borghese, used the immense wealth and influence he wielded as Papal Nephew in 17th century Rome to assemble one of the largest and most impressive private collections in Europe. Based on the idea of the teatrum mundi, he placed prize pieces from the ancient world next to contemporary art by Caravaggio, Raphael and Titian in order to stimulate conversation and reflection on art and life. Although a ruthless collector who would seize works commissioned for churches and other patrons, it was his keen eye which first recognised the talent of Gian Lorenzo Bernini whose masterpieces are still on display in the magnificent villa surrounded by landscaped gardens.

image caption: Gian Lorenzo Bernini (Italian, 1598 – 1680), David, 1623–24, Galleria Borghese, Rome

Lecture 3 | THE CA REZZONICO COLLECTION IN VENICE | The last glory days of the Serenissima
Thursday 11 May 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

The Ca Rezzonico on the Grand Canal, dedicated to exploring 18th century Venice, is one of the lesser known museums of the city offering a glimpse behind the scenes of life in Venice's great days. The chequered history of the Ca Rezzonico, passing from hand to hand as families grew wealthy then fell from power, is a micro history of Venice itself.

The Rezzonico bought their way into the aristocracy and commissioned Tiepolo and Guarana to create ceiling frescos and trompe l'oeil decorations for their magnificent reception rooms and chapel. By the 19th century the palazzo was home to Robert Browning and Singer Sargent before an eccentric Count went bankrupt adding to the lush furnishings and art collection. It now houses entire rooms salvaged from distressed Venetian palazzi that have crumbled beyond repair.

image caption: Canaletto (Giovanni Antonio Canal), (Italy, 1697 – 1768), The Return of the Bucintoro to the Molo on Ascension Day, 1732, The Royal Collection, England, RCIN 404417

HAUTE COUTURE HOUSES with Paola Di Trocchio
Wednesday 3 May 2017 | 10.00 am 11.30 am

The history of haute couture will be traced from its beginnings in the 19th century to its contemporary manifestation.  The construction of garments often engages interdisciplinary innovation along with often performative presentation. Currently at the forefront of design and experimentation, haute couture bridges an evocative intersection between past and future.  

PAOLA DI TROCCHIO is Curator, Fashion and Textiles at the NGV, Melbourne. She has curated  numerous exhibitions that have recently included 200 Years of Australian Fashion and Italian Jewels:  Bulgari Style.

JANE AUSTEN 200
It is the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen’s death on 18 July 1817 and to commemorate this significant event we begin a year-long programme of activities honoring the ongoing interpretation and influence of Jane Austen’s life and works.

“MY EMMA” with Lise Rodgers 
Thursday 27 April 2017 | 2.00 pm to 3.30 pm

… for my next, I have taken a heroine whom no one but myself will much like
Jane Austen, 1814

To commemorate the 200th anniversary of the publication of Emma in 1816, this new production reveals a more mature Jane, confident in her abilities as a novelist and for the first time taking an active role in managing her own affairs. 

Based on her letters of the period and of course the novel itself, here is the opportunity to celebrate the folk of Highbury and none more fascinating than Miss Emma Woodhouse herself. 

LISE RODGERS is an accomplished Melbourne actress whose career has spanned stage, screen and radio. An interest in the world and characters of Jane Austen is the inspiration behind her series of ‘Jane’ performances. 

image caption: Sir William Beechey RA (English, 1753-1839), Portrait of Marcia Fox, circa 1810, (Public Domain)

DRESS IN THE AGE OF JANE AUSTEN with Hilary Davidson
Wednesday 22 March 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am 

Jane Austen’s novels have become synonymous with early 19th century fashion, especially through filmed adaptations of her work. But what did people in this period really wear? How would Austen, her family and her characters have dressed as they moved through the countryside, villages and cities of late Georgian England? This lecture explores the world of Regency clothing to bring to life the fashionable world behind Austen’s immortal words.

HILARY DAVIDSON is a dress and textile historian & curator who was formerly curator of fashion and decorative art at the Museum of London. She has researched Austen-age fashion for a decade and is currently completing a major book on dress in the British Regency world for Yale (2018). Her most recent lecture at The Johnston Collection was DREAMS OF RED SHOES | Magic and Escape in 2016.

image caption: Cassandra Austen (English, 1773–1845), portrait of Jane Austen (1775-1817), circa 1804, watercolour on paper, private collection, (Creative Commons)

THE ADRIAN DICKENS SERIES

Adrian Dickens continues his series on famous jewellery and those who wore it.

ELIZABETH TAYLOR’S GREATEST LOVE AFFAIR – with jewels with Adrian Dickens 
Wednesday 19 April 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am 

Hollywood legend Elizabeth Taylor has long been associated with jewels – diamonds in particular, but the true extent of her staggering collection is not so well known. Said to be worth over $200 million at the star’s death, her collection has only gained in stature. Many pieces have become as legendary as the star who wore them, and the man who bought most of them – Richard Burton. Adrian Dickens has compiled a fascinating talk on the stories behind such jewels as the great Bulgari Sapphires, La Peregrina Pearl, the Mike Todd tiara, the Taj Mahal pendant and the unforgettable Taylor-Burton Diamond.

ADRIAN DICKENS trained in the United Kingdom for six years and has been a fixture on the Melbourne and Sydney fine jewellery scene for over 30 years. Dickens’ knowledge of historical and recent jewellery trends are insightful. He regularly gives talks and presentations nationally and internationally. He has managed some of Australia’s fine jewellery houses and now runs Circa AD Jewels. Dickens’ most recent lecture at the Collection was Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis | The Jewels of Camelot 

image caption: Elizabeth Taylor on the set of The V.I.P.s (film, 1963) © Photofest

WHY DO WE COLLECT? with Padraic Fisher
Tuesday 11 April 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am 

Come on a psycho-emotional romp through the compulsive pathology of ‘collector personality archetypes’ and the covetous urge to gather, assemble, accumulate and jealously protect. Through humour (and perhaps a touch of naivety), you will be taken on the ponderous journey from first teacup to all consuming obsession. Together we will explore questions such as: collector vs hoarder and ‘If an object falls into a collection, and no one ever sees it again, does it still make a sound? 

PADRAIC FISHER is Director, National Wool Museum in Geelong. A New York native, his background in arts, culture and heritage includes roles as producer, artist, curator, collector and educator. A decorative arts generalist his personal collection exceeds 2,000 objects of art and artefacts from the 11th century to the present. 

image caption: bowerbird (Open Content Image)

SHERLOCK HOLMES | A collection or an obsession? with John Byrne
Thursday 6 April 2017 | 12 noon to 1.30pm

What, if any, is the connection between Samuel Johnson & James Boswell and Sherlock Holmes & Dr Watson?

Both pairs of men are forever linked in our minds and appear alive to us through and by their friendship. But Johnson and Boswell were actual historical figures who lived in 18th century England whilst Holmes and Watson sprang, fully formed, from the fertile imagination of Arthur Conan Doyle a century later. Holmes & Watson are currently the subject of two high ranking television programmes whilst Johnson`s last appearance was as a figure of fun in an episode of "Blackadder". Why is this so and is it a just treatment of two towering figures of 18th century literature? Is Watson a "Boswell" to Holmes?

John Byrne is known to you as a collector of Johnson & Boswell but he is also an avid Sherlockian (as are many Johnsonians). He will tell you why this is so and will display treasures from his library to illustrate his lecture. Those attending are encouraged to wear "deer stalkers"!

JOHN BYRNE is a retired solicitor and founding member of the Johnson Society of Australia. He is currently a Governor of Dr Johnson's House, London, former President of The Johnson Society, Lichfield, England (2008-9), and former President of The Samuel Johnson Society of The West USA (2008-9). He has been a Johnson collector for over four decades and lectured widely in USA, UK and Australia. His most recent lecture at The Johnston Collection was DREAM LIBRARIES | My own & those I have visited.

Please note: this lecture runs from 12 noon to 1.30 pm

image: Illustration by Frederic Dorr Steele (American, 1873-1944), “Sherlock Holmes Act 4”, as published in William Hooker Gillette (American, 1853-1937), Sherlock Holmes - A Play, Doubleday, New York, 1935 edition

AT TABLE with Sophia Errey 
Tuesday 4 April 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am 

The "setting" of tables, those sites intimately associated with our daily nourishment and family and social lives has provided abundant opportunities for crafting objects in metal, ceramic, textiles and wood. We will explore a rich variety of these objects and their meanings within personal and cultural contexts.

SOPHIA ERREY is an artist, art educator and writer. She has lectured widely in the visual arts both historical and contemporary. She is particularly interested in objects, and the ways in which we craft and use them. Her most recent lecture at The Johnston Collection was CHINOISERIE | A Dream of Cathay.


image caption: Jean-Étienne Liotard (Swiss, 1702 - 1789), Still Life: Tea Set (circa 1781 – 1783), oil on canvas mounted on board | 378 x 516 mm, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles (Open Content Image)

BY POPULAR DEMAND | IN PRAISE OF LANCELOT ‘CAPABILITY’ BROWN

2016 marked the 300th anniversary of the birth of Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown who changed the face of 18th century England, designing country estates and mansions, moving hills and making serpentine lakes and flowing rivers, a magical world of green.

‘Capability’ Brown (1716 – 1783) is best remembered for landscape on an immense scale, constructing not only gardens and parkland, but planting woods and building farms linked by carriage drives, or `ridings’, many miles from the main house.

Although his work is continually reassessed, every landscape gardener and landscape architect since, both in Britain and around the world, has been influenced in one way or another by Brown.


image caption: after Nathaniel Dance, (later Sir Nathaniel Dance-Holland, Bt) (1735 – 1811), Lancelot (‘Capability’) Brown, (circa 1773), oil on canvas, 610 mm x 508 mm (oval), collection of the National Portrait Gallery, London, NPG 1490, purchased 1908

PAINSHILL PARK with Ian George 
Thursday 30 March 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am 

In the second lecture we look at the recently restored and reopened eighteenth century Surrey garden at Painshill designed by the Hon. Charles Hamilton between 1738 and 1773 which breathes much of the same unique British spirit. John Wilkes wrote to his daughter in 1772: "I … sauntered through the elysium of Mr Hamilton's gardens till eight in the evening, like the first solitary man through Paradise." 

DR IAN GEORGE AO has been an art critic and historian since the 1960's. His postgraduate work was in aesthetics. Since then he has served on the Visual Arts Committee of the Festival of Perth, as a Trustee of the Queensland Art Gallery and Vice-President of the Queensland Festival, had two terms on the Community Arts Board of the Australia Council and is a regular lecturer at the National Gallery of Australia, the Art Gallery of SA and the National Gallery of Victoria. 

image caption: A peaceful view across the water of Painshill's ruined abbey, courtesy of Fred Holmes, Painshill

BLENHEIM & PETWORTH with Ian George 
Thursday 23 March 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am 

We celebrated the 300th anniversary of the birth of ‘Capability’ Brown in 2016. Brown was the key genius behind the development of the English landscape garden style which swept over Europe and the USA and continues to dominate a great deal of Western garden design today. It brought the "sublime and the beautiful" from painting into the landscape in a revolutionary way. He was involved in no less than 140 different British gardens.

In our first lecture we look at Brown's life and art, and especially the great gardens of Blenheim and Petworth, perhaps his greatest achievements.

DR IAN GEORGE AO has been an art critic and historian since the 1960's. His postgraduate work was in aesthetics. Since then he has served on the Visual Arts Committee of the Festival of Perth, as a Trustee of the Queensland Art Gallery and Vice-President of the Queensland Festival, had two terms on the Community Arts Board of the Australia Council and is a regular lecturer at the National Gallery of Australia, the Art Gallery of SA and the National Gallery of Victoria. 

image caption: Pieter Tillemans (1684-1734), A panoramic view of Petworth House and Park, turn of the 17th / 18th century, oil on canvas, 663 x 1731 mm, Public Domain

NATURE AS MODEL: The Italian Renaissance Garden with Luke Morgan 
Tuesday 28 March 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am 

This lecture will survey Italian garden design of the 15th and 16th centuries. Most villa gardens of the 15th century, even those of the Medici family in Tuscany, were essentially orti (orchards). Their main function was productive rather the provision of pleasure. The lecture will propose that what we are accustomed to think of as the Italian Renaissance garden does not genuinely emerge until the 16th century when three key concepts begin to inform its layout: first, the demonstrable application of a design process; second, a new humanist understanding of the garden as a 'third nature' (terza natura); and, third, the development of the idea of villeggiatura (the withdrawal to the country).

LUKE MORGAN is Associate Professor of Art History & Theory at Monash University. His books include The Monster in the Garden: The Grotesque the Gigantic in Renaissance Landscape Design (2015) and Nature as Model: Salomon de Caus and Early Seventeenth-Century Landscape Design (2007), both published by the University of Pennsylvania Press. His current research, which focuses on the theme of enchantment in early modern landscape experience, is funded by the Australian Research Council.

image caption: Giusto Utens (Justus Utens) (Flemish, died 1609), Lunette of Villa di Castello (as it appeared in 1599), (Creative Commons)

WILLIAM MORRIS and the interiors of Adelaide’s most fashionable houses 1880-1929 with Rebecca Evans 
Tuesday 21 March 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am 

The Art Gallery of South Australia holds the most comprehensive collection of Morris & Co. furnishing outside of the United Kingdom. This collection is due to Adelaide’s wealthy Barr Smith family, who furnished their large houses with Morris designs. This lecture will examine the interiors of these houses and how they signified the taste, status and identity of the Barr Smith family and by extension proclaimed Adelaide as cosmopolitan in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. 

REBECCA EVANS is the Curator of Decorative Arts, Art Gallery of South Australia. In 2016 she curated an exhibition on South Australian artist Catherine Truman and a display celebrating 50 years of the Guildhouse organisation. She is currently preparing for an exhibition featuring Linda Jackson’s creative collaborations with Utopia and Santa Teresa. 
Her previous lecture at the Collection was Scottish Migration and the Wool Industry in Colonial Australia (2016).

This lecture is generously supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection.

image caption:  designed by William Morris (English, 1834-1896) for MORRIS & COMPANY, London, specimen of Wreath wallpaper, wood-block print on paper, collection of the Art Gallery of South Australia, 20032D1, (used with permission)

EXCLUSIVE MASTERCLASS

UNLOCKING INTERNATIONAL TREASURES | Furniture in the National Trust of England Houses with Wolf Burchard
Tuesday 21 March 2017 | 6.30 for 7.00 pm until 8.00 pm

The lecture is kindly presented in conjunction with The Furniture History Society (Victoria).

Taken as a whole, The National Trust of England, Wales and Northern Ireland is looking after one of the largest furniture collections in the World. This lecture will give an overview of the highlights in that collection – such as the royal chairs at Knole, the Congress of Vienna desk at Mount Stewart and the Italian suite at Attingham Park – and discuss the numerous new discoveries we are making with our research.

WOLF BURCHARD is the Furniture Research Curator at the National Trust of England, Wales and Northern Ireland overseeing the research and cataloguing of the Trust’s vast furniture collection. He was Curatorial Assistant at the Royal Collection Trust from 2009 to 2014 where he co-curated The First Georgians: Art & Monarchy, 1714-1760 at The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace. In 2016 he published The Sovereign Artist on the artistic relationship between Louis XIV and his principal painter Charles Le Brun. Dr Burchard publishes and regularly lectures on the art and architectural patronage at the British, French and German courts.

PLEASE NOTE: The lecture will be held in the upstairs Meeting Room at the East Melbourne Library, 122 George St, East Melbourne. Attendees are able to go directly to this venue.

image caption:A Louis XIV ebony, marble and marquetry cabinet-on-stand, circa 1670, Nostell Priory, West Yorkshire (Creative Commons)

VIRGIN AUSTRALIA MELBOURNE FASHION FESTIVAL 2017 ARTS PROGRAM

The Johnston Collection is delighted to be a participant in the VAMFF 2017 ARTS PROGRAM with three special lectures in March.

HOW DOES A CHARACTER IN FICTION, BECOME A FASHION ICON? Fashion in Literature - Out Loud with Lise Rodgers is on Thursday 2 March 2017, HAUTE COUTURE HOUSES with Paola Di Trocchio is on Tuesday 7 March 2017 and REPRO RETRO | Channelling 40s, 50s and 60s styles with Lesley Sharon Rosenthal is on Thursday 9 March 2017.

The Virgin Australia Melbourne Fashion Festival is an annual celebration of fashion, beauty, business and creative endeavour for everyone to enjoy.

REPRO RETRO | Channelling 40s, 50s and 60s styles with Lesley Sharon Rosenthal
Thursday 9th March 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am
A curious phenomenon of 21st Century fashion is Repro Retro. Often worn by eccentric fashion subcultures, the clothing has evolved over generations to mimic aspects of times gone by. Throughout Australia and the world, in workshops, private sewing rooms, and sold online, stunning styles are being rebirthed as reproduction retro. With accents and fabric prints stolen from history, garments are reinterpreted for people nostalgic for a lost world of glamour and dramatic effect who wish to channel colour, character and charisma. Can repro retro clothing even top vintage originals? Is repro retro a backlash to today’s functional utilitarian sportswear looks? Lesley Sharon Rosenthal’s lecture will make you burn your puffer jacket!

LESLEY SHARON ROSENTHAL is a writer and filmmaker with a love of history. Her films Boutique Magnifique, and Chapel of Chic documented the history of Collins Street's fashion through its high-end boutiques and Chapel Street’s history of fashion over a 100 years

HOW DOES A CHARACTER IN FICTION, BECOME A FASHION ICON?
Fashion in Literature - Out Loud with Lise Rodgers
Thursday 2 March 2017 | 2.00 pm to 3.30 pm

How does a character in fiction, become a fashion icon?
Why do we describe certain styles as being very Breakfast at Tiffany’s, very Gone with the Wind, or even, very Jane Austen, very Nancy Mitford.
How does a character’s clothing in a novel, become such an identifiable look in our minds that it takes on a life of its own. Going back to the source – the stories themselves – let’s meet some of these icons as they first appeared on the page.

LISE RODGERS is an accomplished Melbourne actress whose career has spanned stage, screen and radio. Widely known for her ongoing Jane Austen series of performances, it is her passion for the Spoken Word that inspires her series of performed readings – Literature Out Loud.

EMPEROR NERO AND THE OTHER FIRE | Five glass collectors and collections of renown with Geoffrey Edwards 
Tuesday 28 February 2017 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am 

This discussion of famous collectors of ancient, antique and modern glass includes commentary on public institutions that became, in time, the ultimate and fortunate repositories of the respective collections. Subjects range from 19th century collector, philanthropist and lawyer, Felix Slade, whose fabulous bequests enriched the British Museum, British Library and Oxford University; to the Ware Collection of ‘Glass Flowers’ at Harvard University’s Museum of Natural History. A famous Melbourne collection also features in the narrative.

GEOFFREY EDWARDS was Director of the Geelong Gallery for fifteen years. In mid-2016, he retired to pursue freelance lecturing, writing and advisory work. Prior to his Geelong Gallery position, Geoffrey held senior curatorial positions at the NGV. His most recent lecture at The Johnston Collection was Giant, Ancient & Historic Trees.


image caption: Abraham Janssens van Nuyssen (Flemish, 1575-1632) Nero (1620)image by Ralf Roletschek, Public Domain

NEW | MELBOURNE STORIES

CHAPEL STREET’S RISE AND FALL AS HIGH FASHION STREET OF DREAMS with Lesley Sharon Rosenthal
Thursday 28 July 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

Chapel Street was a fashion street of dreams showcasing Australia’s funkiest boutiques selling the creations of our trendiest designers. A fashion community of hip retailers mentored ‘new talent’. It was buzzing and happening. But in the early 2000s, it suffered a downfall. How did Chapel Street rise from ordinary suburban shopping strip to national high fashion hotspot frequented by Australian and world famous celebrities? LESLEY SHARON ROSENTHAL will present the unique history of Chapel Street’s fashion and clothing history.

LESLEY SHARON ROSENTHAL is a writer and filmmaker who has a love of history. Her films Boutique Magnifique, and Chapel of Chic documenting the history of Collins Street's fashion through its high-end boutiques and Chapel Street’s history of fashion over a hundred years, drew large audiences to ACMI and the Astor Theatre. 

She has also written the book SCHMATTES: Stories of Fabulous Frocks, Funky Fashion and Flinders Lane (2005) documenting Flinders Lane’s colourful history of the rag trade. Lesley’s most recent talk at The Johnston Collection was PRAHRAN MARKET | A Journey From Temporary Outdoor Market To Chefs’ Gourmet Paradise.

early 20th Century Chapel Street, photograph courtesy of Stonnington History Centre

STORIES BEHIND MELBOURNE’S GHOSTSIGNS with Nick Gadd
Tuesday 20 September 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

Nick Gadd has spent two years walking around Melbourne in a big circle, photographing and writing about ghostsigns (old faded signage) and other traces of the past. He will show photographs of his discoveries and tell some of the stories he has uncovered, which point to intriguing aspects of Melbourne’s history. 

NICK GADD is a Melbourne novelist, essayist and blogger.  His writings about Melbourne, history, literature, music and suburban life have appeared in The Guardian, Griffith Review, Eureka Street, and many others. He currently writes the blog Melbourne Circle about a long walk around the Melbourne suburbs. 

In 2015 Nick was the winner of the Nature Conservancy Prize for Nature Writing for the essay ‘A Landscape of Stories’, and was shortlisted in the essay category of the Melbourne Prize for Literature. He was recently awarded a month-long residency by the Mildura Writers Festival.

melbournecircle.net
griffithreview.com/articles/a-landscape-of-stories

SYLVIA SAGONA SERIES

ORIENTALISM | Fantasies of conquest and sensuality in 19th century French art with Sylvia Sagona
Tuesday 13 September 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

Orientalism as an art movement, developed during the French colonial expansion into North Africa in the mid 19th century at a time of change in social and medical perceptions of women. Orientalist art, depicting exotic, sensual and barbaric customs with almost photographic precision could be seen as an effort to not only justify colonialism but also to pander to nostalgic fantasies of the harem and the eternal feminine.

SYLVIA SAGONA is an internationally recognised specialist on 19th century French society. She retired from the French Department at The University of Melbourne to work on historical documentaries for French and Australian television and is currently researching a book on the invention of the restaurant in Paris in the 18th century.

Jean ¬Léon Gérôme (French, 1824 - ¬1904), After the bath, circa 1880, oil on canvas | 826 x 667 mm, private collection

NEW | IN PRAISE OF LANCELOT ‘CAPABILITY’ BROWN
2016 marks the 300th anniversary of the birth of Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown who changed the face of 18th century England, designing country estates and mansions, moving hills and making serpentine lakes and flowing rivers, a magical world of green.

‘Capability’ Brown (1716 – 1783) is best remembered for landscape on an immense scale, constructing not only gardens and parkland, but planting woods and building farms linked by carriage drives, or `ridings', many miles from the main house. Although his work is continually reassessed, every landscape gardener and landscape architect since, both in Britain and around the world, has been influenced in one way or another by Brown.

‘NOBLE PROSPECTS IN THE NORTH’ with Richard Heathcote
Wednesday 7 September 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am SOLD OUT

Capability Brown designed over 20 landscapes in Yorkshire alone and in Derbyshire created for the Duke of Devonshire the definitive Arcadian landscape at Chatsworth his estate in The Peak District.  This year Richard Heathcote visited some of these cultural landscapes in the north of England and his talk will present his view on the shift in taste that Brown brought to the English country house with the style the French called 'Le Jardin Anglais'.

RICHARD HEATHCOTE is the Director of Carrick Hill historic house and garden in Adelaide and the National Chairman of the Australian Garden History Society.  His main interests as a garden historian and art curator concern the social use of gardens and how art informs our understanding and inspires our imaginations.

GIANT, ANCIENT & HISTORIC TREES with Geoffrey Edwards
Tuesday 30 August 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

This lecture tells the story of famous trees as documented in historical and modern paintings, prints, photographs and antiquarian books. Opening with 'great trees of the world' Geoffrey will focus on famous trees in Australia such as the legendary 'Dig Tree' and other symbols of personal, social and political aspiration.

GEOFFREY EDWARDS was Director of the Geelong Gallery for fifteen years. At the end of April 2016 Edwards retired to pursue lecturing, writing and advisory work. Prior to his Geelong Gallery position, Geoffrey held senior curatorial positions at the NGV.

BLENHEIM & PETWORTH with Ian George
Thursday 18 August 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am SOLD OUT

This year is the 300th anniversary of the birth of ‘Capability’ Brown, the key genius behind the development of the English landscape garden style which swept over Europe and the USA and continues to dominate a great deal of Western garden design today. It brought the "sublime and the beautiful" from painting into the landscape in a revolutionary way. He was involved in no less than 140 different British gardens.

In our first lecture we look at Brown's life and art, and especially the great gardens of Blenheim and Petworth, perhaps his greatest achievements. 

PAINSHILL PARK with Ian George
Thursday 25 August 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am SOLD OUT

In the second lecture we look at the recently restored and reopened eighteenth century Surrey garden at Painshill designed by the Hon. Charles Hamilton between 1738 and 1773 which breathes much of the same unique British spirit. John Wilkes wrote to his daughter in 1772: "I … sauntered through the elysium of Mr Hamilton's gardens till eight in the evening, like the first solitary man through Paradise."


DR IAN GEORGE AO has been an art critic and historian since the 1960's.  His postgraduate work was in aesthetics. Since then he has served on the Visual Arts Committee of the Festival of Perth, as a Trustee of the Queensland Art Gallery and Vice-President of the Queensland Festival, had two terms on the Community Arts Board of the Australia Council and is a regular lecturer at the National Gallery of Australia, the Art Gallery of SA and the National Gallery of Victoria.

LEARN | STUDY SERIES | DREAM PLACES

Presented by well-known art, social and cultural historians, the DREAM HOUSE Study Series will explore the artistic social and cultural worlds where objects, interiors and design meet. The lectures and events will consider how historical contemporary ideas connect and convey meanings that celebrate culture in the making.

DREAMS OF DESTINY: The Progeny of Bess of Hardwick with Dorothy Morgan
Wednesday 14 September 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

We all know Queen Victoria spread her children throughout the thrones of Europe, creating ties of kinship and obligation.  But did you know that three hundred years earlier Elizabeth, Countess of Shrewsbury, better known today as Bess of Hardwick, was doing exactly the same thing in the English aristocracy.  So successful was she that it has been suggested there is probably no present English aristocratic family, including the Royals, which does not contain her DNA.  How did she do it?

DOROTHY MORGAN, an honours history graduate of The University of Melbourne, was Guest Curator of both the exhibition FLOWERING NEEDLES: embroidery from Elizabeth to Victoria, (2010) and the house tour FAIR HALL TO GLAD PARLOUR: The Flower, Its Beauty & Meaning in Art & Ornament (2011).  With a particular interest in embroidery and textiles she has presented several lectures on related topics at both The Johnston Collection and other venues. Her most recent talk at The Johnston Collection was SAVAGE NATIONALISM: Tartan from William Wallace to Alexander McQueen.

DREAM LIBRARIES | My own & those I have visited with John Byrne
Thursday 1 September 2016 | 12.00 pm to 1.30 pm [Please note this lecture starts at midday]

"All my life I have gathered books into my possession. Over the years the number grew. First, a mantlepiece for the books of a child, then pine boards and bricks to hold a university student`s texts and Penguin Classics, finally an adult`s bookcases filled to overflowing and the realization that I was becoming ""a book collector"". I began to dream of a ""proper"" library and 20 years later I built it in central Victoria.

 I love to sit in it`s quiet space,  gaze at the books and inhale the aroma of leather and old paper all the while recalling the joy and adventures that I had putting my collection together. I will tell you of the libraries, both private and public, which I have visited all over the world, the dreams (and nightmares)of those who built them and the influence these visits had on me."

JOHN BYRNE is a retired solicitor and founding member of the Johnson Society of Australia. He is currently a Governor of Dr Johnson's House, London, former President of The Johnson Society, Lichfield, England (2008-9), and former President of The Samuel Johnson Society of The West USA (2008-9). He has been a Johnson collector for over four decades and lectured widely in USA, UK and Australia.

 

DREAMS OF RED SHOES I Magic and Escape with Hilary Davidson
Wednesday 31 August 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am 

Red shoes are the shoes of dreams. Full of magic and glamour, they have cast a spell over people for hundreds of years. This talk explores red shoes as vehicles for dreaming, and how they enchant, bewitch and entrap the cultural imagination from Hans Christian Andersen to The Wizard of Oz, suggesting what we might be or aspire to in escaping everyday life.

HILARY DAVIDSON is a dress and textile historian & curator who was formerly curator of fashion and decorative art at the Museum of London. She trained as a shoemaker, has researched extensively on red shoes and is currently completing a book on Regency fashion for Yale.

CHINOISERIE | A Dream of Cathay with Sophie Errey
Wednesday 24 August 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

The exotic remote East figured for hundreds of years in the Western imagination as a source of fascinating but chaotic and semi-mythical images and stories, a dream world of seduction and longing. While the objects of desire changed, the lure of the realm called Cathay by Marco Polo remained. Beautiful, bizarre and astonishingly hybrid objects which reflect this dream form an important strand in The Johnston Collection.

SOPHIA ERREY is an artist, art educator and writer. She has lectured widely in the visual arts both historical and contemporary. She has previously developed a course on “Oriental Art and the West” for art students in both Melbourne and Hong Kong.

 

THE HOUSE MUSEUM: Where House & Art Museum Converge with Georgina Walker
Wednesday 17 August 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

Art historian Anne Higonnet refers to privately founded historic house-museums as ‘personal art collection museums’ because they were always intended to be publicly accessible, hence they are no longer entirely private, even though loosely speaking some were private houses. 

House-museums in her opinion are either houses that have been preserved for their historic or architectural importance, or simply because they belonged to a famous person. The waters start to muddy a little when a notable art collection is involved within the house, in which case, the question arises whether the art becomes the distinguishing feature, and not the house itself.

GEORGINA WALKER teaches into the Master of Art Curatorship program at The University of Melbourne. Her PhD thesis, The Private Museum: Contemporary Art Collecting and Philanthropy, investigated the recent growth in international private museums. She is one of a few international scholars who has conducted targeted research into this emerging and growing field.

DREAMING OF THE DEPARTED: Australian mourning portraits with Margot Riley
Tuesday 16 August 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

Grieving protocols intensified throughout the second half of the 19th century, following the model set by Queen Victoria after the death of Prince Albert in 1861. Memorial portraiture – the practice of recording a person’s likeness soon after death – was already established in European art but gained greater currency as photography enabled the mechanisation of portrait-making. 

MARGOT RILEY is a cultural historian with special interest in textiles and dress. From 1992-1994, she completed the Masters in Museum Studies Program at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York and, since her return to Australia, has been working as a Curator with the collections of the State Library of New South Wales in Sydney. Her previous talk at the Collection was SCOTTY IN GUMNUT LAND | Australian Expressions of Scots Identity (2016).

This lecture is generously supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection.

Maurice Felton (1803-1842), Sophia Statham O'Brien (1820-1841), oil on canvas, collection of the State Library of New South Wales, Sydney, DG 427: c074310001

DREAMING OF THE BELOVED: Heloise in literature from the 18th century to the present with Constant J. Mews and readings by Maryna Mews
Wednesday 3 August 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

This presentation explores the range of ways Heloise has been imagined in English literature, beginning with an enormously popular translation by John Hughes in 1713, and then Alexander Pope’s Eloisa to Abelard, a poem widely imitated in the eighteenth century. Why did the story of Abelard and Heloise create such interest in the 18th century. It looks at fascination in the 18th and early 19th century in the figure of Heloise, as one who dreams about her beloved within the constraints of religious life. The talk concludes by looking at various 20th-century presentations of Heloise in literature, notably by Helen Waddell as well as some more recent efforts. It argues that Heloise has always been perceived as a modern figure, in every generation.

CONSTANT J. MEWS, Director of the Centre for Studies in Religion and Theology at Monash University since 1991, is specialist in medieval intellectual and religious history, with a particular interest in the twelfth century. He is a major authority on the writings and intellectual milieu of Peter Abelard and Heloise, having edited Abelard's Theologia for the series Corpus Christianorum, and having published a number of books on this topic, including The Lost Love Letters of Heloise and Abelard: Perceptions of Dialogue in Twelfth-Century France (Palgrave, 1999) and Abelard and Heloise (Oxford University Press, 2005). He has also published extensively on Hildegard of Bingen and religious women in medieval culture.

Angelica Kauffmann (Austrian, 1741 – 1807), The Farewell of Abelard and Héloïse, circa 1787, oil on canvas, 656 x 655 nm, collection of Hermitage, St. Petersburg, Russia

 

DECODING THE 'CONUNDRUM CASTLE': A Twenty-First Century Reading of Walter Scott's house at Abbotsford with Suzanne Fraser
Wednesday 27 July 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

This lecture will examine the historic eccentricities and whimsicalities that comprise the site – both the exterior and interior – of the poet and novelist Sir Walter Scott’s fantastical castle, Abbotsford, in the Borders of Scotland (built between 1816 and 1824). The complexities of Scott’s house, which the author named his ‘conundrum castle’, will be reappraised in light of new research concerning national identity, Scottishness and romantic narratives.

SUZANNE FRASER is a recent PhD graduate and tutor/guest lecturer at the University of Melbourne. Her research encompasses 18th to 20th century British art, art of empires, and national identity. She recently contributed to the catalogue, FOR AULD LANG SYNE: images of Scottish Australia from First Fleet to Federation (Inglis and Macdonald, 2014). Her most recent lecture at The Johnston Collection was REVISITING THE ADAM STYLE: Design, Enlightenment, and 18th century Scotland.

 

DREAM ON: Jung & Freud with Sophie Errey
Wednesday 13 July 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am

Freud’s The Interpretation of Dreams (1899) and Jung’s development of ideas of the collective unconscious and archetypal symbols have profoundly affected contemporary culture at all levels, from the most popular to the most intellectually sophisticated. We will explore their related but different thinking, and how it has changed ideas about what role dreams play in our inner and outer landscape.    

SOPHIA ERREY is an artist, art educator and writer. She has lectured widely in the visual arts both historical and contemporary including developing and teaching a course on Art and Psychoanalysis. Her last lecture at The Johnston Collection was IDENTITY & ROMANCE: The Celtic Revival in Jewellery and Objects 

Group photo 1909 in front of Clark University. Front row, Sigmund Freud, G. Stanley Hall, Carl Jung. Back row, Abraham Brill, Ernest Jones, Sándor Ferenczi. Public Domain

 

THE ADRIAN DICKENS SERIES

BY POPULAR DEMAND | THE POSSESSIONS OF THE DUKE AND DUCHESS OF WINDSOR | ART OR OBSESSION? with Adrian Dickens
Thursday 14 July 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am 

In September 2013 Adrian Dickens went to Paris in search of greater insight into the story of the abdication of England’s King Edward VIII - over 70 years has passed the greatest crisis in the modern history of the British monarchy in 1936. The mystery of, and the effects of the abdication are still being felt today. 

Dickens tried to discover more by visiting the Paris home of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor. The result offers a different perspective on the British monarchy. In this lecture Dickens unlocks the history of this relationship and the fraught, often poisonous, relations with the Duke’s family. He re-examines the purpose of their cluttered, rambling possessions - and breathtaking jewels - and the role they play in understanding the impact of Mrs Simpson on the Monarchy that is unique in its political and historical significance. 

Learn how – and why – a man who didn’t want the throne of England spent the rest of his life trying to replicate it. Hear the stories behind the Duchess’ obsession with fashion and displays of jewels. Discover who ‘Cookie’ and ‘Shirley Temple’ are … and why the Windsor’s loathed them. Understand how the Windsor’s used their collections and possessions to undermine the occupants of Buckingham Palace.

ADRIAN DICKENS trained in the United Kingdom for six years and has been a fixture on the Melbourne and Sydney fine jewellery scene for over 30 years. Adrian’s knowledge of historical and recent jewellery trends are insightful. He regularly gives talks and presentations nationally and internationally. He has managed some of Australia’s fine jewellery houses and now runs Circa AD Jewels.

JACQUELINE BOUVIER KENNEDY ONASSIS ... the jewels of Camelot with Adrian Dickens
Tuesday 23 August 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am SOLD OUT

Explore how the jewels of the Camelot White House are such a poignant reminder of a tragically short, remarkable – and still yearned-for-era.

Of all the famous women of the 20th century Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis is the most mysterious and compelling. Renowned for her role in the memorable White House of John F. Kennedy, Jackie was regarded as one of the most formidable style icons of her time. 

This talk explores her treasure trove as well as her renowned interest in French, American and Greek culture. Her jewels tell a story of rare personal, historical and political significance. They also uncover a tantalising, unpredictable and elusive woman who led an extraordinary life, filled with triumph and tragedy in equal measure.

Adrian Dickens will introduce her background and see how she created the ‘untouchable’ woman she became. You will discover the reality of being the political wife of a Kennedy and understand how the assassination of President Kennedy tested Jacqueline’s sanity. 
The talk will also take into account the story behind the dazzling jewels Aristotle Onassis used to woo the most famous widow in the world.


ADRIAN DICKENS trained in the United Kingdom for six years and has been a fixture on the Melbourne and Sydney fine jewellery scene for over 30 years. Adrian’s knowledge of historical and recent jewellery trends are insightful. He regularly gives talks and presentations nationally and internationally. He has managed some of Australia’s fine jewellery houses and now runs Circa AD Jewels. His most recent lecture at The Johnston Collection was THE POSSESSIONS OF THE DUKE AND DUCHESS OF WINDSOR | Art or Obsession?

 

LEARN | SCOTTISH STUDY SERIES | BY YON BONNIE BRAE

Presented by well-known art, social and cultural historians, the Scottish Study Series By Yon Bonnie Brae will explore the artistic social and cultural worlds where art, fashion, interiors and design meet. The lectures and events will consider how historical and contemporary international and local artists connect with their contemporaries and convey meanings that celebrate culture in the making.

The Johnston Collection would like to acknowledge the encouragement and support of Dr Alison Inglis, Associate Professor, Art History Program, University of Melbourne with the development of the Scottish Study Series.

SCOTTISH MIGRATION AND THE WOOL INDUSTRY IN COLONIAL AUSTRALIA with Rebecca Evans
Thursday 23 June 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18 

From the 1840s until the 1950s the Australian economy ‘rode on the sheep’s back’. John Macarthur was a key player in the establishment of this industry in Australia. In 1789 he immigrated to the colony of New South Wales and in 1794 commenced experiments in wool growth by cross breeding sheep. This lecture will look at the role Macarthur played in the establishment of the early Australian wool industry.

REBECCA EVANS is an Assistant Curator at the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences (MAAS), Sydney. She is founding member of the Australian Dress Register. Rebecca has worked on projects including LOVE LACE: Powerhouse Museum's International Lace Award (2011), A FINE POSSESSION: Jewellery and Identity (2014), and is currently curating an exhibition of Australian colonial dress, opening mid-2016. Her previously lecture at The Johnston Collection was COLONIAL FASHION | Wearing identity (2015).

This lecture is generously supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection.

THE SYLVIA SAGONA STUDY SERIES | BONNIE SCOTLAND AND LA BELLE FRANCE

Over the centuries France and Scotland have often been allies against their common enemy; the English. Indeed, during the 100 years War, Joan of Arc was supported by Scottish guards in her victory over the English at Orleans. It would be Scottish spies employed as mapmakers for Henry VIII who would supply the French with vital intelligence for a thwarted invasion. When Mary Queen of Scots, who had been brought up at the French court, married the Dauphin of France, there were hopes that the two countries would be finally united. She brought the French language and customs to the Scottish court.

This series of lectures will examine the close relationship between these two countries based on mutual respect and cultural similarities

SYLVIA SAGONA is an internationally recognised specialist on 19th century French society. She retired from the French Department at The University of Melbourne to work on historical documentaries for French and Australian television and is currently researching a book on the invention of the restaurant in Paris in the 18th century.

THOMAS BLAIKIE: The Scottish landscape gardener of Malmaison, Parc Monceau and the Bagatelle with Sylvia Sagona
Thursday 28 April 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18 SOLD OUT

French gardeners such as Lenôtre were famed for their imposing geometric style showcased at Versailles. So when something unusual and whimsical was called for the French Royal court turned to a Scottish gardener, Blaikie. 

When the Comte D’ Artois, brother of Louis VI, made a bet with Marie Antoinette about creating the Bagatelle gardens, he called in Blaikie to pull it off. The extraordinary Parc Monceau complete with grottos and ruins, was also designed by Blaikie for the Duc d’Orleans. 

Josephine who considered herself a trendsetter commissioned Blaikie to design the gardens of Malmaison in the fashionable English style at a time when her husband Napoleon was at war with the British. 

THE LEGEND OF FINGAL: The great 18th century Gaelic literary hoax which fooled Goethe, Napoleon, Schubert and Voltaire with Sylvia Sagona
Thursday 21 April 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18 SOLD OUT

James McPherson rose to celebrity as the “translator” of long lost Gaelic manuscripts which he had “discovered” in the Scottish highlands. The Works of Ossian, son of Fingal were hailed throughout Europe as the Gaelic equivalent of Homer and the stories of Walhalla. 

Napoleon always carried a copy to the battlefield and commissioned French artists to use the legend for his own propaganda. Despite being denounced as a fake by Samuel Johnson, the Ossian saga inspired the first works of the Romantic movement and McPherson, the great con man, bought the right to be interred in Poets’ Corner in Westminster Abbey.

THE EMPRESS EUGÉNIE: A Kirkpatrick on the throne of France with Sylvia Sagona 
Thursday 14 April 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18 SOLD OUT

The last Empress of the French was a Spanish beauty, Eugénie de Montijo, who owed her auburn hair and fiery temperament to her Scottish grandparents. When she became the wife of Napoleon 111 in 1853 she was called upon to play her role in recreating Paris as the capital of culture, elegance and cutting edged glamour. Her devout Catholicism would influence her husband’s foreign policy and ultimately lead to the fall of the Second Empire.

LEARN | EXCLUSIVE MASTERCLASS

FROM OLD TO NEW LUXURY | From Hollywood stars to the late Queen Mother and everything in between with Peter McNeil and Giorgio Riello 

Tuesday 3 May 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18 SOLD OUT  

 
Modernist ideas minted in the first part of the twentieth century argued for a notion of luxury that transcended intrinsic value: luxuries that were simply not available for all to see, as had happened in the nineteenth century. In the inter-war years a new generation of designers, from Coco Chanel for fashion to Jean-Michel Frank for furnishing, turned their back on the ostentatious exoticism and orientialism of fin-de-siècle taste and reinvented the notion of luxury. The disciplined and severely elegant design of interiors and furniture for trans-Atlantic elites of the 1930s navigated between the poles of post-Bauhaus austerity and neo-Baroque opulence. Frank and Chanel exemplify the period’s ‘chic of poverty’, an expression minted by Cecil Beaton. One might say that the creation of luxury that does not look like such is the very pinnacle of luxury itself: a form of distinction that only those in the know can discern. The idea of purity (of forms but also of moral conduct) might seems at odd with the notion of excess that had characterised luxury over its long history. Yet, in an age in which decoration has become cheap and at the reach of the majority, luxury adopted its diametrical opposite to retain its exclusivity. Taste became a rare commodity that could be bought. The twentieth century therefore shows a distancing from the mere accumulation to a more aestheticised vision of what luxury means and the role that it has in people’s lives.
 
PETER McNEIL is Professor of Design History at the University of Technology Sydney and Distinguished Professor, Aalto University, Finland. He is the author of numerous publications including ten works on fashion, including the best-selling Shoes, also translated into Italian (with Giorgio Riello 2006; 2011). His new book entitled 'Pretty Gentlemen': Macaroni Men and the Eighteenth Century Fashion World is forthcoming with Yale University Press.
 
GIORGIO RIELLO is Professor of Global History and Culture and Director of the Institute of Advanced Study at the University of Warwick. He has published extensively on the history of fashion, design and consumption in early modern Europe and Asia and is the coordinator of the Leverhulme-funded ‘The Luxury Network’ , a collaboration between Warwick, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Museum of Art and Design in New York, and the universities of Bologna, Stockholm and Melbourne. Together with Peter McNeil he recently published a book entitled Luxury: A Rich History (Oxford University Press 2016).

TANGIBLE MEMORIES with Patricia Tryon Macdonald
Wednesday 25 May 2016, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20/$18

Patricia Tryon Macdonald has been a migrant three times in her life, so feels great empathy for our early settlers.

In the 19th century migrants to Australia faced a long, potentially dangerous, voyage in cramped conditions and limited baggage, so what did they take to remind them of the home and country they would probably never see again? 

Perhaps the most poignant objects are those recovered from shipwrecks such as The Dunbar, which sank at Sydney Heads in 1857 on its second return voyage to the colony. A cache of items belonging to early Melbourne settlers unearthed at the ‘Little Lon’ site, when a building site was excavated by archaeologists in 1987-88, also provide fascinating insights into Melbourne 140 years ago, in what was once a notorious red light district.

These, and other precious things passed down the generations shed light on the precarious and challenging world of our early settlers.

PATRICIA TRYON MACDONALD is an independent curator. Her recent exhibitions include Exiles and Emigrants: Epic Journeys to Australia in the Victorian Era, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2005-2006) and For Auld Lang Syne: Images of Scottish Australia from First Fleet to Federation, Art Gallery of Ballarat (2014).

ALLAN RAMSAY AND THE NATURAL PORTRAIT with Georgina Cole
Wednesday 11 May 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18

In the 1750s, Scottish artist Allan Ramsay developed a new mode of intimate, informal and intellectual picture called the ‘natural portrait’. This lecture considers the relationship of Ramsay’s portraiture to the Enlightenment exchange of ideas through polite conversation, focusing on his portraits of Margaret Lindsay of Evelick and philosophers David Hume and Jean-Jacques Rousseau.

GEORGINA COLE’s interests include 18th century painting, architecture and art theory. In 2010, she received her doctorate from the University of Sydney with a thesis on doors and threshold spaces in 18th century genre painting. She is currently working on representations of blindness in 18th century art. Cole teaches the history of art at the National Art School and is a regular presenter at the Art Gallery of New South Wales.
Her most recent lecture at The Johnston Collection was REVEALING AND CONCEALING in the Rococo interior (2015).

This lecture is generously supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection

SCOTTY IN GUMNUT LAND | AUSTRALIAN EXPRESSIONS OF SCOTS with Margot Riley 
Wednesday 4 May 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18

Scottish settlers arrived in Australia with the First Fleet in 1788 and currently represent 8.3% of the population with Scots ancestry the fourth most commonly nominated by Australian residents. International Tartan Day is celebrated annually on 1 July and a strong Scottish cultural presence continues to be found throughout our history and within our public collections. 

This talk will highlight Australian expressions of Scots nationalism as represented though depictions of motifs such as tartan, heather and the thistle in the State Library of NSW, and including the story of the 1988 Bicentenary design competition for Australia’s National Tartan.

MARGOT RILEY is a cultural historian with special interest in textiles and dress. From 1992-1994, she completed the Masters in Museum Studies Program at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York and, since her return to Australia, has been working as a Curator with the collections of the State Library of New South Wales in Sydney. Her previous talk at the Collection was FINE FEATHERS MAY MAKE FINE BIRDS, but do they make fine ladies? (2015).

This lecture is generously supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection.

A NEW DRESS FOR EMMA with Lise Rodgers 
Thursday 18 February 2016 | 2.00 pm to 3.30 pm | $20 / $18

See VIRGIN AUSTRALIA MELBOURNE FASHION FESTIVAL CULTURAL PROGRAM PROJECT SERIES above for further details.

PRAHRAN MARKET | A JOURNEY FROM TEMPORARY OUTDOOR MARKET TO CHEFS’ GOURMET PARADISE with Lesley Sharon Rosenthal 
Wednesday 18 May 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18

In 2014 Prahran Market turned 150 years old. Writer, filmmaker and Market shopper, Lesley Sharon Rosenthal was commissioned to write the Market’s history. Lesley takes us through its fascinating milestones from sawdust floors, horse and carts and the Depression to migrant explosion, birth of delis, foodie entrepreneurs and chef’s gourmet paradise. The Market was a kind of microcosm of Melbourne’s evolving eating habits over the decades as well as a community heartbeat during the changing fortunes of time. Bring along your tastebuds!

LESLEY SHARON ROSENTHAL is a writer and filmmaker who has a love of history. Her films Boutique Magnifique, and Chapel of Chic documenting the history of Collins Street's fashion through its high-end boutiques and Chapel Street’s history of fashion over a hundred years, drew large audiences to ACMI and the Astor Theatre. She has also written Schmattes: Stories of Fabulous Frocks, Funky Fashion and Flinders Lane (2005) documenting Flinders Lane’s colourful history of the rag trade.

MELBOURNE STORIES

COLONIAL STYLE AND FASHIONABLE MELBOURNE with Laura Jocic
Wednesday 27 April 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18

For much of the 19th century Australia was reckoned as a country where there was little need for fashionable dress, yet early visitors to Melbourne commented on the inhabitant’s interest in dress and the plethora of shops which catered for a fashion-conscious clientele. Boosted by the influx of emigrants in the 1850s and a new-found wealth from the goldfields, Melbourne quickly became home to an array of dressmakers, drapers and department stores. Surviving items of dress from the mid-19th to the early-20th century not only attest to the commercial aspect of the clothing industry, but also provide an insight into a society which was finely attuned to the role of fashion as a signifier of prosperity and respectability.

LAURA JOCIC was formerly a curator in the department of Australian Fashion and Textiles at the National Gallery of Victoria where she curated a number of exhibitions including Australian Made: 100 Years of Fashion. She is currently undertaking a PhD at the University of Melbourne, researching dress and its role in Australian colonial society and is also guest curating an exhibition on the artist Louis Kahan’s work in theatre, fashion and art. 

‘A MOST LUXURIOUS STATE’: Men and Music in Jane Austen’s Novels with Gillian Dooley
Tuesday 12 April 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18

In Austen’s novels, musicianship is mainly the preserve of the female sex. The main role of the true gentleman, as far as musicianship is concerned, is to be an appreciative listener. More than once, this is the shortest route to falling in love. But what does this mean for the musical man? 

GILLIAN DOOLEY is Honorary Senior Research Fellow in English at Flinders University, Adelaide, where she also works in the Library. She has published extensively on Jane Austen and a range of other novelists. Her latest book is Never Mind about the Bourgeoisie: The Correspondence between Iris Murdoch and Brian Medlin 1976-1995 (2014).

ROMANCE AT COURT with John Wiltshire
Thursday 9 June 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18

During the months of the King’s madness, courtiers were under virtual house arrest. This talk tells the story of a previously hidden, and ultimately tragic, romantic relationship between Frances and Colonel Digby, the Queen’s vice-chancellor, during this time of intense stress. 

JOHN WILTSHIRE is Emeritus Professor at La Trobe University. He is the author of many books about Jane Austen, among others, and is currently preparing one on Frances Burney and medical experience. 

FANNY BURNEY AT COURT: NEW REVELATIONS

FANNY BURNEY AND ‘MAD KING GEORGE’ with John Wiltshire
Thursday 2 June 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18

Fanny Burney’s journals covering her years at the court of George III are only now being published in full after more than 200 years. This was the time when the King was diagnosed as ‘mad’ and imprisoned. Burney knew more than any other woman how his illness was being treated. This talk focuses on her challenging encounters with her sovereign during his illness and recovery.

THE JANE AUSTEN SERIES 2016
It is 200 years since the first publication of Jane Austen’s Emma by John Murray in December 1815, with the first edition title page impressed in 1816.

The Johnston Collection is celebrating with a year-long programme of activities honouring of the ongoing interpretation of Jane Austen’s works.

A PRINCESS FOR SCOTLAND: MARIE DUCHESS OF HAMILTON with Eugene Barilo von Reisberg POSTPONED - TO BE PRESENTED IN 2017
Tuesday 28 June 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18

Her birth spelled the end of a German princely dynasty; her marriage resulted in the partial loss of her social position; the wayward lives of her children ended the long line of Scottish dukes and led to the ultimately dispersal of family fortunes. The lecture traces the highs and lows in the life and times of Marie, Princess of Baden, Duchess of Hamilton.

QUEEN VICTORIA’S SCOTTISH IDYLL with Eugene Barilo von Reisberg
Wednesday 15 June 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18

Raised on Walter Scott’s romantic novels and Edwin Landseer’s highland paintings, Queen Victoria fell in love with Scotland on her very visit in 1842. Her fascination was shared by her husband, Prince Albert, for whom Scotland reminded of his native Coburg. The construction and interior decoration of Balmoral Castle realised the royal couple’s Scottish fantasies. The lecture explores Victoria and Albert’s love for all things Scottish through their and their contemporaries’ letters, diaries, and works of art.

EUGENE BARILO VON REISBERG STUDY SERIES

EUGENE BARILO VON REISBERG is a Melbourne-based lecturer, researcher, and art consultant with a passion for nineteenth-century art, history, and culture. He is currently completing a doctoral dissertation on Franz Xaver Winterhalter, the 19th century elite portrait specialist, at the University of Melbourne.


FRANZ XAVER WINTERHALTER: At Their Majesty’s Service with Eugene Barilo von Reisberg
Tuesday 10 May 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18

For nearly forty years, from the early 1830s to the early 1870s, Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-73) enjoyed a reputation of the most popular and highly sought-after elite portrait specialist of the era. His contemporaries referred to him as the Painter of Princes and the preferred portraitist of “the upper ten thousand.” He worked for the courts of Paris, London, St Petersburg, Berlin, and Vienna, capturing some of the most famous, powerful, and fascinating characters of the day, imbuing them with effortless glamour and timeless elegance. The lecture incorporates materials from recent scholarly publications and a retrospective exhibition of Winterhalter’s works to provide fresh insights into the artist’s legacy and unlock the secrets of his celebrated portraits. 

SAVAGE NATIONALISM: Tartan from William Wallace to Alexander McQueen with Dorothy Morgan
Wednesday 22 June 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18

Is tartan a fabric or a design, a marketing opportunity or a tool of imperialism, a fashion statement or a subversive weapon, a rallying call to a nation or the means of its oppression? From fierce Caledonian warriors to high fashion runways, tartan is a synonym for Scotland, recognised around the world. How did this humble cloth come into being, change over the centuries, and become such a potent symbol?

DOROTHY MORGAN, an honours history graduate of The University of Melbourne, was Guest Curator of both the exhibition FLOWERING NEEDLES: embroidery from Elizabeth to Victoria, (2010) and the house tour FAIR HALL TO GLAD PARLOUR: The Flower, Its Beauty & Meaning in Art & Ornament (2011). with a particular interest in embroidery and textiles she has presented several lectures on related topics at both The Johnston Collection and other venues.

PUBLIC FIGURES PRIVATE COLLECTORS | THE MACLEAY FAMILY AS COLLECTORS OF NATURAL HISTORY DRAWINGS with Anne Harbers
Tuesday 21 June 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18

Why, at the age of nearly 60, did Alexander Macleay leave his respected life to accept a position in the far-flung colony of New South Wales bringing himself, his wife, his 6 daughters and his insect collection and library to Sydney?

As a well- educated Scot, Alexander Macleay (1767 – 1848) had commenced his career in the British Civil Service in 1795 as a chief clerk in the War office. When Alexander Macleay arrived in Sydney in 1825, to be Colonial Secretary of New South Wales, he was an experienced British Civil Servant and a respected gentleman entomology collector. 

His interest in Natural History had resulted in his insect collection being without parallel in England, with over 9000 specimens and he had been Honorary Secretary of the Linnean Society of London for 27 years. He had close contact with the established collectors of the day, with his cabinet being used by Kirby and Spence in their publications of 1815 – 1826.

ANNE HARBERS is an independent scholar in Art History. She holds a Master research degree in Chemistry and an MBA and for 25 years worked in the field of biotechnology. She is co-author of Jane Austen – Antipodean Views (2001). In 2014, she completed her Masters degree in Art History from the University of Sydney, and is currently enrolled as an external PhD candidate at Radboud Universiteit in Nijmegen, The Netherlands, working on 17th century Dutch art.

This lecture is generously supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection.

PRIDE OF SCOTLAND | A story of Scotland’s unique silver and silversmithing with Ben Staunton
Tuesday 7 June 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18 

The story of Scottish silver is one tied closely to the Scottish identity. From numerous small provincial Scottish outposts that ignored the mandate to send silver into to official assay offices of Edinburgh and Glasgow, to the rejection of some of the more over the top English fashions for a more austere and simple form, Scottish silver speaks of national pride, conservative religion and a unique heritage. Join Ben Staunton as he looks at with a particular focus on Scottish silver of the 18th and 19th centuries.

BEN STAUNTON has been collecting and dealing in antique silver since his high school years. He has a particular focus on Australian Colonial and Provincial silver. He has written and spoken on a range of silver topics and currently serves on the Committee of the Silver Society of Australia. 

IDENTITY AND ROMANCE: THE CELTIC REVIVAL IN JEWELLERY AND OBJECTS with Sophia Errey
Wednedsay 1 June 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18

Dreaming of a glorious past, and challenged by the intricacy of the superb metalwork of the Celts, late 19th century designers were inspired to create jewellery and objects worthy of a Celtic chieftain’s family. In this lecture we will see some of these beautiful pieces and explore the context in which they were made.

SOPHIA ERREY is an artist, art educator and writer. She has lectured widely in the visual arts both historical and contemporary, and has a keen interest in metalwork. Her most recent lecture at the Collection was OF CLOSETS AND DRAWING ROOMS | Spaces, Occasions and Dress (2015).

A JOURNEY TO THE WESTERN ISLANDS OF SCOTLAND with John Byrne
Tuesday 19 April 2016 | 12.00 pm to 1.30 am | $20 / $18

A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland (1775) is a travel narrative by Samuel Johnson about an eighty-three-day journey through Scotland, in particular the islands of the Hebrides, in the late summer and autumn of 1773. The sixty-three-year-old Johnson was accompanied by his thirty-two-year-old friend of many years James Boswell, who was also keeping a record of the trip, published in 1785 as A Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides. The two narratives are often published as a single volume, which is beneficial for comparing two perspectives of the same events, although they are very different in approach - Johnson focused on Scotland, and Boswell focused on Johnson. (Boswell went on to write a famous biography of Johnson.)

JOHN BYRNE is a retired solicitor and founding member of the Johnson Society of Australia. He is currently a Governor of Dr Johnson's House, London, former President of The Johnson Society, Lichfield, England (2008-9), and former President of The Samuel Johnson Society of The West USA (2008-9). He has been a Johnson collector for over four decades and lectured widely in USA, UK and Australia.

THE SECOND SCOTTISH KING OF ENGLAND with Ian George
Wednesday 13 April 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18

Charles I began collecting outstanding art in his youth and became a significant connoisseur. We know what happened to him but what happened to the amazing collection? Dr Ian George will be looking at this question and King Charles’ motives in building the collection.

DR IAN GEORGE has been an art critic since the 1960. His postgraduate work was in aesthetics. Since then he has served on the Visual Arts Committee of the Festival of Perth, as a Trustee of the Queensland Art Gallery and Vice-President of the Queensland Festival, had two terms on the Community Arts Board of the Australia Council and is a regular lecturer at the National Gallery of Australia, the Art Gallery of SA and the National Gallery of Victoria.

‘CRUEL IS THE SNOW THAT SWEEPS GLENCOE’: Glencoe as an emotional landscape with Gordon Raeburn
Thursday 7 April 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18

This lecture will consider the representations of the emotional aftermath of the Massacre of Glencoe in 1692 in various media, including art and song, that were produced between 1692 and the present day. The lecture will investigate the ways in which these emotional representations were and still are projected unto the landscape of Glencoe.

GORDON RAEBURN is as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the CHE University of Melbourne node. He holds a PhD from the University of Durham.His PhD thesis, The Long Reformation of the Dead in Scotland, studied the development of Scottish burial practices between 1542 and 1856, with an eye towards the effects of major societal changes such as the Reformation, the Enlightenment, and the Disruption.He is currently undertaking research on the emotional responses to early modern Scottish disasters, such as plagues and massacres, across the country as a whole between the 15th and 17th centuries.

THE ARCHITECTURAL LEGACY OF THE SCOTS IN THE WESTERN DISTRICT OF VICTORIA with Harriet Edquist
Wednesday 6 April 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18 SOLD OUT

Nineteenth-century Scottish 'pastoralists' in Western Victoria were responsible for one of the most extraordinary episodes in Australian architectural history, the 'Western District homestead', which has almost legendary status in Victoria. 

In a relatively short space of time, from the 1840s to the 1880s, they commissioned hundreds of homesteads, station outbuildings and associated structures to house their burgeoning enterprises. Through these settlements they produced a tight network of family, community and business interests extending from one end of the District to the other and they transformed themselves from economic adventurers into a powerful social and political elite. 

In the following broad survey of the Scottish contribution to Victoria's early architectural history attention will be paid to the Scots as both clients and architects, while first setting the social and economic context of this extraordinary output.

HARRIET EDQUIST is professor of Architectural History in the School of Architecture and Design at RMIT University. She has published extensively on Australian architecture, art and design, with a particular focus on the twentieth century, and has pioneered studies on émigré architects in Melbourne and the Australian Arts and Crafts movement. Her books include The Culture of Landscape Architecture (1994); Frederick Romberg: The Architecture of Migration 1938–1975 (2000); Harold Desbrowe- Annear: A Life in Architecture (2004); Pioneers of Modernism: The Arts and Crafts Movement in Australia (2008) and George Baldessin: Paradox and Persuasion (2009). She curated, with David Hurlston, Shifting gear: Design, Innovation and the Australian Car at the NGV in 2015.

THE FIRST SCOTTISH KING OF ENGLAND with Ian George
Wednesday 30 March 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18

James VI of Scotland was James 1 of England. His concept of monarchy was crucial for the development of today’s monarchy. He was also a significant royal patron of the arts and Dr Ian George will be looking at these things and the upbringing of his son Charles, perhaps the greatest art collector Britain has seen – until the Saatchis!

DR IAN GEORGE has been an art critic since the 1960. His postgraduate work was in aesthetics. Since then he has served on the Visual Arts Committee of the Festival of Perth, as a Trustee of the Queensland Art Gallery and Vice-President of the Queensland Festival, had two terms on the Community Arts Board of the Australia Council and is a regular lecturer at the National Gallery of Australia, the Art Gallery of SA and the National Gallery of Victoria.

REVISITING THE ADAM STYLE: Design, Enlightenment, and Eighteenth-Century Scotland with Suzanne Fraser
Wednesday 23 March 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18

This lecture will re-examine the legacy of neoclassical design innovations in Scotland in the 18th century, with a particular focus on the work of the renowned architect and designer, Robert Adam (1728-92). The lecture will examine several pieces of furniture designed by Adam that are currently held in Australian collections and, in turn, relate these examples to the tastes and collection of William Robert Johnston.

SUZANNE FRASER is a doctoral candidate at the University of Melbourne. Her current project examines the role of Scottish art and visual culture in Australia up to the mid-20th century. She recently contributed to the catalogue, For auld lang syne: images of Scottish Australia from First Fleet to Federation (Inglis and Macdonald, 2014).

MR JOHNSTON(E)’S ALVA with Richard Aitken
Wednesday 16 March 2016 | 10.00 am to 11.30 am | $20 / $18

The painting Alva attributed to Nasmyth in The Johnston Collection plunges us straight into the Scottish countryside of the mid-19th century, replete with Highland estates and wooded glens. Yet there are Australian connections that even William Johnston cannot have known when he purchased this gem for Fairhall. This lecture provides an armchair tour of Scottish gardens suffused with the detective work of the art historian.

RICHARD AITKEN is a Melbourne-based architect, curator, and historian. He has prepared conservation plans for many of Australia’s most significant historic gardens. His books include Cultivating Modernism (2013), The Garden of Ideas (2010), Botanical Riches (2006), Seeds of Change (2006), Gardenesque (2004), and The Oxford Companion to Australian Gardens (2002). He has recently retired as co-editor of Australian Garden History and is currently curating and exhibition for the State Library of NSW and writing a complementary book Planting Dreams, both scheduled for opening / launch in September 2016.

VIRGIN AUSTRALIA MELBOURNE FASHION FESTIVAL CULTURAL PROGRAM PROJECT SERIES 2016
The Johnston Collection is delighted to be a participant in the Virgin Australia Melbourne Fashion Festival's Cultural Program Project Series 2016 with two special lectures in February. RECALLING THE GLAMOUR with Lesley Sharon Rosenthal is on Wednesday, 17 February 2016 and A NEW DRESS FOR EMMA with Lise Rodgers on Thursday 18 February 2016. 

The Virgin Australia Melbourne Fashion Festival is an annual celebration of fashion, beauty, business and creative endeavour for everyone to enjoy.

A NEW DRESS FOR EMMA with Lise Rodgers
Thursday 18 February 2016, 2.00 pm to 3.30 pm $20 / $18

The collaboration of an actress, a costumier and their muse – Jane Austen.

When work started on a new production to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the publication of Emma, it was clear from the beginning that a new costume was essential. This is a conversation that explores its creation and the relationship between words, fabric and performance.

LISE RODGERS is an accomplished Melbourne actress whose career has spanned stage, screen and radio. An interest in the world and characters of Jane Austen is the inspiration behind her series of ‘Jane’ performances.

RECALLING THE GLAMOUR with Lesley Sharon Rosenthal
Wednesday 17 February 2016, 10.00am to 11.30am $20 / $18

Collins Street Melbourne was Australia’s first fashion thoroughfare.  A trip to town and the Paris-end of town was greatly anticipated by generations. Writer and filmmaker, Lesley Sharon Rosenthal, invites us to recall the glamour of times gone by when fashionable Collins Street was famous for its beautiful boutiques and magnificent department stores.

LESLEY SHARON ROSENTHAL is a writer and filmmaker who loves fashion and history. Her feature films Chapel of Chic (2008) about Chapel Street’s evolvement into unique world-famous fashion street and Boutique Magnifique, (2010) documenting Collins Street's history and style through the focus of its once famous high-end boutiques and department stores, depict Melbourne as a stylish city. Lesley has also written SCHMATTES: Stories of Fabulous Frocks, Funky Fashion and Flinders Lane (2005) a book that features stories of Melbourne’s colourful rag trader history.

 

STUDY SERIES: À LA MODE

‘TOO TRUE, TOO PERFECT’| fashion, flowers and botanical knowledge with Peter McNeil
Wednesday 15 July 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

Much world fashion is bound up with botanical knowledge. The flower has been central to fashion’s forms and its supports – textiles – in nearly all cultures. Subject to artful cultivation since ancient times, redolent of passion and hope in the middle ages, cross-cultural transportation and sale in the Renaissance, classification and hybridisation in the Enlightenment, sentiment and eroticism in the nineteenth century, fantasy, femininity and domesticity in the twentieth century, the flower is much more than a motif. Learn how references to floriate forms within fashionable dress contributed to the creation of patterns of thought, fashionability, status, gender, nationhood and regionalism, from the Middle ages to our own time.

PETER McNEIL is Professor of Design History at University of Technology Sydney. One of his great passions is how botanical knowledge and garden history connects with design and material culture. In 2015 he is the writer for a special exhibition on fashion and flowers for the Textile Museum, St Gallen, Switzerland, and his essay on ‘Oscar Wilde and the Green Carnation' will be published in German for a new art-science research grouping in Berlin on plant physiology, culture and literary studies.

This lecture is generously supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection.

A TRIBUTE TO MODERN FASHION ARTISANS with Karen Webster
Wednesday 29 July 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

The contemporary world of fashion is overwhelmed by the impersonalised fast fashion constructs of low prices, high volumes and speed to market processes. By distinction, it is an absolute delight to immerse oneself in the contrasting paradigm of beautifully created pieces, made with care, with attention to detail and personalised for the wearer.  This presentation pays tribute to the modern day artisan who creates bespoke heirloom pieces to be coveted and cherished.

Associate Professor KAREN WEBSTER is the Deputy Head of Fashion and Textiles at RMIT University. She has been a key player and leading academic in Australia’s fashion industry for more than 35 years. She has served as a board director on numerous advisory boards and in 2012 was inducted into the Fashion Hall of Fame in Melbourne.

'The professional dandy and celebrated milliner Richard Nylon', from theloupe.org posted by Monty Coles, 26 February 2010

SPECIAL EVENT
MORE FUN IN THE MILLINERY DEPARTMENT with Richard Nylon and Janice Breen Burns
Wednesday 12 August 2015 at 6.00 to 8.00pm $35

Join Richard Nylon in conversation with Janice Breen Burns as they discuss the development of Nylon’s creative practice of being a milliner - from the start of his career, to the making his very first hat through to establishing a distinguished career as a milliner for Melbourne.  What are the nuances that make a milliner and those touches that reflect the distinct personalities of the wearer and the creator? What makes a ‘signature’ work. Get a glimpse to this other world and share in Nylon’s journey with millinery.

JANICE BREEN BURNS is editor of Voxfrock, the fashion and pop culture blogzine she founded in 2013. For 19 years she was a renowned columnist, features writer, news reporter and fashion editor for Melbourne’s Age newspaper as it evolved from print to multi-platform news source. For 30 years, she has judged Melbourne’s Spring Racing Carnival ‘fashions on the field’ series as well as various fashion and design industry and student competitions. Janice is known to write and comment on fashion in a realistic way.

OF CLOSETS AND DRAWING ROOMS | Spaces, Occasions and Dress with Sophia Errey
Wednesday 12 August 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

Ideas about the distribution of private and public spaces, and which persons are allowed to enter which spaces have varied considerably over time.  Closely linked to this was the formality of dress required for appropriate self presentation to intimates, acquaintances and strangers, formality further modulated by the importance of the event and the time of day.  From handing King Louis his stockings, to hats for the Melbourne Cup, we will explore some of the complex and fascinating rules which governed behaviour in Western societies from the early modern period on.

SOPHIA ERREY is an artist, art educator and writer. Her first doctorate (Melbourne University) on architectural ornament and her interest in the field of ornamentation has continued and expanded with studies in metalwork, ceramics and fashion.

FASHION IN THE DIGITAL AGE | Why this is the most important time in fashion history with Phoebe Montague
Wednesday 26 August 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

We live in an unprecedented time of having information at our fingertips, with the internet opening up the doors of history, so that can draw upon what’s gone before to inform our current choices. Fashion imagery is just a click away, fueling ‘fast fashion’ and making trends last a couple of weeks or months, rather than standing the test of time. So why is this the most important time in fashion history?

PHOEBE MONTAGUE’S fashion commentary and style as Editor of Melbourne based fashion blog ‘Lady Melbourne', has earned her a reputation as one of Australia’s key fashion bloggers. After completing a BA Fine Art (Drawing) from RMIT University, Phoebe started her own accessories label that took her to Sydney and London. Upon her return to Melbourne many years later, she realised a long term goal to study journalism and graduated again from RMIT University in 2009 with a post graduate degree in journalism.

COLONIAL FASHION | Wearing identity with Rebecca Evans
Wednesday 16 September 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

Identity is shaped through the consumption and wearing of dress. This talk focusses on dress in colonial New South Wales and the shaping of a nascent Australian character. Photographs, miniatures, scientific and technological equipment, decorative arts as well as surviving garments made and used in NSW between 1788 and 1901 will be used to explore the significance of fashion and dress in colonial NSW.

REBECCA EVANS is an Assistant Curator at the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences, Sydney and a founding member of the Australian Dress Register. Rebecca has worked on projects including Love Lace: Powerhouse Museum's International Lace Award (2011), A Fine Possession: Jewellery and Identity (2014), and is currently curating an exhibition of Australian colonial dress, opening mid-2016.

This lecture is generously supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection.

FINE FEATHERS MAY MAKE FINE BIRDS, but do they make fine ladies? with Margot Riley
Wednesday 23 September 2015, 10.00 am  11.30 am $20 / $18

For thousands of years people around the world have been adorning themselves with feathers. By the late 19th century, feathers had become a must-have fashion element, ornamenting all manner of garments.  The demand for feathers seemed to know no bounds and bird populations were plundered across Asia, Australia, New Zealand, the USA and throughout Europe, with some species greatly threatened and several made extinct.  By the early 20th century, bird protection laws began to be enacted and, in 1906, Queen Alexandra of England eliminated the use of all feathers and bird trimmings on her hats in one of the earliest celebrity environmental statements ever made.

MARGOT RILEY is a cultural historian with special interest in textiles and dress. From 1992-1994, she completed the Masters in Museum Studies Program at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York and, since her return to Australia, has been working as a Curator with the collections of the State Library of New South Wales in Sydney. 

© May Gibbs, Design for magazine cover, circa 1916, watercolour

FLIGHTS OF FOOD FANTASY | From the First Fleet to Federation with Jacqui Newling
Wednesday 30 September 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

Despite our sophisticated tastes and worldly palates our forebears enjoyed a much wider range of exotica on their tables than we do today. Following long-standing European traditions, all manner of birdlife were welcomed into the Australian pot or indeed, the ubiquitous pastry case, 'four'n'twenty' style.  Spread your culinary wings with Jacqui Newling resident gastronomer at Sydney Living Museums to discover to discover the many ways that feathered food graced our tables in our formative years.

Join JACQUI NEWLING, resident gastronomer at Sydney Living Museums on a culinary flight of fancy.

This lecture is generously supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection

REVEALING AND CONCEALING in the rococo interior with Georgina Cole
Wednesday 7 October 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

The 18th century in France is above all the age of the interior. In architecture, furniture design and decoration there is an explosion of interest in new spaces, forms and techniques. Dramatic changes are made to the layout of the interior; dozens of new types of seating, storage, and surface furniture are devised; and the enhancement of interior surfaces with mirrors, wall lights, and ornament reaches a new height. This lecture explores the extraordinary world of the 18th century interior through architecture, furniture design, and genre painting.  It examines the elite home as a complex network of public and private spaces that accommodated the dual desire for display and retreat. In so doing, it aims to demonstrate that the interior was not just a passive setting for the romantic, political and domestic intrigues of everyday life, but an arena that shaped behaviour and desire.

GEORGINA COLE’s interests include 18th century painting, architecture and art theory. In 2010, she received her doctorate from the University of Sydney with a thesis on doors and other architectural motifs in 18th century genre painting. She is currently working on representations of the five senses in 18th century art. Cole teaches the history of art at the National Art School and the University of Sydney and is a regular presenter at the Art Gallery of New South Wales.

This lecture is generously supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection

FLOWERS, FEATHERS, FASHION with Dorothy Morgan
Wednesday 14 October 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

Man has always decorated himself and his environment using elements from the natural world. However the form this impulse takes can be subject to the vagaries of fashion. From the flamboyant Bird of Paradise to the shy retiring violet, from intrepid plant collectors to explorers driven by commercial imperatives and much between we look at some of the drivers of fashionability and how this has been expressed through objects, some from The Johnston Collection, in man's use of the world of nature.

DOROTHY MORGAN,  an honours history graduate of The University of Melbourne, was Guest Curator of both the exhibition FLOWERING NEEDLES: embroidery from Elizabeth to Victoria, (2010) and the house tour FAIR HALL TO GLAD PARLOUR: The Flower, Its Beauty & Meaning in Art & Ornament (2011). She has lectured on Bess of Hardwicke (2010) and on the life of Mary Granville, Mrs Delany (2013). All have been for The Johnston Collection.

 

THE SYLVIA SAGONA LECTURE 
NAPOLEON'S NEMESIS OR ROMANTIC HEROINE? | The amazing exploits of Germaine de Staël with Sylvia Sagona
Tuesday 18 August 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

As daughter of Louis XVI's exiled Minister of Finance, Anne Louise Germaine de Staël grew up in the vortex of the French Revolution and was determined to leave her stamp on history. Her brilliant conversation and erudition made her salon a magnet for the great thinkers and writers of her day. She penned philosophical tracts which earned her the lasting hatred of Napoleon whom she pursued relentlessly with the idea that they were two superior souls who should be united in marriage. In exile she began penning novels with herself as heroine which introduced the Romantic movement into France and pioneered the first travel novels. When not plotting, talking, traveling or composing she entered into numerous liaisons with famous writers of the time, often many years older or younger, and who, like Napoleon, would do anything to escape her clutches.

SYLVIA SAGONA is an internationally recognised specialist on 19th century French society. She retired from the French Department at The University of Melbourne to work on historical documentaries for French and Australian television and is currently researching a book on the invention of the restaurant in Paris in the 18th century.

THE JANE AUSTEN SERIES 2015
Two Jane Austen milestones occur in 2015. It is 200 years since the first publication of Jane Austen’s Emma by John Murray in December 1815 and it is also the 20th anniversary since Colin Firth, as ‘Mr Darcy’, walked out of the pond in a clinging white shirt in the TV adaptation of Pride and Prejudice.

The Johnston Collection is celebrating with a year-long programme of activities coinciding with these anniversaries and honouring of the ongoing interpretation of her works.

frontispiece from Emma published by John Murray, London, 1815

RE-READING EMMA with John Wiltshire
Thursday 1 October 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $ 18

This talk will explore some of the reasons why Emma, which focuses on ‘two or three families in a country village’, is about so much more, a comedy that is also deeply serious. 

JOHN WILTSHIRE is Adjunct Professor at La Trobe University. He is the author of four books about Jane Austen, and has edited Mansfield Park for the authoritative Cambridge edition. His most recent publications are The Cinematic Jane Austen (2009) and The Making of Dr Johnson (2009). Hidden Jane Austen was published in May 2015.

EMMA: ‘A heroine whom no-one will like’ with John Wiltshire
Thursday 24 September 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $ 18

This talk will introduce Emma - probably Jane Austen’s greatest novel.  The heroine, though, certainly makes some bad mistakes.  How does Jane Austen persuade us to like her? Focusing mainly on the first half of the novel we will compare what is apparently happening with what really is. 

JOHN WILTSHIRE is Adjunct Professor at La Trobe University. He is the author of four books about Jane Austen, and has edited Mansfield Park for the authoritative Cambridge edition. His most recent publications are The Cinematic Jane Austen (2009) and The Making of Dr Johnson (2009). Hidden Jane Austen was published in May 2015.

BY POPULAR DEMAND | GETTING DRESSED WITH JANE AUSTEN with Lise Rodgers 
Thursday 3 September 2015, 2.00 pm to 3.30 pm $20 / $18

a lady is not considered fashionable if she appears in public for two successive days with the same bonnet
a contributor to La Belle Assemblée: Or, Court and Fashionable Magazine, 1806

Using the letters of Jane Austen, some historical background and opinions of the day, let’s throw open the doors of a Georgian wardrobe, and spend an hour or so getting dressed with Jane - from the underwear to the outerwear and beyond!

LISE RODGERS is an accomplished Melbourne actress whose career has spanned stage, screen and radio. An interest in the world and characters of Jane Austen is the inspiration behind her series of Jane performances.

after James Gillray, (England, 1756-1815),
published by Hannah Humphrey (active 1778-1822), The graces in a high wind,
published 26 May 1810, National Portrait Gallery, London, NPG D1294, purchased 1947

JANE AUSTEN’S CHRISTMAS with Lise Rodgers
Friday 16 October 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

“Christmas goes out in fine style – with Twelfth Night. It is a finish worthy of the time. Christmas Day was the morning of the season; New Year’s day the middle of it, or noon; Twelfth night is the night, brilliant with innumerable planets of Twelfth- cakes.”
James Henry Leigh Hunt (1784-1859) | English poet and essayist

A chance to discover Christmas as Jane Austen knew it.

LISE RODGERS is an accomplished Melbourne actress whose career has spanned stage, screen and radio. An interest in the world and characters of Jane Austen is the inspiration behind her series of Jane performances.

THE EUGENE BARILO VON REISBERG LECTURE

DEAR FEO / LIEBER ERNST: Victoria and Albert’s forgotten siblings with Eugene Barilo von Reisberg
Tuesday 13 October 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

Explore the lives of Albert’s brother, Ernst Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, and Victoria’s brother and sister, Charles Prince zu Leiningen, and Feodora Princess zu Hohenlohe-Langenburg, whose destinies were overshadowed by their celebrated siblings on the British throne, but who brought a fair share of warmth and joy, as well as a touch of scandal, into Victoria and Albert’s lives. 

EUGENE BARILO VON REISBERG is a writer, researcher, and art consultant. He is an internationally acknowledged authority on Franz Xaver Winterhalter, the 19th century elite portrait specialist, and he is currently completing a doctoral thesis on the artist at the University of Melbourne.

Sir William Ross (1794-1860) Portrait of Princess Feodora zu Hohenlohe-Langenburg (1807-1872), 1838 watercolour on ivory, Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2015, (RCIN 420416)

NEW | MELBOURNE STORIES

SELLING THE DREAM IN COLONIAL MELBOURNE with Edwin Barnard

Tuesday 15 September 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18​ 

By the mid 1860s Melbourne had become Australia's most populous city, its vibrant commercial life revealed in advertisements from newspapers, magazines and handbills. When it came to gentle the art of persuasion, it seems that colonial copywriters had little to learn from their modern counterparts.

Join Edwin Barnard for a day out in late 19th century Melbourne, exploring the bargains on offer at the likes of Skinner's Crinoline Bazaar and Nathan's Furniture Emporium (where they even offered that new-fangled time-payment scheme).

EDWIN BARNARD is an author and designer with an enduring interest in the everyday lives of 19th century Australians. His most recent books—Emporium, Selling the Dream in Colonial Australia, Exiled and Capturing Time—have all been published by the National Library of Australia.

This lecture is generously supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection

after Thomas Walter Wilson (England, 1851 – 1912) from a sketch by Melton Prior (England, 1845-1910)  “The Block” in Collins Street, Melbourne, circa 1889 engraved by Paul Hermann Naumann (Germany,1851 - 1897; fl) for the Illustrated London News, 4 January 1890

CHARACTERS OF MELBOURNE with Stephen Banham
Tuesday 29 September 2015, 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18

If a city can be recognised by its architecture, why not also by its typography? In this illustrated talk Banham plays detective, sharing amazing untold stories behind some of Melbourne’s best loved public signage – from the Herald Sun Building’s majestic uppercase letters, to Richmond’s ‘Neon Quartet’ (the Skipping Girl, Nylex clock, Pelaco and Slade Knitwear signs). His interest in signage spans the celebrated, the vanished, the hidden and the forgotten. Above all it is a celebration of the deep cultural significance of typography.

STEPHEN BANHAM is a typographer, writer, lecturer and founder of Letterbox, a typographic studio based in Melbourne. After three years or writing and research, ‘Characters: Revealing cultural stories through typography’ was co-published by the State Library of Victoria and Thames and Hudson in 2011. In the same year Banham was made a Creative Fellow at the State Library of Victoria. He has a Masters in Design Research and is currently doing a practice-based invitational PhD.

LECTURES & WORKSHOPS

THE HUNT & THE CHASE: field sports in Victorian, Edwardian and modern England with John Bryne
Wednesday 20 October 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

For a small and heavily populated landmass the British Isles is blessed with a wide variety of game and so field sports are immensely popular. Fox hunting, "The unspeakable in full pursuit of the uneatable" (Oscar Wilde) is, today, the most visible and controversial of all these pastimes. With it`s strange rituals, clothing and language it can seem it can seem an alien world yet it is one which has influenced our language, culture and literature immensely.

John Byrne rode to the hounds with The West Australian Hunt Club in the 1960`s and has hunted and fished in many countries. In this lecture he will tell you about the history of fox hunting, explain some of the rituals and customs of this ancient pastime. He will tell you of his adventures in the field and display books and objects from his collection on field sports.

JOHN BYRNE is a retired solicitor and founding member of the Johnson Society of Australia. He is currently a Governor of Dr Johnson's House, London, former President of The Johnson Society, Lichfield, England (2008-9), and former President of The Samuel Johnson Society of The West USA (2008-9). He has been a Johnson collector for over four decades and lectured widely in USA, UK and Australia.

George Stubbs (England, 1724 – 1806) Ringwood, a Brocklesby Foxhound, 1792

NOTABLE CONNOISSEUR’S MUSEUMS | European and American Parallels to The Johnston Collection with William Johnston
Wednesday 2 September 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

What traits do connoisseur’s collections share? What pleasures do house museums (as distinct from major museums and English country houses) offer that larger institutions cannot? What motivates a collector to convert a house into a museum? This lecture will explore peculiarities of a dozen house-collections (assembled by aesthetes between 1850 and 1930) in the north-eastern United States, England, France, Belgium, and Italy. It will emphasize similarities to The Johnston Collection.

WILLIAM M JOHNSTON grew up near the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. As a Professor of History at the University of Massachusettts, he has written four books on the cultural history of Austria and another on art connoisseurs in Italy (In Search of Italy 1987). Since 2000 he has lived in Melbourne, where he lectures frequently on Dante.

THE QUEEN’S PRIVATE DIAMOND COLLECTION with Adrian Dickens
Thursday 6 August 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

Australian jeweller Adrian Dickens went to see Diamonds: A Jubilee Celebration at Buckingham Palace and was inspired to create a presentation that tells us about the history and craftsmanship of these diamonds from a jeweller’s point of view.

His illustrated presentation offers a different perspective on the British Monarchy, and an insight to many of the more familiar personal pieces owned and worn with regularity by the Queen, and other senior members of the Royal Family.

Learn how diamonds are reworked to reflect changes in fashion. Hear the stories behind the Russian tiaras; necklaces from India; and the great South African diamonds. Discover the political role of Queen Victoria’s diadem. Understand how the Queen, Camilla and now Kate use diamonds to express political power.

ADRIAN DICKENS trained in the United Kingdom for six years and has been a fixture on the Melbourne and Sydney fine jewellery scene for over 30 years. Adrian’s knowledge of historical and recent jewellery trends are insightful. He regularly gives talks and presentations nationally and internationally. He has managed some of Australia’s fine jewellery houses and now runs Circa AD Jewels.

Sir William Dargie (Australia, 1912 – 2003)  portrait of Queen Elizabeth II, 1954 The National Museum of Australia, Canberra, 1955

A PORCELAIN CASEBOOK: It’s all there in Blue and White with Stephen Bowers (Winston Churchill Memorial Trust (South Australia) Fellow 2014
Wednesday 22 July 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

Stephen Bowers uses craft traditions from east and west to create works that reflect a distinctly contemporary Antipodean consciousness. His richly detailed ceramics are often covered with surreal combinations of elements. His designs may include references to blue and white china, natural history illustration and textile design, along with motifs drawn from memories of growing up in Australia during the 50’s and 60’s.

This illustrated lecture draws on a recent Churchill Fellowship to take the audience on a personal journey of exploration into some of the rich history and creative processes of ceramics, especially the making of blue and white, including painting and transfer wares with reference to 18th and 19th century traditions and innovations, as well as touching on his own work.

STEPHEN BOWERS is an Australian ceramic artist. His work is represented in public collections nationally and internationally.In 2014 Stephen Bowers received a Winston Churchill Memorial Trust (South Australia) Fellowship to undertake research of collections of blue and white ceramics in the USA, the UK and the Netherlands.

This lecture is generously supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection

Chocolate, Women & Empire | A Social History of Chocolate with Emma Robertson
Thursday 28 May 2015, 10.00 to 11.30 am $20 / $18

From Charlie and the Chocolate Factory to Chocolat, from romantic gift to guilty indulgence, chocolate has a special place in Western popular culture. But what are the hidden histories behind this luxurious commodity? This illustrated lecture examines chocolate production from cocoa bean to chocolate box, illuminating the dynamics of gender, race and empire which have structured the cocoa chain.

Using a varied range of sources, and drawing on the author’s own relationship to the industry, this talk reconnects the people and places at different stages of chocolate production. Emma Robertson stresses the need to recognise the complex histories of empire and labour which have made such pleasurable consumption possible.

DR EMMA ROBERTSON is Lecturer in History at La Trobe University. Her book Chocolate, Women and Empire: A Social and Cultural History was published by Manchester University Press in 2009. Dr Robertson has worked as a researcher at the Universities of Leeds Metropolitan and Loughborough in the United Kingdom and is a regular contributor to CocoaReworks, a website dedicated to the experiences of women who worked at the Rowntree confectionery factory in York, England.

photographer unknown, Hand-packing chocolate assortments at Rowntree & Co., York, undated, personal collection (courtesy of Joe Dickinson)

 

Discovering Australian Flora | The Audience For Botanical illustrations with Jennifer Jones-O’Neill
Tuesday 26 May 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

The international interest in the wonderfully exotic flora of Australia during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century led to numerous publications that traversed the scientific to the popular. This illustrated lecture looks at the role of, and demand for, botanical illustrations of Australian plants. The publication, translation and distribution of these images inspired rich growth and diversity in many European gardens.

JENNIFER JONES-O’NEILL is Head, School of Arts at Federation University and her research is in the area of visual culture and the history of ideas with a particular focus on the eighteenth century. Her research has resulted in publications and presentations on the visual representation of sensibility, melancholy and genius. 

John CURTI S, H WE DDELL, engravers, S CURTI S publisher Crinum flaccidum, 1820, plate 2133, from Curtis’s Botanical Magazine Art Gallery of Ballarat, purchased with funds from the Hilton White Bequest, 2011

Road Skates And A History Of The World with Valerie Krips
Wednesday 20 May 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

When Neil MacGregor and the BBC produced a series of programmes about the history of the world told through 100 museum objects, radio was, rather surprisingly, their chosen medium. 

The result was an astonishing success. Many thousands of objects were uploaded to the website, including these road skates. This talk discusses the choice of radio as a medium, and the objects chosen to provide a history of the world, and of individual lives. 

VALERIE KRIPS, who lives in Melbourne, retired from the University of Pittsburgh in 2006. She is a Fellow in the School of Culture and Communication at the University of Melbourne. Her book Perfect Charity, written with Mary Clark and Heather O’Conner, was published by Morning Star Publishing in 2013.

invented by Mr Ritter, (Switzerland / England), manufactured by The Road Skate Company, 271 Oxford St, London, Ritter Road Skates, England, around 1897 - 1898, owned by Charles Goodman Tebbutt, Bluntisham, Cambridgeshire, image courtesy A History of The World Objects, BBC blog

 

Fanny Burney| Her family, her fame, her fortitude with John Bryne
Tuesday 12 May 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am

Fanny Burney (1752-1840) came from a famous family. Her father was a renown musician and author, her brother James accompanied. Cook on his third voyage and witnessed his death. Her novels were the sensation of the age, praised by Dr. Johnson and deeply influenced Jane Austen. She married a French general, was at the Battle of Waterloo and survived a mastectomy. Throughout her long life she kept a journal which gives us an unrivaled picture of her age. John Byrne will tell you her story and display books, letters and etchings from his collection.

JOHN BYRNE is a retired solicitor and founding member of the Johnson Society of Australia. He is currently a Governor of Dr Johnson's House, London, former President of The Johnson Society, Lichfield, England (2008-9), and former President of The Samuel Johnson Society of The West USA (2008-9). He has been a Johnson collector for over four decades and lectured widely in USA, UK and Australia.

after an original by Edward Francesco Burney (1760-1848), engraved by Charles Turner (1773 -1857), published by Paul and Dominic Colnaghi & Co (active 1830-1890), Frances d’Arblay (‘Fanny Burney’) (1752-1840), published 16 May 1840, mezzotint on paper, National Portrait Gallery, London, acquired Martin Collection, 1861 (Reference Collection NPG D930)

The Enchanted Garden In Renaissance England with Luke Morgan
Tuesday 5 May 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

This lecture focuses on key examples of landscape design in Elizabeth and Jacobean England.  It will compare actual gardens with literary ones such as Spenser’s ‘Bower of Bliss’  in The Faerie Queene and Prospero’s island in Shakespeare’s The Tempest. In English Renaissance literature, gardens are often depicted as seductive lairs of fatal enchantresses.  This lecture will explore the possibility that similar ideas informed the responses of visitors to actual gardens of the period.

DR LUKE MORGAN is a Senior Lecturer in Art History & Theory at Monash University.  His books include Nature as Model: Design (2007) and The Monster in the Garden: The Grotesque  and the Gigantic in Renaissance Landscape Design (2015), both published by the University of Pennsylvania Press.  His current research on English Renaissance gardens is funded by an Australian Research Council Discovery Project grant.

The Elizabethan Garden, newly recreated by English Heritage, at Kenilworth Castle, Warwickshire

“Not To Modern Taste” | The Pleasures and Problems of Defining Decoration with Sophia Errey
Wednesday 29 April 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

Is Grinling Gibbon’s Cravat “a tasteless exercise in superhuman skill”? How has 'modern' taste encouraged us to regard ornament and decoration as relegated to an inferior role as ‘craft’ rather than ‘art’? Why is ornament feared as inappropriately seductive? By exploring some of the debates around these issues we can come to better appreciate the role crafted objects play in our lives.

SOPHIA ERREY is an artist, art educator and writer. Her first doctorate (The University of Melbourne) on architectural ornament, and her interest in the field of ornamentation has continued and expanded with studies in metalwork, ceramics and fashion.

Grinling Gibbons (England, 1648 - 1721), untitled carving (Cravat), London, circa 1690, Limewood, with raised and openwork carving, Victoria & Albert Museum, London, W.181:1-1928, gift of The Hon Mrs Walter Levy

The Spirituality Of Modern Art with Ian George
Wednesday 8 April 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am

Art Historians and critics tend to ignore the powerful currents of religious and theological thought so prevalent from 1860 – 1960 which we regard as the period of the modernists. 

Almost every major artist of this period was involved in these currents of thought and this is reflected in their work. We shall look at this process in some of the major modernists.

DR IAN GEORGE has been an art critic since the 1960. His postgraduate work was in aesthetics. Since then he has served on the Visual Arts Committee of the Festival of Perth, as a Trustee of the Queensland Art Gallery and Vice-President of the Queensland Festival, had two terms on the Community Arts Board of the Australia Council and is a regular lecturer at the National Gallery of Australia, the Art Gallery of SA and the National Gallery of Victoria.

Franz Marc (Germany, 1880 – 1916) Die großen blauen Pferde (The Large Blue Horses), 1911
Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, 1942.1, gift of the T B Walker Foundation and the Gilbert M Walker Memorial Fund

In The Writer's House Museum | Victor Hugo’s Hauteville House with Bertrand Bourgeois
Thursday 26 March 2015, 10.00 am tyo 11.30 am $20 / $18

This illustrated lecture on Victor Hugo’s Hauteville House will showcase this fascinating writer’s house, a place that he bought with Juliette Drouet on 16 May 1856 and where he lived until 1870. 

A less known fact is that he designed and decorated the entire house according to his own imagination. Bourgeois will claim that Hauteville House can be seen as one more work of art, almost a living novel, of the multifarious writer.

BERTRAND BOURGEOIS is a lecturer at The University of Melbourne and is an expert in house-museums, having written a book entitled Poétique de la maison-musée (1847-1898) (Paris, L’Harmattan, 2007) focusing on real and fictional 19th century French house-museums. 

NEW | MELBOURNE STORIES

'Whelan The Wrecker Was Here' with Robyn Annear SOLD OUT
Thursday 14 May 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

The demolition firm of Whelan the Wrecker was a Melbourne institution for a hundred years (1892-1992). Its famous sign – 'Whelan the Wrecker is Here' on a pile of shifting rubble - was a laconic masterpiece and served as a vital sign of the city's progress.

Using demolition sites as portals, Robyn Annear explores layers of the city laid bare by Whelan’s, bringing to light stories about the making – and remaking – of a city.

ROBYN ANNEAR lives and works in Castlemaine, writing when she finds time, otherwise collecting dust.

R McInnes photographer, Building at 64 La Trobe Street, 1955, Argus Newspaper collection of photographs, State Library of Victoria, Melbourne, Pictures Collection, H2002.199/671, gift of The Age (Melbourne), 1976

 

Remembering Georges with Annette Cooper SOLD OUT
Wednesday 17 June 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

When Georges closed its doors on 5 October 1995, it had been trading for 115 years. Yet this famous department store, situated in the ‘Paris End’ of Collins Street, still lingers in the minds of many today. Remembering Georges brings together the memories of these people in a richly illustrated book, reflecting the style and elegance of the store itself.

In her talk, Annette Cooper will give a brief overview of Georges’ history, how she came to write the book, the people she interviewed, and some of the ‘gems’ she came across during the process of research. The talk will be accompanied by a selection of images from her book.

ANNETTE COOPER has Bachelor Degrees in Arts and Science, and has worked at the National Gallery of Victoria and the ABC. She has had a lifelong interest in Melbourne’s social and architectural history, especially the landscape of the city, as well as being a devoted client of Georges. Her book, Remembering Georges, was published by Melbourne Books in 2014.

photographer unknown, Georges, Collins Street, Melbourne, circa 1913 – 1920, State Library of Victoria, Melbourne, Pictures Collection, H2004.89/25, purchased 2004

THE JANE AUSTEN SERIES 2015

Two Jane Austen milestones occur in 2015. It is 200 years since the first publication of Jane Austen’s Emma by John Murray in December 1815 and it is also the 20th anniversary since Colin Firth, as ‘Mr Darcy’, walked out of the pond in a clinging white shirt in the TV adaptation of Pride and Prejudice.

The Johnston Collection is celebrating with a year-long programme of activities coinciding with these anniversaries and honouring of the ongoing interpretation of her works.

frontispiece from Emma published by John Murray, London, 1815

The Fortunes Of The Enigmatic Mr Darcy with John Wiltshire
Thursday 4 June 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

Every one today knows Mr Darcy.  But it was a long time before even readers of Pride and Prejudice, fascinated by Elizabeth Bennet, gave him a second glance.  This talk will explore some of the many different conceptions of the figure, and especially focus on his most recent visual incarnations. Is he rude and pompous, or shy and sexy - or both?

JOHN WILTSHIRE is Emeritus Professor at La Trobe University. He is the author of four books about Jane Austen, and has edited Mansfield Park for the authoritative Cambridge edition. Among his recent publications are The Cinematic Jane Austen (2009) and The Making of Dr Johnson (2009). The Hidden Jane Austen was published in May 2014.

Colin Firth cast as ‘Mr Darcy’ in the TV adaptation of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice (directed by Simon Langton, BBC, 1995)

 

THE INVENTION OF LEISURE

In 19th century Paris bankers and the new class of bourgeois businessmen thronged the boulevards flaunting their new but unstable notoriety. However, the real sophistication they craved was not based on money alone but on the ability to show they understood the old aristocratic code of conspicuous leisure.

The boom in industrial progress and the invention of the railroad meant they could upstage the old sojourns at the spas and develop the first seaside resorts. A new style of mistress emerged to accommodate the need for conspicuous consumption paraded on the Cote d ‘Azur.

While the expensive courtesans strutted the boulevards, the bourgeois wives developed the cult of the household pet, whose fidelity replaced the distant publicity-seeking husband. This lecture series will look at these images of modernity created by the artists of the time.

SYLVIA SAGONA is an internationally recognised specialist on 19th century French society. She retired from the French Department at The University of Melbourne to work on historical documentaries for French and Australian television and is currently researching a book on the invention of the restaurant in Paris in the 18th century.

Frédéric Hugo d’Alesi (France, 1849–1906) advertising poster for PLM Trains, L’hiver a Nice, Services Rapides entre Paris et Nice (Winter in Nice, Quick Service between Paris and Nice), circa 1895

Courtesans And Conspicuous Consumption with Sylvia Sagona
Thursday 7 May 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

The middle of the 19th century saw the rise of an aristocracy of prostitutes who swept across the city and resorts in a cloud of diamonds leaving destruction in their wake. These Grandes Horizontales, immortalised in the literature, art and opera of the time, were so expensive that men spent their daughters’ dowries on them, fought duels for their favours and shared them with other men desperate to be seen as so successful that they could afford these fabulous creatures. It was less about sex than sensationalism.

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres (France, 1780–1867) Grande Odalisque, 1814, Louvre Museum, Paris, RF.1158, acquired 1899,

Discovering The Seaside with Sylvia Sagona
Thursday 23 April 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

The Duc de Morny, Napoleon III’s half brother established Deauville as a resort where balls and promenades could continue during summer and as a centre for the fashionable pursuit of horse racing he had established in France. Meanwhile, the French had annexed Nice and so began frequenting the Cote d’Ázur which the British had made popular to escape their damp climate. New industries sprang up in the wake of the popularity of travel; railway restaurants such as the Train bleu, luggage such as Louis Vuitton and new fashions for women. Artists from Renoir to Matisse depicted this new idea of leisure.

James Tissot (France, 1836–1902), Ball on shipboard, 1874, Tate Britain, London, N04892, presented by the Trustees of the Chantrey Bequest 1937

The Beast In The Boudoir with Sylvia Sagona
Thursday 16 April 2015, 10.00 am to 11.30 am $20 / $18

Aristocrats had always kept hunting dogs but in the 19th century a new category of animal companion was created; the household pet. These non-working animals mirrored the situation of their boudoir-bound bourgeois owners; faithful, decorative and affectionate. This new way of perceiving animals had a parallel in the anti-vivisectionist movement .Impressionist canvases in particular show dogs, cats and parrots and their close ties with humans.

Alfred-Émile-Léopold Stevens (Belgium, 1823–1906),  Departing for the Promenade (Will You Go Out with Me, Fido?), 1859, Philadelphia Museum of Art, W1893-1-106, The W P Wilstach Collection, bequest of Anna H Wilstach, 1893

Virgin Australia Melbourne Fashion Festival Cultural Program Project Series 2015

We are delighted to announce that we are a participant in the Virgin Australia Melbourne Fashion Festival's Cultural Program Project Series 2015 with two special lectures at The Johnston Collection in February. Fashion in Literature - Out Loud with Lise Rodgers is on Thursday 19 February and 1980s Fashion | From the Street to the Museum with Dr Peter McNeil on Tuesday 24 February 2015.


The Virgin Australia Melbourne Fashion Festival is an annual celebration of fashion, beauty, business and creative endeavour for everyone to enjoy.

 

1980s FASHION | From the Street to the Museum
Tuesday 24 February 2015, 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18

This lecture considers the role of historicism and the reworking of 'classics' or fashion types as a means to generate new meanings for fashion. Vivienne Westwood is the focus, a designer whose process is informed by surviving artefacts, representations of dress, and allusion to history, zeitgeist (mood), and socio-cultural change. The clothes that emerge are never copies but fantasies of fashion moments that are mythical and romantic. The unity of pre-war dressing is replaced by the fragmentation of the body. The shoes no longer have to match the bag.

DR PETER McNEIL is Professor of Design History at the University of Technology Sydney and Distinguished Professor, Aalto University, Finland. He is the author of numerous publications including ten works on fashion, including the best-selling Shoes, also translated into Italian (with Giorgio Riello 2006; 2011). Current book projects include the ‘long’ history of luxury, supported by the UK Leverhulme Trust and fashion writing from the 17th century to the present day.

Vivienne Westwood, 1994 S/S Collection: Cafe Society

FASHION IN LITERATURE - OUT LOUD | 3 ladies of style: 3 authors, 3 eras, 3 continents
Thursday 19 February 2015, 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18

Descriptions of what a character is wearing can be so evocative of their personality and lifestyle, so rich with information about times gone by. At the mention of silks and chiffons, exotic colours or haute couture we sigh with admiration, imagining, as we turn the page, a world of perfect beauty. But life is not always what it seems behind a beautifully dressed façade.

LISE RODGERS is an accomplished Melbourne actress whose career has spanned stage, screen and radio. Widely known for her ongoing Jane Austen series of performances, it is her passion for the spoken word that has inspired this new venture – Literature Out Loud.

The Huguenot Artistic Tradition In Australia with Robert Nash 
Friday 24 October 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18

The Huguenots were well known in France, and countries of exile, for their contribution to the fine and decorative arts. In Australia this tradition was continued by their descendants.

This talk will concentrate on four artists in particular: Benjamin Duterrau (1767-1851), Louis Buvelot (1814-1888), William Piguenit (1836-1914) and Jean Bellette (1908-1991). It will also look briefly at the role of Huguenot descendants (Lady Jane Franklin, Charles La Trobe, Eccleston Du Faur) in the patronage and encouragement of the arts as a social good, and at Huguenot contribution to the newer art forms of photography and film (Townsend Duryea, Harold Cazneaux, Godfrey Cass and Charles Chauvel).

ROBERT NASH is Secretary of the Huguenot Society of Australia. A descendant of Huguenot silk weavers, he was educated at Oxford and Cambridge. Nash has published numerous historical articles on Australian Huguenot genealogy and descendants, and is the editor of the book, The Hidden Thread | Huguenot Families in Australia (2009)

This lecture is generously supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection

Amelie Romilly (1788-1875), Portrait of Jane, Lady Franklin (1792-1875) 1816, collection of National Portrait Gallery, London, bequest of the sitter's niece, Miss Sophia Cracroft, 1892, NPG 904

THE JANE AUSTEN SERIES 2014 | MANSFIELD PARK 1814

To mark the 200 years since the first publication of Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park by Thomas Egerton in May 1814, The Johnston Collection is celebrating with a year-long programme of activities coinciding with the bicentenary and the honouring of her work.


frontispiece from Mansfield Park published by Thomas Edgerton, London, 1814

No Moral Effect On The Mind: Music in Mansfield Park with Gillian Dooley
Thursday 28 August 2014 12.00 pm to 1.30 pm  $20 / $18

This talk will firstly talk about the way Austen uses music and musicianship in Mansfield Park to illuminate but not to define her characters, and how 18th century ideas about women’s education feed into the novel. Secondly she will discuss the Austen family music collections, particularly the music manuscripts in Jane Austen’s hand, and the music that she played and sang.

GILLIAN DOOLEY is Honorary Senior Research Fellow in English at Flinders University, Adelaide, where she is also Special Collections Librarian. She has published extensively on Jane Austen and a range of other novelists. Her latest book is J.M. Coetzee and the Power of Narrative (2010).

Rose Adélaïde Ducreux (France, 1761 - 1802), Self-portrait with harp, circa 1791, collection Metropolitan Museum of Art New York Citybequeast of Susan Dwight Bliss, 1967.55.1

“With Ships & Sailors, She Felt Herself At Home” with Lise Rodgers
Thursday 11 September 2014 2.00 pm to 3.30 pm $20 / $18

With two brothers serving in the British Navy, Jane Austen wrote comfortably and with confidence, as she introduced into her novel Mansfield Park images of ports, docks, sloops and frigates, Admirals, Captains, Midshipmen and Lieutenants.

As always, she only wrote about what she knew and in doing so, both her letters and the novel afford us great insight into the world of the sailor and the families who waited for them at home.

LISE RODGERS is an accomplished Melbourne actress whose career has spanned stage, screen and radio. An interest in the world and characters of Jane Austen is the inspiration behind her series of Jane performances.

detail from George Hodge his Book Consisting of Difrint ports & ships that I have sailed in since the year 1790. Aged 13 years

Mansfield Park 1814 with John Wiltshire
Tuesday 7 October 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18

2014 marks the two hundredth anniversary of the publication of Mansfield Park, the most ambitious, most challenging and controversial of Jane Austen's novels. In this talk John will discuss some of those controversies and suggest a new way of understanding the character of its unusual heroine, Fanny Price.

JOHN WILTSHIRE is Adjunct Professor at La Trobe University. He is the author of four books about Jane Austen, and has edited Mansfield Park for the authoritative Cambridge edition. His most recent publications are The Cinematic Jane Austen (2009) and The Making of Dr Johnson (2009). Hidden Jane Austen was published in May 2014.

See also John Wiltshire’s other lecture SIR JOSHUA & THE DOCTOR below.

after John Preston Neale (1780–1847), engraved by T Barber, published by Jones & Co., from Views of the Seats of Noblemen and Gentlemen in England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland, ‘ADLESTROP, Gloucestershire’, London, 1831

Between Tradition & Modernity
Thursday 23 October 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18

In the early 1870s, a small group of renegade artists, headed by Edouard Manet and Auguste Renoir, redefined the nature of society portraiture. They inspired a new generation of painters, such as Theo van Rysselberghe, Kees van Dongen, Amedeo Modigliani, and Gustave Klimt to introduce an increasingly diverse and innovative range of styles into the portraiture genre. However, the grand tradition of society portraiture was not abandoned, and continued surviving in the grandiose creations of Sir John Everett Millais, John Singer Sargent, Giovanni Boldini, Valentin Serov, and Philip de Laszlo.

EUGENE BARILO VON REISBERG is a writer, researcher, and art consultant. He is an internationally acknowledged authority on Franz Xaver Winterhalter, the 19th century elite portrait specialist, and he is currently completing a doctoral thesis on the artist at the University of Melbourne.

See also Eugene Barilo von Reisberg’s other lecture QUEEN VICTORIA'S MAHARAJAH | The many lives of Duleep Singh above.

Giovanni Boldini (1842-1931), Portrait of Consuelo, Duchess of Marlborough, with Her Son, Lord Ivor Spencer-Churchill, 1906, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY, gift of Consuelo Vanderbilt Balsan, 1946 (47.71)

The Ecstasy Of Tea And Porcelain with Robyn Ives
Tuesday 14 October 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18

Tea was an exotic beverage that reached the West initially from China, and brought with it luminous, resonant porcelain.  The combination of tea and porcelain influenced social habits and fuelled demand for new objects to accommodate the ever-changing fashion of taking tea. Robyn Ives will explore the impact of tea and how furnishing the equipage for tea drinking revolutionised English ceramics production. 

ROBYN IVES is President of the Wedgwood Society of Australia. She is a collector and lecturer with an extensive knowledge of Wedgwood of all periods and styles. 18th century Wedgwood comes within her particular interest in Post Medieval English pottery.

Worcester porcelain factory Worcester, (est. 1751 - 2009) teacup and saucer, England, circa 1772
The Johnston Collection (2013), bequest of Alwynne Jona OAM, Ambassador to The Johnston Collection

Head For The Hills | Mt Macedon meets the Raj with Stephen Ryan 
Wednesday 8 October 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18

Stephen Ryan will talk about the lifestyle of the rich and famous who were attracted to and established themselves in the higher altitudes of Mt Macedon, as they emulated their British counterparts in the Indian subcontinent in the 1800's. He will discuss the inspiration to create expansive colonial ‘hill station’ style gardens surrounding their homes. He will also look at the phenomenon that inspired these places of leisure and retreat from the blistering heat of long Victorian summers.

STEPHEN RYAN, horticulturalist, author and broadcaster, started working in his father's nursery, Dicksonia Rare Plants, at the age of ten and at the same time joined the Mt Macedon Horticultural Society. He has been a passionate plant collector ever since. Stephen is best known for his role as host on ABC Television's Gardening Australia. He lectures and holds seminars both nationally and internationally. As a plant hunter and traveller, he has travelled to many places in the world as varied as Namibia, India, Oregon, England, Ireland, South Africa, Peru, Argentina, New Guinea and France.

Duneira, Mt Macedon photograph by Kim Selby | courtesy of Duneira

Masters Of The ‘Speaking Likeness’
Thursday 25 September 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $20 / $18

During the first half of the 19th century, British portrait painters continued celebrating the grandeur of the British monarchy and the elegance of the court beauties. At the same time, their counterparts in France and Spain, during the turbulent era of wars, revolutions, and political upheavals, were forced to adapt their brush to a quickly changing social environment.

The confluence of two major art movements of the era, Neoclassicism and Romanticism, allowed them to capture these changes in visually exciting and innovative ways. Jacques Louis David, Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, François Gérard, J A D Ingres, Thomas Lawrence, William Beechey, and Francisco Goya are just some of the artists to be discussed in this lecture.

François Gérard (1770-1837), Portrait of Louise-Antoinette, Duchesse de Montebello, with her Children, 1814, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, purchased with funds provided by the Brown Foundation Accessions Endowment Fund and the Alice Pratt Brown Museum Fund

Indian Accent | European style in India with Ian Stephenson
Wednesday 10 September 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18

Using furniture as a springboard, Ian Stephenson will explore the principal styles introduced by European into India in the 19th century and their use in interiors, architecture and monuments.

IAN STEPHENSON is the Curator at the University of New England. He was formerly Senior Curator at the National Trust (NSW), Director Historic Places (ACT) and CEO of the National Trust (SA) He is a Board member NSW National Trust and a Trustee of the Copland Foundation.Ian has curated many exhibitions, lectured on historic houses and their collections and published numerous articles on architectural history.

This lecture is generously supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection

Armchair, Kodaikanal, Tamil Nadu

A Painter In Revolutionary Times | John Singleton Copley and the American Revolution, 1760-1800 with Peter McPhee
Wednesday 3 September 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18

This lecture tells the harrowing story of an outstanding portraitist caught in the deadly divisions of Revolution. Copley, born to poor Irish parents in Boston, became a highly sought-after painter of the élites of this small colonial port.

Increasing friction between Britain and her American colonies after 1763 polarised this élite into warring camps. Copley found himself caught between old friends and family and by 1774 had to make a choice which would change his life tragically and permanently.

PETER McPHEE is a Professorial Fellow at the University of Melbourne, where he was the university's first provost. He has published widely on the history of modern France, including most recently Living the French Revolution, 1789-1799.

John Singleton Copley (USA / England, 1738 1815), self-portrait, 1780-84, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, gift of the Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation with matching funds from the Smithsonian Institution, NPG.77.22

Queen Victoria's Maharajah | The many lives of Duleep Singh with Eugene Barilo von Reisberg
Wednesday 30 July 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18

Fascinated by one of Franz Xaver Winterhalter’s most exotic paintings, Portrait of Maharajah Duleep Singh, Eugene Barilo von Reisberg delved into the sitter’s biography and uncovered a fascinating tale of an Indian child prince; the legend of the fabled Koh-i-Noor diamond, one of the most important jewels in the British Royal Collection; and the Indian presence at the court of Queen Victoria, the first British monarch to be formally styled the Empress of India.

EUGENE BARILO VON REISBERG is a writer, researcher, and art consultant. He is an internationally acknowledged authority on Franz Xaver Winterhalter, the 19th century elite portrait specialist, and he is currently completing a doctoral thesis on the artist at the University of Melbourne.

See also Eugene Barilo von Reisberg’s lecture series CAPTURING GLAMOUR | Society portraiture during the long 19th century, 1789-1914 below.

Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-1873), The Maharaja Duleep Singh (1838-93), 1854, The Royal Collection, England, RCIN 403843, Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2014

THE EUGENE BARILO VON REISBERG SERIES

Capturing Glamour | Society portraiture during the long 19th century, 1789-1914 

Join Eugene Barilo von Reisberg as he introduces you to of some of the most famous 19th century society portraits drawn from public museums, royal palaces, and private collections from around the world.

You will discover how the portraiture of the ‘Long 19th century’ reflects the social changes of this fast-paced epoch, and how the artists of the era adapted the genre of portraiture to changing demands and divergent artistic movements, including Neoclassicism, Romanticism, and Impressionism.

Alongside the famous artists from France and England you will discover prominent portrait painters from Austria, Belgium, Hungary, Germany, Italy, Russia, Spain, and other countries.

You will gain glimpses into the fascinating lives of the gifted artists and the colourful personalities who graced their studios; learn the secret language of portraiture; and uncover the covert messages shared between the portraits and the viewers.

Karl Briullov (1799-1852), Portrait of Countess Julia Samoilova, 1842, collection of The Russian Museum, St Petersburg

STUDY SERIES | OUT OF INDIA
(A SERIES OF EIGHT LECTURES)

Presented by well-known art and cultural historians, the Out of India study series will explore worlds where art, design and architecture meet. The study series will provide an opportunity to consider responses to things Indian, and will offer insights into how the relationships between European and Indian, and occasionally Chinese craftsmen, were all interconnected.

$20 Adults | $18 Full time students (per lecture)
NEW discount for multiple lecture bookings
Book into the complete Out of India study series of eight lectures to receive a 15% discount

The Out of India study series has been initiated by Christine Reid and we thank her for her support and contribution to this programme of lectures.

Ekneligoda Walauwa, Sri Lanka, 1825 | photograph by Clive Lucas, 2003

Wrapping The Body, Draping The Room: Kashmir shawls in British India with Susan Scollay     
Wednesday 22 October 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18  SOLD OUT

Please telephone 03 9416 2515  to be placed on our wait list for this lecture.

At the turn of the 19th century fashionable European women began to wear luxurious cashmere shawls imported from Mughal India. These prestigious and exotic garments became so popular that local manufacturers in France and England began to make imitation Indian shawls in an effort to meet growing demand. By the 1820s women from all walks of life were wearing some version of the shawl in the Indian style and fashionable women in British India were no exception. They became part of a curious design phenomenon whereby many original Indian patterns were modified to suit European taste and  were subsequently worn and used in the home by British residents of India in ways quite removed from their Kashmir origins.  

SUSAN SCOLLAY is an independent art historian and curator specialising in Islamic art and culture and in historic textiles. She is a contributing editor to HALI, the prestigious, London-based journal of carpet, textile and Islamic art. Susan was guest curator of Fluid Borders: Ways of Seeing Oriental Rugs held at The Johnston Collection in 2010. Her recent curated exhibition, Love and Devotion: From Persia and Beyond was shown at the State Library of Victoria and the Bodleian Library, University of Oxford in 2012-13. She was recently elected as a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society, London.

English School, from a portrait pair (unknown lady), 19th century, The Johnston Collection (A0907-1989)

‘Dress Soft’ | from the Prince of Wales to the Preppy Look with Peter McNeil
Wednesday 15 October 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18

Why do men wear striped ties? What is the ‘Windsor knot’? Who would get their jacket and trousers made in different continents? In our own era when fashions are set on the catwalk, in clubs and on the streets, it is difficult to imagine an era when a royal male set trans-Atlantic fashions. Yet that was precisely the role of the Duke of Windsor, already one of the most famous men in the world as Prince Edward of York, later Prince of Wales, before he abdicated after a short reign as King Edward VIII in 1936. Take a walk inside his wardrobe and fashion world.

DR PETER McNEIL is Professor of Design History at the University of Technology Sydney and Foundation Professor of Fashion Studies at Stockholm University, Sweden. He is the author of numerous publications including ten works on fashion, including the best-selling Shoes, also translated into Italian (with Giorgio Riello 2006; 2011). Current book projects include the ‘long’ history of luxury, supported by the UK Leverhulme Trust and fashion writing from the 17th century to the present day. 

This lecture is generously supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection

The Duke of Windsor's wardrobe, Paris

BY POPULAR DEMAND | LECTURE REPEAT
A Brief History Of Stained Glass with Ian George

Monday 13 October 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $20 / $18

Glass has been with us since around 3000 BCE but not in windows until around 300CE. By the 12th century new technology was able to provide brilliantly coloured glass in lead channels which remains one of most memorable art forms in Western culture. The art has evolved over the centuries and has been experiencing a significant revival in recent decades. It is exciting to examine this tradition and its new forms.

DR IAN GEORGE has been an art critic since the 1960s. His postgraduate work was in aesthetics. Since then he has served on the Visual Arts Committee of the Festival of Perth, as a Trustee of the Queensland Art Gallery and Vice-President of the Queensland Festival, had two terms on the Community Arts Board of the Australia Council and is a regular lecturer at the National Gallery of Australia, the Art Gallery of South Australia and the National Gallery of Victoria.

detail of William Shakespeare window in the Dome Gallery of The State Library of Victoria, Melbourne

The Hidden Treasures Of Venice & Rome
29 September – 11 October 2015
A 13-day tour of lesser know collection, palazzo and districts of Venice and Rome

It is significant that the most Serene Republic of Venice and Ancient Rome were the destinations of the 18th century English Grand Tourists searching for the grandeur of the ancient world, the sophistication of the Renaissance and the theatre of the Baroque. It is in these two cities that the tapestry of Western civilization can be endlessly unravelled.

This tour will discover the treasures of the smaller churches, tiny canals, little known collections and the stories they tell of districts that have all but disappeared.

Canaletto (Giovanni Antonio Canal), (Italy, 1697 – 1768), The Return of the Bucintoro to the Molo on Ascension Day, 1732, The Royal Collection, England, RCIN 404417

These tours will be led by Sylvia Sagona, specialist in 19th century French art and literature, who has been leading cultural tours to Italy and France for the past twelve years.

Further information visit : www.travelsthroughtime.com

The Continental Romantics
Thursday 9 October 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18

The 19th century saw an unprecedented flowering of portrait painting in Russia, where Vladimir Borovikovsky and Karl Briullov captured the dazzling display of splendour of the Russian Imperial Family and their fabulously wealthy courtiers. The Napoleonic Wars influenced the development of portraiture in Central Europe, including the emergence of the understated Biedermeier style of Ferdinand Waldmüller, and the Empire-style inspired Romanticism of Joseph Karl Stieler, renowned for his Gallery of Beauties at the Nymphenburg Palace. The improved travel conditions saw the emergence of the glamorous cosmopolitan elite, which were elegantly captured by the equally cosmopolitan Franz Xaver Winterhalter and his contemporaries from France, Italy, and Spain.

Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-1873), Portrait of Elisabeth, Empress of Austria, 1865, Hofburg Palace, Vienna

Eating Empire 2 | Spicing and the taste for curry with Jacqui Newling
Wednesday 24 September 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18

Following last year’s successful EATING EMPIRE | Spicing and the taste for the exotic in the Regency, this talk will illustrate the evolution of curry and its status through the 18th - 19th centuries. The presentation includes a hands-on component showing the characteristic ingredients and variants and sample recipes from period cookery texts.

JACQUI NEWLING is the Sydney Living Museums (formerly Historic Houses Trust of NSW) resident gastronomer, ‘I explore the world of food with an inquiring mind and a deep curiosity – not simply about the food itself, but about why it is a food. How did that item become acceptable as a food and how did it arrive at our tables? In fact, to me, gastronomy is about people – what people do to and with food to make it a part of their lives.

This lecture is generously supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection

Captain George Franklin Atkinson (1822-1859), ‘our burra khanah’ from Curry and Rice on Forty Plates or The Ingredients of Social Life at Our Station in India, 1859

Staffordshire Or Canton, Calcutta Or Birmingham? | Household goods in British Colonial India with James Broadbent and Christine Reid
Wednesday 27 August 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18

Christine Reid and James Broadbent will discuss and examine examples of the ceramics, silver, textiles and furniture used or influenced by the British in India in the early 19th century.


JAMES BROADBENT is perhaps Australia’s most eminent cultural historian whose working life has been devoted to historic buildings and gardens and is the guest curator for the current house-museum tour AN ENGLISHMAN ABROAD | At home in British India.

CHRISTINE REID is a Melbourne-based garden writer who contributes regularly to a wide range of Australian and international publications, both mainstream and academic. She is convenor of the current study series on British India.

This lecture is generously supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection

wine cooler (from a pair) makers mark for Edward Barnard, Edward Barnard Jnr., John Barnard, William Barnard, assayed London 1835-6 Bears Indian crest with engraved motto ‘Heavens Light our Guide’ Sterling silver | The Johnston Collection (A1042-1989)

From Kedleston To Calcutta | Lord Curzon & India with Dorothy Morgan
Wednesday 20 August 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18

The story of Britain’s Viceroy to India from 1899 to 1905 encompasses elephants, brilliant jewels, the Taj Mahal and Red Fort, massed uniforms of great grandeur, Kedleston one of the most beautiful Neoclassical houses in England and a six-foot American heiress in a stunning gown from the House of Worth.

DOROTHY MORGAN, honours history graduate of The University of Melbourne, was Guest Curator of both the exhibition FLOWERING NEEDLES: embroidery from Elizabeth to Victoria, (2010) and the house-museum tour FAIR HALL TO GLAD PARLOUR: The Flower, Its Beauty & Meaning in Art & Ornament (2011). She has lectured on Bess of Hardwicke (2010) and on the life of Mary Granville, Mrs Delany (2013). All have been for The Johnston Collection.

See also Dorothy Morgan’ other lecture THREADS ACROSS THE EMPIRE above.

Lady Curzon of Kedleston, Vicereine of India, at Government House, Kolkata, circa 1898-1905

Sir Joshua & The Doctor with John Wiltshire
Tuesday 19 August 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18

‘Almost the only man whom I call a friend,’ Dr Johnson called Joshua Reynolds. The two men couldn’t be more ill-matched – Reynolds was affable, smooth, and socially and financially successful, Johnson was curmudgeonly, abrasive and poor. This talk will tell their story through the many portraits that Reynolds made of his famous friend.

JOHN WILTSHIRE is Adjunct Professor at La Trobe University. He is the author of four books about Jane Austen, and has edited Mansfield Park for the authoritative Cambridge edition. His most recent publications are The Cinematic Jane Austen (2009) and The Making of Dr Johnson (2009). Hidden Jane Austen was published in May 2014.

See also John Wiltshire’s other lecture MANSFIELD PARK 1814 above.

Sir Joshua Reynolds (England, 1723-92), Dr Samuel Johnson (1709-84), circa 1756, collection of National Portrait Gallery, London, 1597

The Impact Of The Reformation On British Art with Ian George
Thursday 14 August 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $20 / $18

As a result of the Reformation in Britain, the painting of religious and mythological themes more or less disappears for three centuries. This leads to the flowering of portraiture in Britain.


DR IAN GEORGE has been an art critic since the 1960s. His postgraduate work was in aesthetics. Since then he has served on the Visual Arts Committee of the Festival of Perth, as a Trustee of the Queensland Art Gallery and Vice-President of the Queensland Festival, had two terms on the Community Arts Board of the Australia Council and is a regular lecturer at the National Gallery of Australia, the Art Gallery of South Australia and the National Gallery of Victoria.

PLEASE NOTE | FOND FRIEND OR FEMME FATALE? with Ian George, as advertised in our What’s On brochure,  has been postponed until 2015. We apologise for any inconvenience.

Hans Holbein, the Younger (circa 1497-1543), Portrait of Henry VIII of England, circa. 1536, collection of Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum, Madrid.

The British-Indian Bungalow with Clive Lucas
Wednesday 13 August 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18

This talk will cover the bungalows built by the British in various parts of the Empire viz India Sri Lanka, West Indies, North America, South Africa, and of course Australia

CLIVE LUCAS has been Director of Clive Lucas, Stapleton and Partners Pty Ltd, a Sydney based architecture and heritage consultancy, since 1970. He is an internationally acclaimed specialist in the heritage and conservation arena, responsible for sensitive restoration of some of the most notable buildings in NSW. His publications include Australian Colonial Architecture (1978) and Colour Schemes for Old Australian Houses (1984).

This lecture is generously supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection

Ekneligoda Walauwa, Sri Lanka, 1825 | photograph by Clive Lucas, 2003

THE SYLVIA SAGONA STUDY SERIES

SYLVIA SAGONA is an internationally recognised specialist on 19th century French society. She retired from the French Department at The University of Melbourne to work on historical documentaries for French and Australian television and is currently researching a book on the invention of the restaurant in Paris in the 18th century.

Illicit Pleasures | Changing attitudes to the representation of food and feast in French art and literature
Thursday 7 August 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18

Any French citizen had the right to watch the King and Queen of France consume sumptuous dishes at the “grand couvert” at Versailles, but on the eve of the Revolution that feast had changed its significance from national display to national shame. During the 19th century French art and literature would invest images of food and dining with new social meaning in line with modern perceptions of smell and taste and the politics of the day. What you ate was more significant than where you were born.

The Revolution, Rousseau And The Restaurant | The invention of the restaurant in Ancien Regime Paris
Thursday 17 July 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18

The restaurant as we know it today was developed at the end of the Ancien Regime, ironically, for those who considered themselves too sensitive to digest normal food and could only drink a “restoring” broth.

When the Revolution of 1789 drove aristocrats into exile, their chefs survived by opening up eating houses where this delicate elite could exhibit its superiority in the theatre of public dining. By the end of the 19th century Paris was filled with every type of dining experience from bistrot to brasserie where art, literature, politics, espionage and prostitution thrived.

interior of Le Grand Véfour, Paris

Threads Across The Empire | how British and Indian taste, traditions, techniques and expertise intersected in the world of textiles with Dorothy Morgan
Wednesday 6 August 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18

Both Britain and India had a long though quite different textile tradition when they first met and things began to merge. By looking at examples such as shawls, muslin, the tree of life and tambouring we will discover some of the benefits and drawbacks of Empire and the colonial experience.

DOROTHY MORGAN, honours history graduate of The University of Melbourne, was Guest Curator of both the exhibition FLOWERING NEEDLES: embroidery from Elizabeth to Victoria, (2010) and the house-museum tour FAIR HALL TO GLAD PARLOUR: The Flower, Its Beauty & Meaning in Art & Ornament (2011). She has lectured on Bess of Hardwicke (2010) and on the life of Mary Granville, Mrs Delany (2013). All have been for The Johnston Collection.

See also Dorothy Morgan’ other lecture FROM KEDLESTON TO CALCUTTA above.

detail, lower half of a long shawl with a deep border, floral style, circa 1850, private collection

Plumassier | Master of the art of the plume with Paola di Trocchio

Tuesday 5 August 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18

Ever since Marie Antoinette added exotic plumes to her headdress in the 18th century, feathers have rarely been absent from female fashion, with featherwork continuing to be integral to luxury haute couture fashion. Discover the role of the plumassier, the master feather worker and couture artisan, from the eighteenth century to present day haute couture.

PAOLA DI TROCCHIO is Curator, Fashion and Textiles at the NGV, Melbourne. This year she is co-ordinating co-curator of the upcoming exhibition, The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk opening at the NGV in October. Previous exhibitions include Edward Steichen and Art Deco Fashion, ManStyle, Lace in Fashion, Drape: classical mode to contemporary dress, Black in Fashion: Mourning to Night and Remaking Fashion.

Jean Paul Gaultier (France, 1952 - ), Les Indes galantes [Romantic India] collection, Lascar dress | Haute couture, spring-summer 2000 © Patrice Stable /Jean Paul Gaultier

Charles Dickens' Journalism | A literary word with Margaret Mendelawitz and Nicholas Partridge
Tuesday 29 July 2014, 10.15 am to 12.00 midday $20 / $18

Charles Dickens was an accomplished reporter before he achieved success as a writer of fiction. His two-penny weekly magazine Household Words was filled with a mix of original short stories and crusading social journalism aimed at affluent middle-class families and people of influence, no less than at working-class readers interested in ‘trading up’. It was launched amidst widespread hype on 30 March 1850 and ceased publication in May 1859.

Join Dickens specialist Margaret Mendelawitz along with Nicholas Partridge, as she illustrates Dickens's career as a journalist and Nicholas Partridge reads from Household Words.

MARGARET MENDELAWITZ is a graduate in history and anthropology from the University of Western Australia. She is the researcher and presenter of the five volume anthology Charles Dickens’ Australia: Selected Essays from Household Words 1850 – 1859, Sydney University Press, 2011.

NICHOLAS PARTRIDGE is a radio and television journalist and broadcaster, having written, researched, conceptualised, developed, produced and presented since 1968 - initially for the ABC, but then the BBC and has won international awards for documentaries with David Bellamy. He was also the foundation manager of pubic FM broadcasting in Western Australia

William Powell Frith RA, (1819 – 1909), Charles Dickens in his Study, 1859, collection of Victoria & Albert Museum, London, bequest of John Forster, (F.7)

Furnishing The Colonial House | India and Australia, Contrasts & Parallels with James Broadbent
Wednesday 16 July 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18 SOLD OUT

(Please phone 03 9416 2515 to be put on our wait list for this lecture)

In 1824 it was estimated that over half the goods imported into Australia came from India. How did this, and experience of Colonial India, fashion the lives and houses of our early colonists?

JAMES BROADBENT is perhaps Australia’s most eminent cultural historian whose working life has been devoted to historic buildings and gardens and is the guest curator for the current house-museum tour AN ENGLISHMAN ABROAD.

This lecture is generously supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection

Sir Charles D’Oyly (England, 1781–1845), Summer Room in the Artist’s House at Patna September 11, 1824, England, 1824, collection of Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection, New Haven, Connecticut, B1986.29.378

Dr Johnson And Women | His Friends and His Enemies with John Byrne
Tuesday 15 July 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am $20 / $18

Samuel Johnson famously said that he wished he could "spend my life driving briskly in a post-chaise with a pretty woman;" Throughout his life he delighted in the company of women, both high and low. In this lecture you will hear about the literary ladies ("the blue-stockings"), the aristocratic women, the paupers and the prostitutes he promoted, loved, fought and cared for throughout the "the Age of Johnson" when he was the dominant literary figure in Europe. Meet Mrs Thrale, Fanny Burney, Elisabeth Carter, Mrs Williams and Poll Flint and see the books they wrote. You will also learn of Johnson`s connection with Australia and his influence on Jane Austen through his friendships with these women. 

JOHN BYRNE is a retired solicitor, founding member and currently President of The Johnson Society of Australia. He is a Governor of Dr Johnson's House, London, and a former President of The Johnson Society (Lichfield), England (2008), and of The Samuel Johnson Society of the West, USA (2009). He has been a Johnson collector for over four decades and has lectured widely in USA, UK and Australia.

Joshua Reynolds (1723–1792) Portrait of Hester Thrale and her daughter Hester, England, circa 1777, collection of the Beaverbrook Art Gallery, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada

GENERAL LECTURES & WORKSHOPS

Fashion & Art with Peter McNeil
Wednesday 18 June 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $20 / $18

Fashion is today one of the most important forms of popular expression.  But where does ‘Art’ come in?

For centuries, artists have engaged with and influenced fashion, many even designing the very stuff of its support, cloth. Learn how art forms as different as history painting, sculpture, portrait painting, print-making and the commercial art, ephemera and photography of our own era have depicted, created and promoted fashions. Gain a sense of fashion history from the Middle Ages to our time.

DR PETER MCNEIL is Professor of Design History at University of Technology Sydney and Foundation Professor of Fashion Studies at Stockholm University, Sweden.

He is the author of numerous publications including ten works on fashion, including the best-selling Shoes, also translated into Italian (with G, Riello 2006; 2011) Current book projects include the ‘long’ history of luxury, supported by the Leverhulme Trust, United Kingdom and fashion writing from the 17th century to the present day

Alexander Roslin (1718 – 1793), John Jennings Esq., his Brother and Sister-in-Law, 1769, collection of the National Museum, Stockholm

Read about Peter McNeil’s other lecture High-Heel Heaven above

A Brief History Of Stained Glass with Ian George
Thursday 5 June 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $20 / $18 SOLD OUT : phone 9416 2515 to be put on a Wait List for if there is a booking cancellation.

Glass has been with us since around 3000 BCE but not in windows until around 300 CE. By the 12th century new technology was able to provide brilliantly coloured glass in lead channels which remains one of most memorable art forms in Western culture. The art has evolved over the centuries and has been experiencing a significant revival in recent decades. It is exciting to examine this tradition and its new forms.

DR IAN GEORGE has been an art critic since the 1960. His postgraduate work was in aesthetics. Since then he has served on the Visual Arts Committee of the Festival of Perth, as a Trustee of the Queensland Art Gallery and Vice-President of the Queensland Festival, had two terms on the Community Arts Board of the Australia Council and is a regular lecturer at the National Gallery of Australia, the Art Gallery of South Australia and the National Gallery of Victoria.

French Painting From The French Revolution To Impressionism, 1780-1880 with Peter McPhee
Wednesday 28 May 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $20 / $18

The revolutionary century after 1780 was a whirlpool of political and social upheaval before the republican ship entered a secure harbour in 1880. How did painters such as David, Vernet, Courbet and Monet respond to abrupt changes of regime and official artistic preferences? How was art affected by the changing French society of the nineteenth century?

PETER MCPHEE is a Professorial Fellow at The University of Melbourne, where he was the university's first provost. He has published widely on the history of modern France, including most recently Living the French Revolution, 1789-1799.

Jacques-Louis David (1748 – 1825), The Intervention of the Sabine Women, France, 1799, collection of The Louvre, Paris

Locks Of Love | The Story of Memento Mori
(or ‘mourning’) Jewellery with John Byrne
Tuesday 15 April 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $20 / $18

In the 21st century we tend to forget that our forebears lived their lives in the constant presence of death. Infant mortality was high, hygiene and medicine were rudimentary, disease was rampant. Mourning jewellery has an ancient history but reached new and extravagant heights in the 19th century. John will show pieces from his collection, tell what these pieces meant to their wearers and explain the cultural significance of these often touching but bizarre, objects. He will also tell of the adventures behind the collection.

JOHN BYRNE is a retired solicitor and founding member of the Johnson Society of Australia. He is currently the Governor of Dr Johnson's House, London, former President of Johnson Society, Lichfield, England (2008-9), President of the Samuel Johnson Society of the West USA (2008-9). He has been a Johnson Collector for over four decades and lectured widely in USA, United Kingdom and Australia.

set hair decoration detail from verso of George Engleheart, (England, 1750/3-1829), portrait miniature (of a gentleman), circa 1800, (A0794-1989)

Reynolds And Wright Paint Children with John Wiltshire
Tuesday 8 April 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $20 / $18

Wright’s painting of the Synnot children is one of the NGV’s most popular 18th century portraits.  Wright included children in many of his famous group pictures, and in this fully illustrated talk the treatment of children in his paintings will be compared with some of the charming child portraits by his greater rival, Joshua Reynolds.

JOHN WILTSHIRE is Adjunct Professor at La Trobe University. He is the author of four books about Jane Austen, and has edited Mansfield Park for the authoritative Cambridge edition. His most recent books are The Cinematic Jane Austen (2009) and The Making of Dr Johnson (2009). The Hidden Jane Austen will be published by Cambridge University Press in May this year.

Joseph Wright of Derby (1737-97), The Synnot children, 1781, collection of National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, E1-1980
presented through The Art Foundation of Victoria by Mrs Michael Hawker (née Patricia Synnot), Founder Benefactor, 1980

Read about John Wiltshire’s other lecture My Life With Jane above

Living With Antique Furniture with Michael Garwood and Ulrike Garwood
Thursday 3 April 2014, $20 / $18

This workshop will present practical information about what to do and what not to do with antique furniture and wooden objects. Hands-on demonstrations (e.g. showing you how to clean and wax furniture) and discussions (with some examples presented illustrating common problems), will help inform you about how to care for and maintain the beauty and function of your antique furniture.

MICHAEL GARWOOD and ULRIKE GARWOOD are conservators of objects, especially wooden objects. Both are graduates of the British Antique Dealers Association program at West Dean College in the United Kingdom and subsequent internships in the Furniture Conservation Section of the Victoria & Albert Museum in London. They have worked in Melbourne for a number of years as conservators in private practice.

detail from maker unknown, Pembroke table, England, circa 1775, (A0038-1989)

SPECIAL EVENT: Virgin Australia Melbourne Fashion Festival Cultural Program 2014

We are delighted to be part of the Virgin Australia Melbourne Fashion Festival’s Cultural Program 2014,  which pushes fashion beyond the runway, into the realms of art, design, film and contemporary culture.

The Cultural Program runs for the whole month of March 2014 and invites fashion-loving audiences to revel in the range of experiences on offer. View the full program on www.vamff.com.au/events/cultural-program

brocaded Silk Tobine women’s shoes, England or American (with American family history), circa 1750 photograph by Titi Halle / Cora Ginsburg

High-Heel Heaven with Peter McNeil
Tuesday 25 March 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $20 / $18

Shoes convey a wide range of meanings associated with fashion, style, personality, sexuality, class and gender. New studies have given us awareness of the personal, social and sexual connotations attributed to footwear and created by footwear. Different shapes and colours for men’s and women’s shoes today revolve primarily around the construction of gender difference. Many of these gendered distinctions developed in the so-called ‘long 18th century’. Why do men and women’s shoes look so very different today? Learn about shoes, mobility and history, from Renaissance platform chopines to Sex and the City ‘limousine’ shoes.

DR PETER MCNEIL is Professor of Design History at University of Technology Sydney and Foundation Professor of Fashion Studies at Stockholm University, Sweden.

He is the author of numerous publications including ten works on fashion, including the best-selling Shoes, also translated into Italian (with G, Riello 2006; 2011). Current book projects include the ‘long’ history of luxury, supported by the Leverhulme Trust, United Kingdom and fashion writing from the 17th century to the present day

This lecture is generously supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection

Read about Peter McNeil’s other lecture Fashion & Art below

THE EUGENE BARILO VON REISBERG SERIES

Before Victoria:Women Of The Royal Family During The Late Georgian Era

The amount of material available on Queen Victoria is seemingly inexhaustible. Hardly a year passes by without a new biography or a novel being published, or a new dramatisation or documentary being filmed, investigating and reinterpreting various aspects of her life.

The ongoing fascination with Queen Victoria and her era overshadowed the lives of the royal women of the preceding generation: the wife, daughters, and daughters-in-law of Queen Victoria’s grandfather, George III.

Join art historian Eugene Barilo von Reisberg in uncovering insights into the fascinating, tumultuous, and, at times, sad destinies of the royal women who came before Victoria.

EUGENE BARILO VON REISBERG is a writer, researcher, and art consultant. He is an internationally acknowledged authority on Franz Xaver Winterhalter, the nineteenth-century elite portrait specialist, and he is currently completing a doctoral thesis on the artist at the University of Melbourne

read about Eugene Barillo von Reisberg’s other lecture above

The Great Pregnancy Race | The Duchesses of Clarence, Kent, and Cambridge with Eugene Barilo von Reisberg
Tuesday 27 May 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $20 / $18

The unexpected death of Princess Charlotte of Wales plunged the British monarchy into a succession crisis. Three of the remaining bachelor sons of King George III rushed over to Europe to secure an eligible princess and procure the desired heir for the British throne. The last lecture focuses on the lives of the three royal brides who arrived in England in the summer of 1818: Princess Adelaide, the future Duchess of Clarence and consort of William IV; Princess Victoria, the future Duchess of Kent and mother of Queen Victoria; and Princess Augusta, the future Duchess of Cambridge and grandmother of Queen Mary.

Sir William Beechey (1753-1839), Victoria, Duchess of Kent, with her daughter, Princess Victoria, 1821, The Royal Collection, England, RCIN 407169


 

The Unruly Queen And The People’s Princess | Queen Caroline and Princess Charlotte of Wales with Eugene Barilo von Reisberg
Tuesday 13 May 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $20 / $18

The second lecture focuses on women in the life of George, Prince of Wales (future George IV): his wife, Princess Caroline of Brunswick, who was forced to flee the country to escape her husband’s persecution and abuse, and whom he famously banned from her own coronation; and their only daughter, the beloved and popular Princess Charlotte of Wales, who openly rebelled against her father’s tyranny.

Sir Thomas Lawrence (1769-1860), Caroline, Princess of Wales, with her daughter, Princess Charlotte of Wales, 1801, The Royal Collection, England, RCIN 407292

Forgotten Princesses | Six Daughters of George III and Queen Charlotte with Eugene Barilo von Reisberg
Tuesday 29 April 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $20 / $18

Princesses were traditionally expected to marry into foreign royal families to strengthen strategic relations between their native and adopted nations, facilitate diplomatic and cultural exchange, and establish new dynasties. However, the prospects of connubial bliss for the six daughters of George III and Queen Charlotte were overshadowed by the illness of their father, domineering spirit of their mother, and the political instability in Europe. The first lecture uncovers the complicated web of marital disappointments, lonely spinsterhoods, and illicit love affairs of the six forgotten princesses.

Thomas Gainsborough (1727-88), Princesses Charlotte, Augusta and Elisabeth, 1784, The Royal Collection, England, RCIN 400206

 

THE JANE AUSTEN SERIES 2014 | MANSFIELD PARK 1814

 To mark the 200 years since the first publication of Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park by Thomas Egerton in May 1814, The Johnston Collection is celebrating with a year-long programme of activities coinciding with the bicentenary and the honouring of her work.

frontispiece from Mansfield Park published by Thomas Edgerton, London, 1814

Do You Dance Mr. Darcy? with Lise Rodgers
Thursday 29 May 2014, 2.00 pm to 3.30 pm, $20 / $18

When Jane Austen wrote that “to be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love”, she was writing of a world where dancing was the most important pastime for making the acquaintance of the opposite sex. A world of balls and assemblies, country dances and reels; a world where fun and flirtation were possible within a strict code of conduct. But what was the etiquette? What were the steps and how did Jane and her heroines fare on the dance floor?

LISE RODGERS is an accomplished Melbourne actress whose career has spanned stage, screen and radio. An interest in the world and characters of Jane Austen is the inspiration behind her series of Jane Austen performances.

Jane Austen | The Consolations of Chawton Cottage with Damon Young
Tuesday 20 May 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $20 / $18

What was Jane Austen doing coveting an apricot? Learn about Jane Austen’s love of gardens and philosophy of life, as philosopher Damon Young gives a reading from his acclaimed book Philosophy in the Garden, where he explores one of literature's most intimate relationships: authors and their gardens.

Reviews of Philosophy in the Garden:
“... fluent and stylish and never marred by clichés or clichéd thinking ...” - The Australian
"Reading this book is like strolling in a luxuriant garden with an erudite friend …” – The Age

DAMON YOUNG is a philosopher and writer. He is the author of several popular nonfiction books, including Distraction, Philosophy in the Garden and How to Think About Exercise. Damon has written for The Age, The Australian, the ABC and BBC, and is a regular radio guest. He has also published poetry, short fiction and a children’s picture book.

Illustration by Daniel Keating, courtesy of Damon Young

My Life With Jane with John Wiltshire
Wednesday 2 April 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $20 / $18

John Wiltshire is one of the world’s leading Jane Austen scholars.  He has read, taught and written about her novels since his schooldays.  What is it about her work that makes such devotion possible? This is the story of his life-time love affair with Jane.

JOHN WILTSHIRE is Adjunct Professor at La Trobe University. He is the author of four books about Jane Austen, and has edited Mansfield Park for the authoritative Cambridge edition. His most recent books are The Cinematic Jane Austen (2009) and The Making of Dr Johnson (2009). The Hidden Jane Austen will be published by Cambridge University Press in May this year.

The ‘Wedding Ring Portrait’ of Jane Austen (England 1775-1817), circa 1873, after a drawing by Cassandra Austen (England 1773-1845) engraved for Evert Augustus Duyckinck (1816-1878) Portrait Gallery of Eminent Men and Women of Europe and America, published by Henry J. Johnson, New York, 1873

 

THE SYLVIA SAGONA STUDY SERIES

SYLVIA SAGONA is an internationally recognised specialist on 19th century French society. She retired from the French Department at The University of Melbourne to work on historical documentaries for French and Australian television and is currently researching a book on the invention of the restaurant in Paris in the 18th century.

Bringing It All Back Home | The Role Of Canaletto’s Veduta and Batoni’s Portraits in Creating the Image of English Aristocracy with Sylvia Sagona
Thursday 15 May 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $20 / $18

The 18th century Grand Tour was about aristocratic male bonding across cultures. Proof of the experience would be exhibited on the walls of manors across England where fellow cognoscenti could identify with the experience. Canaletto developed a new type of urban landscape, the veduta, to cater for this self advertising, while Pompeo Batoni‘s portraits portrayed the transformation from youth to gentleman.

Bernardo Bellotto (Canaletto) (circa 1721/2 –1780), Capriccio with the Colosseum, Italy, 1743-44, collection of Galleria Nazionale, Parma, Italy

 

The Myths Of Venice with Sylvia Sagona
Thursday 8 May 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $20 / $18

This alluring city of angels, rising out of the waters and hovering on the border between East and West wove miraculous legends about herself, and played them out in extravagant masked pageants which drew tourist crowds from the Middle Ages onwards. Her painters and poets alike celebrated the myth of Venezia, which successfully blended the contradictory stories of Venus rising from the sea with the Annunciation of the Virgin Mary.

Canaletto (Giovanni Antonio Canal), (Italy,1697 – 1768), The Return of the Bucintoro to the Molo on Ascension Day, 1732, The Royal CollectionEngland, RCIN 404417

Antiquity And Iniquity | Rome of the English Grand Tourists with Sylvia Sagona
Thursday 1 May 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $20 / $18

The Grand Tour became a rite of passage for young English aristocrats who were required to spend at least two years abroad before taking up their rightful place in society with an increased appreciation of the solidity and uprightness of English cultural institutions. Rome, seat of the Classics, was a great Empire fallen into decadence and now under the rule of dreaded "papists”. The lure of such sensuality had to be experienced but resisted.

Pompeo Batoni, (Italy, 1708 –1787), portrait of General William Gordon (1736 – 1816), 1765–66, collection of Fyvie Castle, (The National Trust, Scotland), Fyvie, Scotland

STUDY SERIES : THE ART OF DANCE 

Presented by well-known art, cultural and dance historians, The Art of Dance study series will explore the social and cultural worlds where art, dance and design meet. The lectures will consider how Australian and international artists connected with their contemporaries and provide an opportunity to celebrate dance and culture in the making.


NEW Study Series | The Art of Dance
A Series of Seven Lectures

$20 Adults | $18 Full time students (per lecture)
NEW discount for multiple lecture bookings - book into the complete Art of Dance series of seven lectures to receive a 15% discount

From Bedroom To Kitchen And Beyond | Women of the Ballet with Michelle Potter
Wednesday 25 June 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $20 / $18

Across the decades women have been the heroines of many of the best known ballets in the international repertoire. Dance historian Michelle Potter will look at some famous female heroines and those who have brought those characters to the stage.

DR MICHELLE POTTER is an independent writer and curator with a doctorate in Art History and Dance History from the Australian National University. She was inaugural Curator of Dance at the National Library of Australia, 2002-2006, and Curator of the Jerome Robbins Dance Division, New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, 2006-2008.

This lecture is generously supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection

Madeleine Eastoe in La Sylphide, The Australian Ballet, Melbourne, 2005 |choreography: Erik Bruhn after August Bournonville | costume design: Anne Fraser |
photograph by Justin Smith | courtesy of The Australian Ballet

Rudi’s Antiques & Collectables | Rudolph Nureyev Collector and Prince of Dance with Anne Butler
Wednesday 11 June 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $20 / $18

Travelling trunk, kilims and male nudes : Rudolph Nureyev was not only an icon of dance but also a great collector of antiques and art. One of the richest artists of his time, his collection and personal belongings were auctioned through Christie’s in New York and London in 1995 amassing over $10 million dollars. This talk explores Nureyev’s collection, including costumes and ballets, which were part of his fame.

ANNE BUTLER holds a Post-graduate degree in the teaching of classical ballet from the Faculty of the VCA, The University of Melbourne and Fellowship status, Cecchetti Ballet Australia and International. As an independent researcher, she has delivered and published papers throughout Australia, United Kingdom and the USA.

Mathilde Kschessinska | “My Life Was Beautiful” with Eugene Barillo von Reisberg
Wednesday 21 May 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $20 / $18

Few stars of the Russian Imperial Ballet shone as brightly off the stage as Mathilde Kschessinska. The Prima Ballerina counted the Emperor and Grand Dukes among her admirers; amassed a fabulous fortune and sumptuous collection of jewels; and lived in one of the most elegant mansions in St Petersburg … only to lose it all in the Russian Revolution. However, in exile she was able to marry the man she loved and establish a dance studio which trained ballet stars of the next generation.

EUGENE BARILO VON REISBERG is a writer, researcher, and art consultant. He is an internationally acknowledged authority on Franz Xaver Winterhalter, the nineteenth-century elite portrait specialist, and he is currently completing a doctoral thesis on the artist at the University of Melbourne

photographer unknown, Mathilde Kschessinska, carte-de-visite, 1897, private collection

read about Eugene Barillo von Reisberg’s other lectures below

Ballet Fantasias | Loudon Sainthill’s Decorative Art with Andrew Montana
Wednesday 7 May 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $20 / $18

Inspired by decorative surrealism and late-Renaissance court masques, the fantasy décor and costumes of acclaimed Australian-born artist Loudon Sainthill (1918-1969) transported Australian and international audiences during the middle of the twentieth century. Highlighting the significant influence of ballet on his art, this lecture introduces the impact of Colonel de Basil’s Ballets Russes tours in Melbourne on Sainthill, and presents Sainthill’s ballet fantasias in the 1940s and beyond.

ANDREW MONTANA is a senior lecturer at the Australian National University, specialising in the art and design history of the 19th and 20th centuries. He has developed and curated exhibitions on Australian and international decorative arts. His most recent publication is Fantasy Modern: Loudon Sainthill’s Theatre of Art and Life (NewSouth, 2013).

This lecture is generously supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection

Loudon Sainthill (1918-1969) Decoration, 1941, bequest of Mrs Mignon McKelvey in memory of her mother Mrs Muriel Beatrice Ervin 1967 | collection of the Queensland Art Gallery
photograph by Natasha Harth

Aussie Swans And Satin Slippers | The Evolution of The Australian Ballet from 1962 to today with Jordan Beth Vincent
Wednesday 23 April 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $20 / $18

This lecture tells the story of The Australian Ballet, Australia’s flagship national ballet company. Integrating archival materials and films, it will explore the evolution of the company from its premiere performance in 1962, its early profile and repertoire, and the passionate individuals who advocated for its success.

JORDAN BETH VINCENT is a Melbourne-based dance historian and critic, academic and lifelong fan of all things dance.  She has a PhD in dance history from the University of Melbourne. Since 2008, she has reviewed dance, circus and physical theatre for the Age, and she is the Australian columnist for Dance International Magazine. She lectures in dance history at the Victorian College of the Arts and is an Associate Research Fellow at Deakin University.

Amber Scott and Adam Bull in Swan Lake, The Australian Ballet, Melbourne, 2007 |choreography: Graeme Murphy | costume design: Kristian Fredrikson |
photograph by Liz Ham | courtesy of The Australian Ballet

A Perfect Pas De Deux? | Ballet & Fashion with Roger Leong
Wednesday 9 April 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $20 / $18

 At certain points throughout the last 100 years, fashion and dance have seemed inextricably linked. Coco Chanel designed costumes for the Ballets Russes and Yves Saint Laurent designed costumes for the Roland Petit company. These are only two of many memorable partnerships. This talk reflects on the synchronicity of ballet and fashion at certain points over the past century and up to the present day.

ROGER LEONG is Curator International Fashion & Textiles at the NGV, Melbourne. His exhibitions include Ballet and Fashion (2012), ManStyle (2011), Black in Fashion (2007), Dressed to Kill: 100 Years of Fashion (1994) and From Russia with Love: Costumes of the Russian Ballet (1999).
Justine Summers in Divergence,The Australian Ballet, Melbourne, 1994. Choreography: Stanton Welch, Costume Design: Vanessa Leyonhjelm
Photograph by Jim McFarlane | courtesy of The Australian Ballet

Artistic Direction & Aesthetic Preoccupations at The Australian Ballet with Lee Christofis
Wednesday 19 March 2014, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $20 / $18

Many great ballets from St Petersburg, London, Paris and New York, and fine Australian works, have shaped The Australian Ballet. This presentation focuses on the distinctive aesthetic preoccupations that its seven artistic directors, from Peggy van Praagh in 1962 to David McAllister today, have brought to bear on the company’s repertoire.

Lee Christofis, former Curator of Dance at the National Library of Australia, is regarded as one of Australia's leading dance critics and arts commentators in print and broadcast media. He writes and lectures on Australian and international dance history and its intersections with music, design and dramaturgy, notably on ballet.

Portrait of Peggy van Praagh, circa 1970
photograph | Australian Information Service, National Library of Australia, PIC/3132/14

 

Study Day 2013

The Fine Art Of Collecting: A matter of taste

Saturday 12 October 2013, 10.00 am – 4.30 pm
$125 (including lunch box), students $100 (including lunch box)

The Fine Art of Collecting – A Matter Of Taste Study Day will cover notions of collecting, connoisseurship, the gentleman collector as well as public and private collections from the second half of the 17th century to the present day. The Study Day traverses the ever-changing passions and the rules of taste, novelty, political patronage and economic environments, as well as for the appreciation of artistic talent.

Speakers for the Study Day will include Corbett Lyon, Christopher Marshall, Matthew Martin, Ben Thomas, Bruce Trethowan and Gerard Vaughan.

Curiosities And Desires | Collecting Objects, Collecting Ourselves with Christopher Marshall

This presentation will consider the often complex processes informing the creation of significant collections of art and antiquities of the past and present. What differentiates a private collection from that of a public institution? And what motivates the collecting activities of such distinguished private collectors through the ages as Catherine the Great of the Hermitage, St Petersburg, or David Walsh of the Museum of Modern Art, Hobart?

 
Dr Christopher Marshall is Senior Lecturer in Art History and Museum Studies at the University of Melbourne. His research interests include the art of the Renaissance and Baroque periods, the history of the art market and museum studies, as is reflected in his recent publications which include Sculpture and the Museum, Ashgate (2011); ‘Naples’ in Painting for profit: the economic lives of 17th century Italian painters, Yale University Press (2010).

 
Pompeo Batoni (1708 – 1787), Sir Sampson Gideon and an unidentified companion, 1767, collection of National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Everard Studley Miller Bequest, 1963
 

Catholic Collecting And Patronage In 18th Century England | Houses, Gardens, Collections with Matthew Martin
 
Barred from active participation in the public life of the nation, many great English Catholic families in the 18th century turned to patronage and collecting as a means of accumulating social prestige. This lecture will examine the collecting and patronage of two lesser known Catholic families, the Lords Clifford of Chudleigh and the Throckmortons of Coughton Court. The art and architectural patronage of these families and the collections they accumulated are revealed as reflecting a cultural identity that was at once English and loyal to ancestral religion.

DR MATTHEW MARTIN is Assistant Curator in the Department of International Decorative Arts and Antiquities in the National Gallery of Victoria. He is also a Research Associate in the Melbourne College of Divinity. Martin has degrees in Art History, Archaeology and Semitic Linguistics. He has published on a wide range of topics related to the decorative arts and has lectured in the same field in the United States and the United Kingdom, as well as here in Australia.
 
Nicolas de Largillière (1656 - 1746), portrait of Frances Woollascott, an Augustinian Nun, 1729, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide

William Beckford | The Consummate Collector with Bruce Trethowan

Using the privilege of great wealth, the British collector William Beckford, 1760- 1844, amassed one of the finest private collections of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. He had an uncanny eye for quality and an endless passion for the fine arts, the decorative arts and architecture. The scope and diversity of his collecting interests extended from the decorative arts of China, England, France, Greece and Turkey to Old Master and contemporary paintings. His most ambitious project was his fantastic residence Fonthill Abbey set in the wooded landscape of his Wiltshire estate.

Bruce Trethowan is Director, trethowan - architecture interior design.
 
John Hoppner (1758 – 1810), William Beckford, circa 1800, City of Salford Art Gallery, England

The Gentle Art Of Deaccessioning | The NGV Sales Under Daryl Lindsay’s Directorship with Benjamin Thomas

Undoubtedly one of the last great taboos in collection practice is the controversial issue of deaccessioning. This lecture will explore a series of deaccessioning sales of art works from the National Gallery of Victoria’s collections during the 1940s and early 1950s, primarily under the directorship of Daryl Lindsay, discussing the circumstances surrounding the disposal and tracing the fate of several of the works.

BEN THOMAS is the Rusden Curator at Trinity College, The University of Melbourne, and a Research Fellow with the Australian Institute of Art History. He was awarded his doctorate for his biographical study of noted Australian art administrator and artist, Sir Daryl Lindsay, and holds a Masters degree in Museum and Gallery Curatorship. He was the 2009-10 recipient of the Dr Joseph Brown AO Fellowship in art at the State Library of Victoria.

Athol Shmith (1914–1992), Sir Daryl Lindsay, 1943, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 1978.154

The NGV & The English Country House | Taste & Acquisitions with Gerard Vaughan

When the Felton Bequest was at the height of its buying power in the 1920s, 30s and 40s, the London dealers favoured by the NGV regularly sourced works from major country house collections. In 1939, through the will of Melbourne-born Howard Spensley, the finest items from Westoning Manor, his house in Bedfordshire, were bequeathed to the NGV. The paper will explore the origin, and original context, of a group of artworks in the NGV collection which, through their provenance, offer important insights into the history of taste and collecting in England. DR

GERARD VAU GHAN is Professorial Fellow School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne. He was until recently the Director of the National Gallery of Victoria and is an art historian who wrote his doctoral thesis at Oxford on 18th century taste for the Antique. His research interests are particularly concerned with the history of taste and art collecting in the 18th century and 19th centuries, ranging from neo-classicism to post-impressionism.

Edward Haytley (flourished 1740 – 1764), The Brockman family at Beachborough (Temple pond with temple in the distance), circa 1744 – 1746, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Everard Studley Miller Bequest, 1963 
 

Collecting Contemporary Art & The Contemporary House Museum with Corbett Lyon

In this illustrated talk Corbett Lyon will present the challenges and opportunities of collecting contemporary art and displaying it in domestic settings. It will include an overview of modern and contemporary examples including the Lyon Housemuseum where contemporary art, architecture and living spaces are integrated and juxtaposed.

CORBETT LYON is a Visiting Professor in Design and Professorial Fellow at The University of Melbourne, Director of Lyons Architects, and Director of the Lyon Collection and Housemuseum.

interior of Lyon Housemuseum, Melbourne

GENERAL LECTURES

Dickens & Women with Elizabeth Neales and Margaret & John Leonard
Friday 27 September 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25 

The lecture will deal briefly with the women in Dickens’ own life, before examining a selection of the women in the novels. It has been said that Dickens could not create plausible female characters, but, with the help of dramatisations by Margaret and John Leonard, the lecture will suggest that many of his female characters are wonderful and believable creations.

ELISABETH NEALES is a graduate of Oxford University and has taught English and History in secondary schools in England and Australia. She is currently Secretary of the Dickens Fellowship Melbourne Branch. JOHN AND MARGARET LEONARD have diverse experience with the performing arts and now delight in sharing their enthusiasm for literary classics through dramatised readings.

 
Kyd (Joseph Clayton Clarke) (1857 – 1937) illus., Sairey Gamp, 1889 from Charles Dickens’s Martin Chuzzlewit

Johnson’s Friends (and some enemies) with John Bryne
Tuesday 22 October 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

“A man, Sir, should keep his friendship in constant repair.” So said Dr Johnson who numbered some of the greatest minds of the 18th century (both male and female) as his friends. Meet these poets, painters, historians, harlots, journalists and jesters and come to know them through books and prints from John Byrne’s library and the libraries of Johnson’s friends.

JOHN BYRNE is a retired solicitor and founding member of the Johnson Society of Australia. He is currently a Governor of Dr Johnson’s House, London, former President of The Johnson Society, Lichfield, England (2008-9), and former President of The Samuel Johnson Society of The West USA (2008-9). He has been a Johnson collector for over four decades and lectured widely in USA , UK and Australia.

Owen Bailey (flourished 1851) after James Doyle (1822–1892), detail from A literary party at Sir Joshua Reynolds’s, published 1851, National Portrait Gallery, London
 

The Monster In The Garden | The Grotesque, The Gigantic And The Monstrous In Renaissance Landscape Design with Luke Morgan
Tuesday 15 October 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

This lecture will examine the neglected theme of monstrosity in Renaissance gardens. Representations of monsters, giants and the grotesque are common in 16th and 17th century landscape design but they have rarely been studied. The lecture will suggest that our understanding of the Renaissance garden as a straightforward locus amoenus (‘pleasant place’) or reflection of paradise is incomplete without an acknowledgement of the presence of the monster.

DR LUKE MORGAN is a Senior Lecturer in Art History and Theory at Monash University. His book Nature as Model: Salomon de Caus and Early Seventeenth-Century Landscape Design was published in 2007 by the University of Pennsylvania Press. His current research focuses on monsters in early modern landscape design.

‘The Mouth of Hell’ at The Sacred Grove of Bomarzo, Italy

Turner, Blake & Constable | The Great Outsiders with Ian George
Thursday 10 October 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

During the life of Jane Austen, the greatest painters in British art were at work. They are usually lumped together as ‘romantics’. All three, Turner, Blake and Constable, for various reasons (which Jane Austen would well have understood) were outsiders in their society and time.  

DR IAN GEORGE has been an art critic since 1960. His postgraduate work was in aesthetics. Since then he has served on the Visual Arts Committee of the Festival of Perth, as a Trustee of the Queensland Art Gallery and Vice- President of the Queensland Festival, had two terms on the Community Arts Board of the Australia Council and is a regular lecturer at the National Gallery of Australia, the Art Gallery of SA and the National Gallery of Victoria.

J M W Turner, RA (1775 – 1851) Rain, Steam and Speed – The Great Western Railway, 1844, National Gallery, London

The Pierre Loti House-Museum In Rochfort-Sur-Mer | A Collection Of The Self Between Exoticism And Kitsch with Bertrand Bourgeois
Wednesday 9 October 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

This lecture will show how the French writer and world traveller Pierre Loti transformed his own house of Rochfort-sur-Mer into a very bizarre house-museum where exoticism, medievalism and kitsch interweave to create both a fascinating and disturbing mirror of Loti’s self. We also emphasise how Loti’s house-museum participates in the writer’s passion for disguise and wish to assimilate others cultures.

BERTRAND BOURGEOIS is a lecturer at the University of Melbourne and is an expert in house-museums, having written a book entitled Poétique de la maison-musée (1847-1898) L’Harmattan Paris (2009) focusing on real and fictional 19th century French house-museums.

‘The Turkish Living-room’ of the Pierre Loti house-museum

Ephemerists | Collectors of paper ‘rubbish’ from the 17th century to the present day with Gillian Russell
Tuesday 8 October 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

Often described as the ‘transient minor documents of everyday life’, printed ephemeron has been the object of fascination for men and women across the centuries. The digitisation of the world’s knowledge means that ephemeral literature is now more visible than it ever was before. In this illustrated talk Gillian Russell outlines the history of some notable figures in the history of the collecting of printed ephemera in Britain and the USA, such as Anthony Wood, Sarah Sophia Banks – the sister of Sir Joseph Banks – John Johnson, and Bella Landauer.

GILLIAN RUSSELL is an academic at the Australian National University, Canberra, who researches and teaches British 18th century and Romantic culture with a focus on theatre, sociability and gender.

This lecture is kindly supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection

Dickens & Christmas (not a Christmas Carol) with Elizabeth Neales and Margaret & John Leonard
Wednesday 23 October 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

The lecture will explain how Christmas celebrations owe much to the influence of Charles Dickens. Apart from the well-known ‘Christmas Carol’, there are many other writings which show the author’s belief that Christmas should be a time of family unity and general benevolence. Margaret and John Leonard will give dramatised readings from some of these writings.

ELISABETH NEALES is a graduate of Oxford University and has taught English and History in secondary schools in England and Australia. She is currently Secretary of the Dickens Fellowship Melbourne Branch. JOHN AND MARGARET LEONARD have diverse experience with the performing arts and now delight in sharing their enthusiasm for literary classics through dramatised readings.

John Leech (1817 – 1864) (illustrator), Mr. Fezziwig’s Ball, from DICKENS, Charles, A Christmas Carol, Chapman and Hall, London, 1843 29

Café Society At Home | Grand Luxe And The Inter-War Years with Peter McNeil
Tuesday 24 September 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

Glamour means making yourself available to be looked at, and the staging of the domestic interior was central to that role. We examine the great patrons of luxury of the inter-war years and the early 1950s: Elsie de Wolfe, Gabrielle ‘Coco’ Chanel, Elsa Schiaparelli, Diana Vreeland, Pauline de Rothschild, Mona Bismark and the Duchess of Windsor. Understand better the relationship of interior decoration to dress and other fashions including clothing and jewellery.

DR PETER MCNEIL is Professor of Design History at University of Technology Sydney and Foundation Professor of Fashion Studies at Stockholm University, Sweden. He is the author of numerous publications including ten works on fashion, including the best-selling Shoes, also translated into Italian (with G, Riello 2006; 2011) Current book projects include the ‘long’ history of luxury, supported by the UK Leverhulme Trust and fashion writing from the 17th century to the present day.

This lecture is kindly supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection.

The Duchess of Windsor leaving an Italian hotel, c1952

Inspired Design | Decorative Arts from Europe and North America with Robert Reason
Thursday 12 September 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

Robert Reason will talk about inspired design through treasures from the European and North American decorative arts collection of the Art Gallery of South Australia. Reason will examine the Gallery’s particularly rich British collection of rare, beautiful and sometimes quirky objects from a 500 year span, and covers ceramics, textiles, metalwork, furniture, jewellery and glass. The lecture will discuss an Elizabethan Standing salt, a Thomas Tompion Clock, Chelsea porcelain toys and the unique William Morris collection.

ROBER T REASON is Curator, European and Australian Decorative Arts at the Art Gallery of South Australia and Affiliate Lecturer in the School of History and Politics at the University of Adelaide. He has been a Board member and Chair of Craft Australia and attended the Attingham Summer School in 2008.

This lecture is kindly supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection.

Standing salt, 1583 84 (possibly a bull’s head maker’s mark), London, England Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, gift of Gladys Penfold Hyland in memory of her husband Frank, 1964 26
 

Jean-François Millet Paints The French Countryside with Peter McPhee
Thursday 29 August 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

Jean-François Millet settled in Barbizon after the French Revolution of 1848 and until his death in 1875 devoted himself to painting and drawing rural life. The peasant household’s routines of spinning, caring for livestock, harvesting, and so on are captured in images which resonate with respect for rural toil. Some of his paintings - such as The Angelus - are among the most reproduced paintings of all time. But who was Millet? And did he simply detail the rural world he saw around him, as he claimed, or did he rather construct an imaginary world?

PETER MCPHEE is a Professorial Fellow at the University of Melbourne. He has written widely on the history of modern France, most recently Robespierre: a Revolutionary Life (Yale University Press, 2012).

Jean-François Millet (1814-1875), The Angelus (L’Angelus) (1857 1859), collection of the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, France

Interpreting Place | The Influence Of The Tasmanian Environment On 19th And Early 20th Century Women’s Art with Glenda King
Tuesday 27 August 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

To 19th century British and European eyes, the newly occupied island of Tasmania was a place of exotic animals, unknown plants and dynamic landscapes. This foreign, often threatening environment became a key source of inspiration for women artists and craftspeople in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Tasmania’s unique environment was recorded and interpreted in works that foreshadowed the continuing influence of the natural environment on the creative culture of Tasmania today.

GLENDA KING has worked in Australia and internationally over the past 35 years in art organisation and museum management, exhibition curation including international touring exhibitions and collection management. Until March 2013 Glenda was Manager of Visual Arts & Design at the Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery, Launceston.

This lecture is kindly supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection.

Amelia Burrows (1860-1927) four-fold screen, Launceston, 1889, Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery, purchased with funds through the QVMAG Arts Foundation, 2006
   

Caring For Your Collection | Works On Paper And Photographs with Jude Fraser
Tuesday 20 August 2013, 10.15 am to 12.00 noon, $30/$25

The correct handling, storage and display of objects is very important for their long-term care and preservation. With the proper care and storage, your art and antiques can last into the future. Join paper and photographic materials conservator, Jude Fraser, to learn about the general care and preservation of paper and photographic objects in your collection. This overview will provide attendees with practical and effective ways to maintain works on paper and photographs. You are invited to bring along items from your own collection for assessment. 

JUDE FRASER is a paper and photographic materials conservator and Manager of the Commercial Conservation Services of the Centre for Cultural Materials Conservation at the University of Melbourne. Ms Fraser also lectures into CCMC Academic programs.

detail of a watercolour with mould damage and foxing spots

Portraying Pets | Lapdogs And Hounds In 18th Century Art with Jennifer Milam
Thursday 15 August 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

Enlightenment writers and philosophers proposed the existence of an animal soul, refuting the Cartesian beast-machine. A shift in the portrayal of dogs during the 18th century signals the role of art in reconfiguring the human perception of the animal as capable of feeling and emotion. This lecture considers the image of the dog in 18th century portraiture and genre scenes as visual explorations of the sensationist animal soul.

JENNIFER MILAM is Professor of Art History at the University of Sydney. Her books include the Historical Dictionary of Rococo Art (2011), Fragonard’s Playful Paintings: Visual Games in Rococo Art (2006) and Women, Art and The Politics of Identity in Eighteenth-Century Europe (2003).

Jean-Honoré Fragonard (1732–1806), Girl Making a Dog Dance on Her Bed, late 1760s, Alte Pinakothek, Munich, Germany

James Wyatt | Architect And Designer Of British Neoclassicism with Amanda Dunsmore
Wednesday 14 August 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

James Wyatt (1746–1813) is widely recognized as the most celebrated and prolific English architect of the 18th century. This lecture will look at James Wyatt’s career, in the context of English Neoclassicism and the emerging Industrial Revolution, followed by an examination of a suite of Wyatt furniture from Henham Hall, Suffolk, currently on loan to the National Gallery of Victoria.

AMANDA DUNSMORE is Curator, International Decorative Arts & Antiquities at the National Gallery of Victoria. She has a background in Egyptology but now works largely in the field of decorative arts. Her research interests include 17th and 18th century English pottery, 18th century Neoclassicism and early 20th century design and the rise of modernism.

William Hodges (1744 – 1797), Interior of the Pantheon, Oxford Street, London, 1770s, Temple Newsam House, Leeds Museums and Galleries, England

Shadows And Form: The Art Of Rosslynd Piggott with Rebecca Coates
Wednesday 31 July 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

Rosslynd Piggott creates exquisite objects, paintings and moving image installations. Exploring the light and shadows of life, she often alludes to the impermanent and elements more frequently hidden. Her art reflects the influence of natural forms and Japanese aesthetics: blossoms, trees, the essence of scent and pools of inky blackness appear as enduring motifs. The lecture will provide an introduction to the work of Rosslynd Piggott.

REBECCA COATES is an independent curator and writer. In 2008 she curated Rosslynd Piggott extract: in 3 parts at the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art. She lectures in contemporary art and art curation in the School of Culture and Communication, University of Melbourne, and completed her doctorate in 2013.

Rosslynd Piggott | source material from Fairhall garden

An Introduction To Heraldry with Ian George
Tuesday 9 July 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

Heraldry is often seen as an antiquated medieval field of interest without relevance to contemporary society. On the contrary, it marks much historical activity for families and organisations and is the background to modern graphic art and logo design.

DR IAN GEORGE has been an art critic since 1960. His postgraduate work was in aesthetics. Since then he has served on the Visual Arts Committee of the Festival of Perth, as a Trustee of the Queensland Art Gallery and Vice- President of the Queensland Festival, had two terms on the Community Arts Board of the Australia Council and is a regular lecturer at the National Gallery of Australia, the Art Gallery of SA and the National Gallery of Victoria.
 
The Johnston clan arms Nunquam Non Paratus (Never Unprepared)

THE JOHN WILTSHIRE SERIES

John Wiltshire is Adjunct Professor at La Trobe University. He is the author of four books about Jane Austen, and has edited Mansfield Park for the authoritative Cambridge edition. His most recent books are The Cinematic Jane Austen (2009) and The Making of Dr Johnson (2009). He contributed the chapter on ‘Women Writers’ to Samuel Johnson in Context, Cambridge University Press (2012).

Joseph Wright (1737-97) | The Master of Fire and Light with John Wiltshire
Wednesday 11 September 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

Joseph Wright of Derby may be the greatest 18th century English painter. By great good fortune, the NGV has four of his works. This talk will illustrate his range – portraits, landscapes, narrative paintings - and discuss his special contribution: pictures about the wonders of both science and nature – of fire and light.

Joseph Wright of Derby (1737-97), The Synnot children, 1781, NGV Melbourne, presented through The Art Foundation of Victoria by Mrs Michael Hawker (née Patricia Synnot), Founder Benefactor, 1980

Strong Women And Dr Johnson with John Wiltshire
Wednesday 25 September 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

Dr Johnson, probably the most famous author of the 18th century, was, unusually for a man of his time, a vigorous champion and friend of women writers and intellectuals. This talk illustrates his quite different friendships with two very interesting female novelists, Charlotte Lucas and Fanny Burney.

Edward Burney (1760-1848), portrait of Fanny Burney, 1782-4, engraving on paper

JANE AUSTEN | PRIDE & PREJUDICE 2013

To help celebrate 200 years since the first publication of Jane Austen’s Pride & Prejudice by Thomas Egerton in 1813, The Johnston Collection is contributing with a yearlong programme of activities coinciding with the bicentenary.

frontispiece from Sense and Sensibility, published by Thomas Edgerton, London, 1813

BY POPULAR DEMAND As Delightful A Creature As Ever Appeared In Print | Jane Austen Writes Elizabeth Bennet with Lise Rodgers
Thursday 5 September 2013, 2.00 pm to 3.30 pm, $30/$25

A one act theatrical entertainment based on the letters of Jane Austen and the text of Pride and Prejudice. Beautifully costumed and elegantly staged – what better way to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the publication of Pride and Prejudice than to get to know Miss Elizabeth Bennet!

LISE RODGERS is an accomplished Melbourne actress whose career has spanned stage, screen and radio. An interest in the world and characters of Jane Austen is the inspiration behind her ‘Jane Austen by Lise Rodgers’ repertoire of performances.

George Engleheart (1750 – 1829), Portrait of a Young Lady, 1807, The Thomson Collection © Art Gallery of Ontario

THE SUSAN SCOLLAY SERIES

SUSAN SCOLLAY is an independent art historian and curator specialising in Islamic art and culture and in historic textiles. She is a contributing editor to HALI, the prestigious, London-based journal of carpet, textile and Islamic art. She was guest curator of Fluid Borders: Ways of Seeing Oriental Rugs held at The Johnston Collection in 2010. Her recent curated exhibition, Love and Devotion: From Persia and Beyond was shown at the State Library of Victoria and the Bodleian Library, University of Oxford, in 2012-13. In 2013 she was elected in London as a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society.

A Life Of Letters’ | Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, 18th Century Traveller And Diarist with Susan Scollay
Tuesday 23 July 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1689-1762) was a traveller, prolific letter writer and lively diarist. She was one of the first European women to record her impressions of Islamic gardens and the luxuries of palace life when she accompanied her diplomat husband to the Ottoman Turkish court in Istanbul during the so-called ‘Tulip Era’ of Ahmet III. She also introduced to British medicine the method for inoculation against smallpox she observed amongst the Ottomans.

Charles Jervas (circa 1675 – 1739), Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, after 1716, National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin

Attar Of Roses | Sacred Oil, Fragrant Balm And Medicinal Wonder-Cure with Susan Scollay
Tuesday 30 July 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

Traces of fragrant oils made by priests have been dated to the 5th millennium BCE in ancient Egypt, but it was the ancient Persians in circa 500 BCE who most likely first used precious rose oil for pleasure as well as sacred purposes. Later, the Ottoman Turks used a combination of traditional music and rosewater aromatherapy for the promotion of well-being and in medicinal applications - especially in the treatment of mental illness.

Üsküdarlı Ali Efendi (c. 1698–c.1764) A damask rose from A Süheyl Ünver, Müzehhip ve Çiçek Ressamı Üskudarlı Ali, Istanbul, 1954
 

Politics And Poetry | Floral Designs In The Decorative Arts And Textiles Of The East And West with Susan Scollay
Tuesday 6 August 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

Using examples of works from The Johnston Collection, this lecture will explore traditional Eastern garden culture as a political tool, but also as an inspiration for the evolution of the decorative arts both in the East and West.

English School, from a portrait pair (unknown lady), 19th century, The Johnston Collection (A0907-1989)

THE SYLVIA SAGONA LECTURE

From The Scent Of Roses To The Odour Of Blood | The Story Of Marie Antoinette’s Loyal Perfumer with Sylvia Sagona
Tuesday 3 September 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

Jean-Louis Fargeon owned the most elegant and prosperous boutique in Paris where he concocted the sumptuous perfumes and unlikely pomades that attracted the attention of the fashion conscious Queen. For fourteen years he would create lavish scents to perfectly reflect her moods and personality, and was still supplying her with soothing creams when she was imprisoned in the Temple. As a supporter of the Republic yet purveyor to the queen, Fargeon’s life was constantly in danger.

SYLVIA SAGONA is an internationally recognised specialist on 19th century French society. She retired from the French Department at the University of Melbourne to work on historical documentaries for French and Australian television and is currently researching a book on the invention of the restaurant in Paris.

Martin van Meytens (1695–1770), Portrait of Archduchess Maria Antonia of Austria (Maria Antoinette) at the age of 12 years, circa 1767-1768, Schonbrunn Palace, Vienna

SECRETS & SCENTS LECTURE SERIES

Of Plants & Perfumes with Michael McCoy
Wednesday 24 July 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

While smell is perhaps the most evocative of all our senses, it has always been seriously trumped by sight in the design of gardens. Join us for a nose-led international tour of gardens and plants, looking at the leaves and flowers that have the power to shape our olfactory landscape.

MICHAEL MCCOY is a garden designer, author, broadcaster, blogger, speaker, garden tour guide and obsessive home gardener. He has been a regular contributor to The Age, Your Garden and Gardening Australia and has written for many other magazines including the British Gardens Illustrated. His first book Michael McCoy’s Garden was published in 2000 to critical acclaim, and his second The Gardenist, was published late last year.

English lavender in the formal parterre at Villandry, France

Eating Empire | Spicing and the taste for the exotic in the Regency with Jacqui Newling 
Wednesday 7 August 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

English hegemony in trade and colonisation saw a great expansion of empire, and tastes were changing in consequence. Using texts and recipes from the period, this talk will focus on the spices used in the late 18th and early 19th century Britain.

  
JACQUI NEWLING is the Sydney Living Museums (formerly Historic Houses Trust of NSW) resident gastronomer, ‘I explore the world of food with an inquiring mind and a deep curiosity – not simply about the food itself, but about why it is a food. How did that item become acceptable as a food and how did it arrive at our tables? In fact, to me, gastronomy is about people – what people do to and with food to make it a part of their lives.’

artist unknown, Patna style or Calcutta style, India ‘A khansama’ artist unknown, Patna style or Calcutta style, India ‘A khansama’ (detail from ‘Eight Servants’, from a series of eight company paintings), after 1830, The Johnston Collection (A0955.4-1989

Scenting The Past with Valerie Krips
Wednesday 21 August 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25
  
The sense of smell is one that can perhaps, more than any other, take us back to the past. The scent of wood burning in the grate, and of wax candles just snuffed out for example, can transport us, reminding us of our own pasts, or of pasts we imagine. In the last few decades much use has been made of scent in historical houses and reconstructions to enable visitors to enter into the period represented. This talk considers the importance of scent in its current role as a means of recreating, or creating, versions of history.

VALERIE KRIPS retired from the English Department, University of Pittsburgh, in 2006. She now lives in Melbourne, where she is an Honorary Fellow in the School of Culture and Communication at the University of Melbourne. Her research interests lie in cultural studies, and in particular heritage and memory.
 
interior detail from Dennis Severs, 18 Folgate Street: The Tale of a House in Spitalfields, Chatto & Windus (2002)

Quirinal Caffeaus And Caffé Greco | Contrasts In The 18th Century Coffeehouse In Rome With David Marshall
Wednesday 18 September 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

Coffee houses were centres of sociability, like a club, for drinking a non-alcoholic beverage, reading the papers and engaging in (possibly seditious) political discussion. Eighteenth-century popes liked to be up with the latest fashions, and Benedict XIV built himself a Caffeaus in the gardens of his Quirinal palace. Its magnificent (but little known) decoration, involving Pompeo Batoni and Giovanni Paolo Panini, can be compared to the very different decoration of the Caffé Greco - a haunt of artists and intellectuals - in the streets below.

DAVI D R MARSHALL is Principal Fellow, Art History, School of Culture and Communication, the University of Melbourne. He is a fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities and Honorary Research Fellow, British School at Rome. He is founder and editor of Melbourne Art Journal and a Director of Melbourne Art Network.

Giovanni Paolo Panini (1691 – 1765), Benedict XIV receiving Charles III of Naples at the Caffeaus on the Quirinal in 1744, 1745, Museo di Capodimonte, Naples

Queen Of Spices | Edward Poynter’s Visit of the Queen of Sheba to King Solomon in the Art Gallery of NSW with Alison Inglis
Wednesday 2 October 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

The biblical figure, the Queen of Sheba, has long been associated with the spice trade. The Bible tells us: “And when the queen of Sheba heard of the fame of Solomon, she came to ... Jerusalem, with a very great company, and camels that bare spices, and gold in abundance ...”. This lecture will consider the portrayal of this legendary queen in the monumental painting titled The Visit of the Queen of Sheba to King Solomon, executed by the Victorian artist, Sir Edward Poynter in 1890, and today one of the star attractions in the Art Gallery of New South Wales. Regarded as a masterpiece of British 19th century Orientalism, the picture is a fascinating amalgam of archaeological and imaginative details.

ALISON INGLIS teaches, researches and publishes on 19th century British art. Her doctorial thesis examined the work of the Victorian academic painter, Sir Edward Poynter. She is an Associate Professor in the Art History programme of the University of Melbourne. She has coordinated the MA in Art Curatorship since 1995.

Sir Edward Poynter, The Visit of the Queen of Sheba to King Solomon, 1890, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney

“And I will make thee beds of roses
And a thousand fragrant posies.”
Christopher Marlowe

The Scented Garden with Sophie Adamson
Wednesday 16 October 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30/$25

Sophie Adamson will talk on older roses focussing on their wonderful fragrances and forms. She will illustrate how the very essence of roses was sometimes neglected in breeding programs, but has gradually returned in the best of roses available today.

Sophie Adamson, Rosarian, is the former proprietor of The Perfumed Garden, a display garden and nursery at The Briars in Mt Martha. She has extensive experience and expertise in rose cultivation, garden design, old roses, Australian roses and rose gardens. For many years she held the registered collection of David Austin roses for the Garden Plant Conservation (GPCAA Botanic Gardens, Melbourne)

Roses arranged and photographed by Sophie Adamson

General Lectures

Caring For Your Collection: a general introduction with Holly Jones-Amin
 
Tuesday 18 June 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

The correct storing and display of objects is very important for their long-term care and preservation. With the proper care and storage, your art and antiques can last for many more years. Join conservator Holly Jones-Amin to learn about the general care and preservation of objects in your collection. This overview will provide practical and effective ways to maintain your collection and you are invited to bring along your own items for assessment.

HOLLY JONES-AMIN is Senior Objects Conservator at the Centre for Cultural Materials Conservation, The University of Melbourne; she lectures in the Masters of Cultural Material Conservation programme and manages the objects consultancy laboratory.

Stevenson, Alcock and Williams, plates (set of seven), 1820-26, (A0678-1989)

Theatre Of The City: Urban planning in Rome in the early 18th century with John Weretka

Thursday 30 May 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

This lecture will examine themes in the urban planning of Rome in the first half of the 18th century through the prism of the topographical engravings of Piranesi and Vasi. Particular attention will be given to the development of intimate teatri in the urban landscape, particularly as reflected in the post-Counterreformation church façade.

JOHN WERETKA holds qualifications in musicology, medieval history, art history and theology and is a candidate for the PhD in The University of Melbourne’s Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning. He has published on musical subjects in the paintings of Watteau and Pier Francesco Mola. He has also lectured on the history of music in the Baroque and Renaissance period and on art and architectural history onsite in Rome.

Giovanni Battista Piranesi (1720–1778), ‘Ichnographiam viciniæ reliquarium Teatri Pompejani‘ (detail) from Il Campo Marzio dell’antica Roma (Rome, 1762) Wilton-Ely 578

Jacques-Louis David: from French Revolution to Napoleon with Peter McPhee

Wednesday 8 May 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

Jacques-Louis David painted two of the most famous revolutionary portraits in history, of Jean-Paul Marat (1793) and Napoleon Bonaparte (1803). This lecture uses these and his other artistic works to examine the extraordinary life of a man at the heart of revolutionary times.

PETER MCPHEE is a Professorial Fellow at The University of Melbourne. He has written widely on the history of modern France, most recently Robespierre: a Revolutionary Life, Yale University Press (2012).

Jacques-Louis David (1748–1825), Self-portrait at age 44 (detail), circa 1792, Musée du Louvre, Paris

Thomas Hornor And London’s ‘Second Life’: from map, to book, to panoramic scene with Peter Otto

Wednesday 24 April 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

This lecture offers an introduction to the multi-faceted oeuvre of Thomas Hornor (1785-1844), who worked as land surveyor, cartographer, landscape gardener, showman, and landscape and panorama artist. It focuses on his experiments with virtual space, which culminated in his remarkable panorama of London and the equally remarkable Colosseum in which it was exhibited. The Colosseum’s immersive virtual realities, and the way in which they were used by visitors, offer a remarkable anticipation of our own, now dominant, ‘second lives’.

PETER OTTO is ARC Research Professor in literary studies at The University of Melbourne. His recent publications include Gothic Fiction: A Guide (2003), Entertaining the Supernatural (2007) and Multiplying Worlds: Romanticism, Modernity and the Emergence of Virtual Reality (OUP 2011). He is completing a book on Gothic Fictions and Imagined Worlds.

Bird’s Eye View from the Staircase and the upper part of the Pavilion in the Colosseum, Regent’s Park (detail), pub. June 1819 by R. Ackermann, London

The Care And Conservation Of Historic House Collections with Chris Daintith

Friday 22 March 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

Paintings, works of art on paper, furniture, metalwork and textiles on open display in historic houses will inevitably deteriorate over time. This illustrated lecture will discuss agents of deterioration and describe the way in which carefully formulated policies of preventive conservation and management, such as those developed by the English National Trust, may enable those responsible for historic properties and collections to assure their long-term conservation.

CHRIS DAINTITH has worked as an archaeological conservator in Italy, as a ceramics conservator at the British Museum in London, and as a Regional Conservator for the English National Trust, caring for the contents of some of England’s greatest historic houses. She is one of the authors of the Trust’s authoritative Manual of Housekeeping.

The Ballroom at Knole, Sevenoaks, Kent, England

The Eugene Barilo Von Reisberg Series

EUGENE BARILO VON REISBERG is a Melbourne-based arts writer, curator, and blogger. His research on Franz Xaver Winterhalter, a 19th century elite portrait specialist, is widely recognised, and he has contributed numerous articles and presented lectures on the artist in Australia and internationally. He is currently pursuing a doctoral thesis on the artist at The University of Melbourne.

Behind The Veil At Russian Court: Dreams and destinies of the Romanov women

The lives of the Romanov women – wives and daughters of the Russian Emperors and Grand Dukes – hold a continuous fascination due to the near-irreconcilable contrast between the spectacular splendour of the heydays of the Russian Empire and the sheer rapidity of the downfall and near-annihilation of the Romanov Dynasty following the Russian Revolution of 1917. With the fall of the Soviet Union in 1992, a wealth of new information has come to light that provides new insights into the lives of the Russian Imperial Family. It allows for a more balanced and objective examination of their lives, which acknowledges their love of luxury and splendour as well as their pivotal importance in the social, political, and cultural life of Russia and Europe.

Join EUGENE BARILO VON REISBERG on the adventurous cavalcade that spans three centuries of the House of Romanov and traces, over three consecutive lectures, the triumphs, trials, and trepidations of the Romanov women from the glorious reign of Catherine the Great in the middle of the 18th century to the difficult reconciliation between the surviving members of the Romanov Dynasty with the post-Communist Russia today.

Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-1873), Portrait of Olga Nikolaevna, Grand Duchess of Russia, Queen of Württemberg (1822-92) (detail), 1857, Württembergisches Landesmuseum, Stuttgart

Lecture 3 | The Ashes And The Phoenix: 1896-2013 with Eugene Barilo Von Reisberg

Tuesday 21 May 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

It is difficult to imagine a greater contrast than that between the glitter and gold that accompanied the 1913 Tercentenary Celebrations of the Romanov Dynasty during the reign of Nicholas II, and the dismal abyss into which the family were plunged following the Russian Revolution of 1917.

This lecture examines the prescient disquiet and palatial intrigues among the matriarchs of the Imperial family; the patriotism and selfless assistance of the Romanov women in medical and charitable causes during the First World War; assassinations, imprisonments, and, at times, near-miraculous escapes from the Revolutionary Russia; and their gradual adaptation to the lives of penniless exiles abroad. This lecture concludes with the uneasy reconciliation between the surviving members of the Romanov dynasty, headed by the Grand Duchess Maria Vladimirovna, with the post-Communist Russia at the dawn of the 21st century.

Vladimir Makovsky (1846-1920), Portrait of Maria Feodorovna, Empress of Russia (1847-1928) (detail), 1912, The Russian Museum, St Petersburg

Lecture 2 | Under The Reign Of Three Tsars: 1825-1896 with Eugene Barilo Von Reisberg

Tuesday 14 May 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

Rarely did the Romanov women shine as brightly or were as visible and active in Russian and European social, political, and cultural circles as during the successive reigns of Nikolai I, Alexander II, and Alexander III in the middle of the 19th century. The lecture follows, among others, the lives of the highly respected Grand Duchess Elena Pavlovna, who was the catalyst behind the emancipation of the serfs enacted by her nephew, Alexander II; the worldly Maria Nikolaevna, the intrepid art collector who became the first female president of the Imperial Academy; the glamorous Alexandra Iossifovna, who proudly distributed bookmarks in the shape of her small feet; and the haughty, authoritarian Maria Alexandrovna, who rarely missed a chance to ruffle the feathers of her formidable mother-in-law, Queen Victoria.

Christina Robertson (1796-1854), Portrait of Grand Duchesses Olga Nikolaevna and Alexandra Nikolaevna of Russia (detail), 1840, The State Hermitage and Winter Palace Museum, St Petersburg

Lecture 1 | In The Shadow Of Catherine The Great: 1750-1825 with Eugene Barilo Von Reisberg

Tuesday 7 May 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

The first lecture focuses on the Russian Imperial Family during the successive reigns of Catherine II, Pavel I, and Alexander I, and follows the lives of the Romanov women in the shadow of the formidable Empress; their menace under the rule of the increasingly mad Pavel; and greater visibility and autonomy during the reign of Alexander. Among the notable personages discussed in the lecture are the Grand Duchess and Empress Maria Feodorovna, who bore her husband ten children and yet was implicated in his assassination in 1801; Anna Feodorovna, who escaped her sadistic husband Konstantin into a self-imposed exile in Switzerland; Anna Pavlovna, whose hand in marriage was sought by Napoleon I; and Maria Pavlovna, who married a German prince and transformed his provincial Weimar into the cultural capital of Europe.

Alexander Roslin (1718-1793), Portrait of Maria Feodorovna, Empress of Russia 1759-1828) (detail), 1777, The State Hermitage and Winter Palace Museum, St Petersburg

The John Wiltshire Series

JOHN WILTSHIRE is Adjunct Professor at La Trobe University. He is the author of four books about Jane Austen, and has edited Mansfield Park for the authoritative Cambridge edition. His most recent publications are The Cinematic Jane Austen (2009) and The Making of Dr Johnson (2009). Hidden Jane Austen is forthcoming.

Pride And Prejudice In Film with John Wiltshire

Friday 19 April 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

2013 marks the bicentenary of the publication of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. Jane Austen’s second novel, it was described by the author as her ‘own darling child’, and it remains perhaps the best-loved English novel of all time. It has been adapted for television many times, and twice for film. What do these versions tell us about the novel? Do they do it justice?

Keira Knightley - Greg Williams photoshoot for Pride & Prejudice (detail), 2005

Pride And Prejudice: Romance and Marriage with John Wiltshire

Friday 12 April 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

Pride and Prejudice is loved by readers all over the world. Why is this? What makes this novel both a rapturous read and a deeply significant work of art? This lecture will attempt to answer these questions. It will focus on romance and the various marriages in Pride and Prejudice.

‘Bridal couple’, plate #15, Le Journal des Dames et Des Modes (Costumes Parisien) (detail), 1826

The Jane Austen Series: Pride & Prejudice 2013

To help celebrate 200 years since the first publication of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice by Thomas Egerton in 1813, The Johnston Collection is contributing with a year-long programme of activities coinciding with the bicentenary.

Jane's Heroines: young ladies of spirit! with Lise Rodgers

Thursday 23 May 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

Jane Austen was as fond of her heroines as we are. When creating Emma Woodhouse, Elizabeth Bennet and Anne Elliot; she wrote three young ladies of spirit – and had a different opinion of each. Using excerpts from her letters and passages from Emma, Pride & Prejudice and Persuasion, this is a chance to spend some time with the young ladies in question.

LISE RODGERS is an accomplished Melbourne actress whose career has spanned stage, screen and radio. An interest in the world and characters of Jane Austen is the inspiration behind her Jane Austen by Lise Rodgers repertoire of performances.

John Smart (circa 1740–1811), Portrait of Miss Harriet and Elizabeth Birney (detail), 1806

Books, Bras And Bridget Jones: reading adaptat ions of Pride
and Prejudice with Olivia Murphy

Thursday 16 May 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

In April 1996, following the huge success of a recent TV adaptation of Pride and Prejudice, the lingerie manufacturer Berlei caused controversy by claiming its products were responsible for the ‘eye-catching cleavage’ of the show’s actresses. This talk investigates what happened next, and explores what else is at stake in adaptations and interpretations of Jane Austen’s novels.

OLIVIA MURPHY is currently a Teaching Fellow in English at the Women’s College, The University of Sydney. From January 2013 she will also be a Visiting Fellow of the University’s English Department. She recently finished her doctorate at Oxford, and has published several scholarly articles on Jane Austen. Her book Jane Austen the Reader will be published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2012.

This lecture is kindly supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection.

Renee Zellweger in Bridget Jones, The Edge of Reason (2004)

Thorough Bass And Human Nature: A musical tour through Pride and Prejudice with Gillian Dooley

Saturday 13 April 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

This programme of scintillating readings from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice is studded with music from her personal music collection, including piano pieces and songs by Joseph Haydn, Thomas Arne, Georgiana Cavendish, Christoph Willibald Gluck. Dance music, operatic arias, folk songs and charming ballads illustrate each reading, from the excitement of the Meryton Ball through the times of doubt and despondency to the happy conclusion at Pemberley.

Soprano GILLIAN DOOLEY is Honorary Senior Research Fellow in English at Flinders University, Adelaide. Over the past six years she has devised and presented programmes of Jane Austen’s music in Adelaide, Canberra, Sydney and the United Kingdom

Pianist FIONA MCCAULEY has been playing in Jane Austen’s music programmes since 2009.

This lecture is kindly supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection.

(artist unknown), Regency young lady playing the pianoforte, early 19th century

As Delightful A Creature As Ever Appeared In Print: Jane Austen writes Elizabeth Bennet with Lise Rodgers

Thursday 21 March 2013, 2.00 pm to 3.30 pm, $30, students $25

A one-act theatrical entertainment based on the letters of Jane Austen and the text of Pride & Prejudice. Beautifully costumed and elegantly staged – what better way to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the publication of Pride & Prejudice than to get to know Miss Elizabeth Bennet!

LISE RODGERS is an accomplished Melbourne actress whose career has spanned stage, screen and radio. An interest in the world and characters of Jane Austen is the inspiration behind her Jane Austen by Lise Rodgers repertoire of performances.

George Engleheart (1750 – 1829), Portrait of a Young Lady, 1807,
The Thomson Collection © Art Gallery of Ontario

The Sylvia Sagona Series

SYLVIA SAGONA is an internationally recognised specialist on 19th century French society. She retired from the French Department at The University of Melbourne to work on historical documentaries for French and Australian television and is currently researching a book on the invention of the restaurant in Paris.

The Empress Eugenie: Power and Petticoats

Tuesday 30 April 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

European nobility sniggered when the future Napoleon III made a love marriage with the stunning Spanish redhead Eugenie de Montijo, who unlike royal princesses, was not prepared to play just a passive role. Napoleon always consulted her on matters of State and rightly or wrongly many of his foreign policy blunders are laid at her feet. But this intriguing so called conservative would champion women’s causes in unusual ways while at the same time becoming the prototype of the image of the chic Parisienne which would spread worldwide through the fashion designs of her couturier, Worth.

Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-1873), The Empress Eugenie (detail), 1894

George Sand: The Romantic Rebel

Tuesday 23 April 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

The Baroness Aurore Dudevant saw marriage as a prison sentence and abandoned a life of ease to escape to Paris to make her name as George Sand in the tough male world of journalism. In an amazing career which spanned most of the 19th century she lived out at least three lives; firstly as femme fatale and muse of Chopin, de Musset and Liszt: as ardent socialist preaching the rights of women: and above all as writer of thirty scandalous romantic novels and a tell all biography in which the main players in French society were exposed.

Josef Danhauser (1805-1845), Liszt fantasising at the piano, 1840, Staatliche Museum, Berlin

Out Of The Shadow Of The Guillotine

Wednesday 10 April 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

The Spanish Teresa Cabarrus, the Creoles, Fortunée Hamelin and Rose de Beauharnais as well as the languid Juliette de Récamier played important political roles in the turbulent years following the French Revolution.

Thérèse, known as Our Lady of Thermidor for her part in bringing down Robespierre, rivalled Rose and Fortunée in outrageous behaviour, fashion invention and influence of the most powerful men of the time. Juliette’s salon showcased the first Romantic literature until she was exiled by Napoleon. These women constantly re-invented themselves to survive but symbolised the last flicker of female liberty before the 19th century boudoir door slammed shut.

François Gérard (1770–1837), Portrait de Juliette Récamier (detail), 1805, musée Carnavalet, Paris

Madame de Pompadour And The Politics of Porcelain

Tuesday 26 March 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

The ‘divine Marquise’ who rose from obscurity to become Louis XV’s mistress, sole confidant and power behind the throne, cleverly maintained her power over the king in her role as arbiter of taste. As his roving eye strayed over younger women, she left the routine side of being a royal mistress to the more energetic and reinvented herself as unofficial minister of the arts. The grateful Louis awarded her vast sums to embellish Paris with magnificent mansions, and gardens. She masterminded the porcelain Manufacture de Sèvres and oversaw its designs which subtly celebrated her intelligence and beauty throughout Europe.

François Boucher (1703–1770), Madame de Pompadour (Jeanne-Antoinette Poisson) (detail), circa 1756, Alte Pinakothe, Munich, Germany

Women Making History Lecture Series

Seventeenth-Century Sirens: Portraits of Two Italian Musicians with Mark Shepheard

Wednesday 19 June 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

Life was not easy for the female musician in 17th century Italy. Although musical ability was seen as a desirable accomplishment for the cultivated noblewoman, public performances by women brought associations of immorality; the female singer was often seen as a woman of low social standing, little better than a courtesan.

Two fascinating portraits from the 1640s (those of Barbara Strozzi and Leonora Baroni) present very different images of the female musician, each attempting in its own way to negotiate the equivocal status of woman as professional performer.

MARK SHEPHEARD is completing his PhD in Art History at The University of Melbourne. He is on the editorial board of the journal emaj and is a director of the Melbourne Art Network. He is also a broadcaster for 3MBS FM, for which he produces ‘The Early Music Experience’ and ‘Recent Releases’.

Bernardo Strozzi (circa 1581-1644), Portrait of Barbara Strozzi, circa 1640, Gemäldegalerie, Dresden

‘A Lady Of Singular Ingenuity And Politeness’: The life of Mary Granville, Mrs Delany with Dorothy Morgan

Wednesday 12 June 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

This illustrated talk will examine the life of Mrs Delany from reluctant young bride to a second widowhood. She was admired and respected by all, from Joseph Banks and Horace Walpole to Fanny Burney and George III and Queen Charlotte. Artist, designer, gardener, embroiderer, correspondent, sometime political activist and ‘amiable’ companion, Mrs Delany trod her own path within the confines of 18th century society with grace, intelligence and a firm step.

DOROTHY MORGAN, honours history graduate of The University of Melbourne, was Guest Curator of the exhibition FLOWERING NEEDLES: embroidery from Elizabeth to Victoria, (2010) and the house tour FAIR HALL TO GLAD PARLOUR: The Flower, Its Beauty & Meaning in Art & Ornament (2011) and lectured on Bess of Hardwick (2010), all for The Johnston Collection

Mrs Delaney (1700-1788), Passion Flower (from the Flora Delanica) (detail), paper mosaic, circa 1771-1781

Touch Me Not: Mary Magdalene and the power of gesture in medieval and renaissance art with Felicity Harley-McGowan

Tuesday 4 June 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

During the Italian Renaissance, the ‘ideal’ image was described as that which ‘captures the eye of whatever learned or unlearned person is looking at and moves his soul’.

This lecture will explore the ways in which artists across the 6th - 16th century achieved this in representations of Mary Magdalene as the first witness of Christ’s resurrection; in particular, it will examine the use of body language as a way of provoking different emotions in the viewer.

FELICITY HARLEY-MCGOWAN is an historian of Late Antique and Medieval art, with particular interests in the art of early medieval Rome. She completed her PhD at The University of Adelaide, and has held research fellowships at the Warburg Institute, University of London, The British School at Rome and The Yale Divinity School.

Titian (circa 1488/1490 –1576), Noli me Tangere, about 1514, The National Gallery, London

Queen Casimira with Katrina Grant

Wednesday 29 May 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

Queen Maria Casimira Sobieski, the widowed queen of Poland, moved to Rome in 1699. She was a great patron of opera and a member of the prestigious Arcadian Academy. In 1708 she constructed her own private theatre in the Palazzo Zuccari. However, biographers have typically painted her as opportunistic and scheming and she remains a shadowy figure in early 18th century Rome despite her patronage of such leading artists as Domenico Scarlatti and Filippo Juvarra.

KATRINA GRANT completed her PhD at The University of Melbourne in 2011 on the topic The Theatrical Baroque Garden: Garden and Theatre in Italy 1600-1750. She is a founding editor of the online art history journal emaj and the editor of the Melbourne Art Network.

Jerzy Eleuter Szymonowicz Siemiginowski (circa 1660 – circa 1711), Allegory of Spring with portrait of Queen Maria Casimira (detail), 1680s, Wilanow Palace Museum, Poland

 

The Great Queen Of The South: Edward Poynter’s The visit of the Queen of Sheba to King Solomon in the Art Gallery of NSW with Alison Inglis

Saturday 11 May 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

The monumental painting of The Visit of the Queen of Sheba to King Solomon, executed by the Victorian artist, Sir Edward Poynter in 1890, is today regarded as a masterpiece of British 19th century Orientalism.

Certainly the picture is a fascinating amalgam of archaeological and imaginative details – even including its magnificent gilt frame. This paper will examine the painting in terms of its history and reception in the 19th and 20th centuries, and also place it within the complex iconographical tradition of the Queen of Sheba.

ALISON INGLIS teaches, researches and publishes on 19th century British art. Her doctorial thesis examined the work of the Victorian academic painter, Sir Edward Poynter. She is an Associate Professor in the Art History program of The University of Melbourne. She has co-ordinated the MA in Art Curatorship since 1995.

Sir Edward Poynter, The Visit of the Queen of Sheba to King Solomon (detail), 1890, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney

Queens, Favourites And Princesses At The French Court with Jennifer Milam

Wednesday 1 May 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

This lecture explores portraits of high ranking women at the court of Versailles during the reign of Louis XV and Louis XVI. In particular, it looks at the agency of women, who were not always responsible for payments to the artist, but nevertheless exerted influence over the creation and reception of their images both at court and in the salons.

Specifically, the lecture looks at portraits of Queen Marie-Leczinska, the Marquise de Pompadour, Madame Adélaïde, and Queen Marie-Antoinette to consider the dialogue between artist, sitter and beholder in 18th century conceptions of womanhood.

JENNIFER MILAM is an Associate Professor in the Department of Art History at the University of Sydney. Her books include the Historical Dictionary of Rococo Art (2011), Fragonard’s Playful Paintings, Visual Games in Rococo Art (2006) and Women, Art and the Politics of Identity in 18th Century Europe (2003).

This lecture is kindly supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection.

Elisabeth Vigée-LeBrun (1755-1842), Marie-Antoinette with her Children (1787), Musée National du Châteaux (Versailles)

Sirens On The Sideboard: 19th Century Decorative Art and the Changing Role of Women with Angela Hesson

Wednesday 17 April 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

The 19th century was a period of great social and cultural change, which witnessed significant increases in women’s rights, and marked transformations in associations between femininity, art and ornament.

Once a site of confinement, as the century progressed, the domestic interior emerged as a place of possibility for the expression of feminine creativity, discernment, and increasingly, subversion. This lecture will examine the complex and shifting roles of 19th century women as designers, collectors, and subjects of decoration.


ANGELA HESSON is Assistant Curator at The Johnston Collection, a former lecturer in Literary Studies at The University of Melbourne and a freelance arts writer. Her doctoral thesis examined the theme of femininity within late 19th century Decadence and Aestheticism.

Relief-moulded tile (with sphinx), Trent Tile, New Jersey, circa 1890

Women Of Silver: British and Irish women silversmiths of 18th and 19th centuries with Anne Harbers

Wednesday 3 April 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

Louisa Courtauld (1729 – 1807) of the Courtauld family was one of many women silversmiths whose beautiful silver pieces can be seen in the Courtauld Institute of Art in London, as well as in The National Museum of Women in the Arts in New York, which holds a silver collection of 141 women silver artisans.

This talk will focus on the skilled and intricate work of many of these women silversmiths. Such silver pieces can be seen in paintings of the time, both in family portraits grouped around afternoon tea or genre scenes of ladies at their toilette. Portraits of children often included silver rattles such as a George III child’s rattle, attributed to the silversmith Mary Ann Croswell, London made in 1808. We will enjoy viewing many of these 18th and 19th century silver items, whilst discussing their social significance of the time and the women who made them.

ANNE HARBERS is a collector of English and Dutch silver. She holds a Master research degree in Chemistry and an MBA and for 25 years has worked in the field of biotechnology. She is co-author of Jane Austen – Antipodean Views (2001). She is currently completing a postgraduate degree in Art History at the University of Sydney.

Johann Zoffany (1733-1810) (attrib), Portrait of Louisa Courtauld (detail)

‘In No Way Does She Resemble A Woman’: Queen Christina of Sweden and her reception in 17th century Rome with Lisa Beaven

Wednesday 27 March 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25


This lecture explores the extraordinary personality of Queen Christina of Sweden (1626-1689), who abdicated, converted to Catholicism and moved to Rome in 1654. In particular it looks at the effect she had on the social life and the people of Rome, who were in equal parts scandalised, attracted and repelled by this fascinating and controversial figure.

Drawing on contemporary descriptions of her, and on the artwork she collected, this lecture seeks to establish how she used culture and science to project an image that countered the negative publicity and rumours that surrounded her.

LISA BEAVEN is a Lecturer in Art History, La Trobe University. Beaven teaches the first year course Art from Renaissance to Impressionism, as well as courses on European art and travel and Baroque Art.

Sébastian Bourdon (1616–1671), Queen Christina of Sweden (detail),
circa 1644, Nationalmuseum, Stockholm

Women, Fashion & High Hair: from the 18th century to Amy Winehouse with Gillian Russell

Wednesday 20 March 2013, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30, students $25

One of the most enduring images of 18th century culture is the fashion for enormous hairstyles, evoked in films such as Stanley Kubrick’s Barry Lyndon (1975) and echoed in the style of the tragic pop diva, Amy Winehouse.

In this illustrated talk Gillian Russell outlines the roots of the fashion in the 18th century. Rather than being a sign of excess and frivolity, high hair was a moment of historical significance which announced the emergence of the public woman as a force to be reckoned with.

The talk will explore what the cultural historian Grant McCracken describes as ‘the astonishing purpose’ women have found for their hair.

GILLIAN RUSSELL is an academic at the Australian National University, Canberra, who researches and teaches British 18th century and Romantic culture with a focus on theatre, sociability and gender.

This lecture is kindly supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection.

The extravaganza, or, The mountain head dress of 1776 (detail), [London], pub. by M Darly, 10 April 1776, The Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University


 

Study Day
The Delicate Art Of Deception : Revealing fakes and forgeries
Saturday 13 October 2012, 10 am – 4.30 pm, venue to be advised
$125 (including lunch box), full-time students $100 (including lunch box)

What’s in a name? with Eugene Barilo von Reisberg

In the first part of this introductory talk, Eugene Barilo von Reisberg draws a clear distinction between the terms ‘original’, ‘replica’, ‘version’, ‘copy’, ‘fake’, and ‘forgery’; while in the second part he reviews historical forgery cases from the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

EUGENE BARILO VON REISBERG is a Melbourne-based arts writer, curator, and blogger. Barilo von Reisberg’s research on Franz Xaver Winterhalter, a 19th century German portrait painter, is widely recognised, and he has contributed numerous articles and presented papers on the artist in Australia and internationally. He is currently pursuing a doctoral thesis on the artist at the University of Melbourne.

Giovanni Bastianini (1830-1868), Bust of Lucrezia Donati, ca 1865, marble, collection of Victoria & Albert Museum, London (originally sold as work by Mino da Fiesole (c.1428-1484), exposed as fake in 1868)

On Attribution with Robyn Sloggett

The process of authentication is one that aligns verifiable evidence with a particular hypothesis within a context that includes ambition, reputation, financial loss (or gain), market place position and legal implications. This lecture examines both the context and implications of attributing artwork, and the challenges involved in the process of attribution.

ROBYN SLOGGETT is Director of the Centre for Cultural Materials Conservation (CCMC) at the University of Melbourne, which delivers education and research programmes and one of Australia’s largest commercial conservation programmes. She has qualifications in Art History, Philosophy and Materials Conservation, and has published extensively on conservation, attribution and authentication.

in the style of Robert Motherwell (1915–1991), Elegy to the Spanish Republic series, reputed to have been created in 1953

Getting Under The Skin Of Furniture – what can we see? with Martin Purslow

This practical presentation will provide methods of technical examination of furniture, illustrating and offering some hands-on examples indicating the complexity in analysing and understanding pieces of furniture.

MARTIN PURSLOW, CEO, National Trust of Australia (Victoria) was former Director of the National Gallery of Scotland’s first ever outstation, the Paxton Trust. With a background in design and architectural history, he is an expert on Chippendale and Scottish Regency furniture.

Curvilinear design’ illustration from John Cloag, The Englishman’s Chair, George Allen & Unwin, London, 1964

Traps For The Collector Of Early English Glass with Bill Davis

This lecture will consider three characteristics of early English table glass, namely the material, its style, and its decoration, which attract faking and forging activities. The problem of honest reproductions being sold as originals, (becoming fakes), will also be discussed. Accounts of forgeries in museum collections will be included as well as examples from the lecturer’s collection.

WILLIAM (BILL) DAVIS has been a collector of early English glass for over 30 years and is advisor to The Johnston Collection in his area of interest.

illustration from Geoffrey Wills, The Country Life Collector’s Pocket Book of Glass, Country Life, London, 1966

A History Of The  Interest In Fakes And Forgeries with Alison Inglis

This lecture will take account of the various exhibitions on fakes from the 19th century to the present day and also survey the colourful literature – and touch upon the impact of various television programmes devoted to authenticating art and antiques, such as Antiques Roadshow.

ALISON INGLIS is an internationally recognised specialist in British 19th century art. She also has a research interest in Australian art museums and the history of collecting and display in this country. She is currently undertaking research on the circulation of works of art around the British Empire between 1850 and 1950.

Han van Meegeren (1889 – 1947), The Supper at Emmaus, 1936, collection of Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam

Examining Paintings: what can we be sure about? with John Payne

This presentation will look at the methods of technical examination of paintings, bringing forward some of the complexity in reading pictures.

JOHN PAYNE is the Senior Conservator of Painting at the National Gallery of Victoria and author of Framing the Nineteenth century (2007).

Fakes, Premature Ageing, Reproductions And Reattributions: when is an oriental carpet the ‘real’ thing? with Susan Scollay

A surprising number of the world’s leading museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, have collections of oriental carpets that include fakes. Many of these originated in the workshops of the Romanian master of ‘carpet forgery,’ Theodor Tuduc (1888 – 1983). This talk examines Tuduc’s legacy in the world of museum-based carpet collections and will also consider the associated process and ‘problem’ of reattribution.

SUSAN SCOLLAY is an independent art historian and curator specialising in Islamic art and culture. She is a contributing editor to HALI, the prestigious, London-based journal of carpet, textile and Islamic art. Scollay was guest curator of Fluid Borders: Ways of Seeing Oriental Rugs held at The Johnston Collection in 2010. Her recent curated exhibition, Love and Devotion: From Persia and Beyond closes at the State Library of Victoria in July and will be shown again at the Bodleian Library, University of Oxford, December 2012 to April 2013.

rug, Belgium, circa 1970’s, The Johnston Collection (A0026-1989)

Commanding Splendour Lecture Series

Resplendent In Their Dashing Uniforms: Men’s Fashions during the Napoleonic Era and Beyond with Eugene Barilo von Reisberg
Wednesday 10 October 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

In the aftermath of the French Revolution, men’s brightly-coloured suits with rich embroideries and lace gave way to more sombre outfits. The alternative penchant for military uniforms among the elite prompted a French diplomat, Count de Saint-Aulaire, to compare a court reception during the reign of Napoleon to a military review with ladies taking part.

Join the art historian and portraiture enthusiast Eugene Barilo von Reisberg, as he explores the changes in men’s fashions, and demonstrates the way in which the portraiture of the 18th and 19th centuries fuses the traditional representation of male virtues with notions of class and social standing.

EUGENE BARILO VON REISBERG is a Melbourne-based arts writer,
curator, and blogger. Barilo von Reisberg’s research on Franz Xaver
Winterhalter, a 19th century German portrait painter, is widely recognised, and he has contributed numerous articles and presented papers on the artist in Australia and internationally. He is currently pursuing a doctoral thesis on the artist at the University of Melbourne.

Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-1873), M. Edouard André (1833-1894) en Uniforme de la Garde Impériale, 1857, collection of the Musée Jacquemart-André, Paris
 

The Nude Napoleon: Neoclassism and the Memory of War with Shane Carmody
Wednesday 26 September 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

Antonio Canova’s Napoleon as Mars the Peacemaker strikes an unusual pose in the grand staircase of Apsley House. In this lecture Shane Carmody will tell the story of this heroic nude and indeed something of the place of classical nudity in the commemoration of Napoleon and Wellington.

SHANE CARMODY is Director Development at the State Library of Victoria, and holds degrees in History from the Universities of Melbourne and Toronto. Carmody has published articles on aspects of the Library’s collection and became interested in the neoclassical nude as war memorial whilst researching Sir Edgar Boehm’s St George and the Dragon on the Library forecourt.

Antonio Canova (1757-1822), Napoleon as Mars the Peacemaker, 1802/1806, collection of Apsley House, London

Buttoned Up: Oh it’s only buttons with Sally Buttons
Wednesday 12 September 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

This talk will consider buttons in the time of Charles Dickens. Sally “Buttons” will include regimental and civilian examples. She will discuss ‘plebeian and practical’ methods of manufacture and materials used. Size, positioning, number and the status gained by these aspects will also be considered. With Sally’s informative and informal approach there will be a wealth of anecdotes along the way.


SALLY “BUTTONS”, is a Cornishwoman and colourful antiquarian, noted for her eclectic knowledge. Past President of The Brighton Antique Collectors’ Club, French speaking, world travelled raconteuse, teacher, potter, weaver, silversmith and collector. Graduate of London and Deakin universities, marriage celebrant and for 25 years, a “button nut” who is always willing to share her passions.

A Real Brummagem Boy, published by GS (Gabriel Shear) Tregear (1802–1841), London

Percier and Fontaine and Josephine's Malmaison Commission with Amanda Dunsmore
Wednesday 29 August 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

In April 1799 Josephine Bonaparte signed the deeds to acquire Malmaison, her famous château and estate outside Paris. Six months later, Napoleon returned from his Egyptian campaign to discover the considerable debt now owing on Josephine’s rash purchase. Enchanted nevertheless, he paid it and quickly set about engaging two of the most fashionable young architects to remodel the ground floor interiors, creating some of the most sumptuous decorative schemes of the early Empire Period.

AMANDA DUNSMORE is Curator, International Decorative Arts & Antiquities at the National Gallery of Victoria. She has a background in Egyptology but now works largely in the field of decorative arts. Her research interests include 17th and 18th century English pottery, 18th century Neo-classicism and early 20th century design and the rise of modernism.

The dining room at Malmaison

Number One, London: A house for a hero with Linda Young
Wednesday 11 July 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

The Duke of Wellington, conqueror of Napoleon, established his London residence to launch his post-military political career. This talk reviews the relatively modest red brick house which was transformed in 1819 and 1828 as a suitable mansion for the hero. Furnished with magnificent gifts from grateful allies, and now a museum, the formal rooms remain in situ to celebrate his memory.

LINDA YOUNG is Senior Lecturer & Course Director in Cultural Heritage & Museum Studies at Deakin University, is writing a book on the history of historic houses as a species of museum.

Joseph Nash, The Waterloo Gallery at Apsley House, 1852

Lady Butler's ‘Waterloo’ with Ted Gott
Wednesday 4 July 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

It was the meticulous accuracy Lady Butler brought to her depictions of the Napoleonic, Afghan and Boer war campaigns that made her one of the most celebrated English military painters of the 19th century. Her painting, The 28th Regiment at Quatre Bras, records an heroic stand made by the British forces on 16 June 1815, near Quatre Bras in Belgium - part of the legendary Waterloo campaign against Napoleon’s French armies. Join Ted Gott as he explores this incredible painting.

TED GOTT is Senior Curator of International Art, National Gallery of Victoria. He has curated and co-curated numerous exhibitions, most recently Napoleon: Revolution to Empire (with Karine Huguenaud from the Fondation Napoléon), currently showing at the National Gallery of Victoria. He has published widely on British and French art.

Elizabeth Thompson, Lady Butler (1846-1933), The 28th Regiment at Quatre Bras, 1875, collection of National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, purchased, 1884

 

General Lectures

Samuel Johnson: More than a lexicographer with John Byrne
Tuesday 23 October 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

In this talk, John Byrne will introduce Dr Johnson’s (1709-1784), life and consider his place in English literature, and the reasons why he is considered such a towering intellectual figure. He will discuss his major works: A Dictionary of the English Language, The Plays of William Shakespeare, The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abissinia (Rasselas), Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets, and his journalism. Byrne will illustrate his lecture with a selection of important material from his internationally recognised library of Johnson’s works and Johnsoniana.


JOHN BYRNE is a retired solicitor and founding member of the Johnson Society of Australia. He is currently a Governor of Dr Johnson’s House, London, former President of The Johnson Society, (Lichfield), England (2008-9), former President of The Samuel Johnson Society of the West (USA ) (2008-9). He has been a Johnson Collector for over four decades and lectured widely in USA , UK and Australia.

Joshua Reynolds (1723 – 1792), Portrait of Samuel Johnson, 1775, collection of the National Portrait Gallery, London

The House Museum As Ancient Greek Palace:Travelling Through Time and Space at the Villa Kérylos with Bertrand Bourgeois
Wednesday 17 October 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

This talk will consider the Villa Kérylos, a house-museum on the French Riviera created in the ‘Belle Epoque’ and conceived by its owner (the banker Théodore Reinach) to be a reconstitution of an ancient Greek palace. It will show how both the architecture and the artefacts collected express the passion of an individual collector as well as allowing the visitor to travel through space and time.

BERTRAND BOURGEOIS is a lecturer at The University of Melbourne and is an expert in house-museums, having written a book entitled Poétique de la maison-musée (1847-1898) (Paris, L’Harmattan, 2007) focusing on real and fictional 19th century French house-museums.

The bedroom of Madame Reinach at Villa Kérylos

Caring For Your Collection: On metals with Holly Jones-Amin
Thursday 11 October 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

Storing and displaying metals – gold, silver, pewter and iron – the correct way is very important for their long-term care and preservation. With the proper care and storage, antiques can last for many more years. Join conservator Holly Jones-Amin to learn about the care and preservation of your metal objects. Examples will be provided and attendees are invited to bring along their own collection items for assessment.

HOLLY JONES-AMIN is Senior Objects Conservator at the Centre for Cultural Materials Conservation, The University of Melbourne, who specialises in metals conservation.

Alexander Johnston, England (fl. 1743 - ?), soup tureen, hallmarked London, 1755, gift of a private donor, The Johnston Collection (A1255–1989)

Spoon Fed: Thirty spoons & other stories with Sally “Buttons”
Wednesday 3 October 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

As a silversmith and eclectic collector, Sally “Buttons” shares her knowledge, to reveal the history and usage of the ubiquitous spoon. In this intimate conversation, Buttons will enlighten us about methods of manufacture and tell their tales through a number of spoons, made of silver and other materials, which will also be on view.

SALLY “BUTTONS” is a Cornishwoman and colourful antiquarian, noted for her eclectic knowledge. Past President of The Brighton Antique Collectors’ Club, French speaking, world travelled raconteuse, teacher, potter, weaver, silversmith and collector. Graduate of London and Deakin universities, marriage celebrant and for 25 years a ‘button nut’ who is always willing to share her passions.

maker unknown, London, England, seasoning spoons, hallmarked London 1764, Britannia standard, The Johnston Collection (A0826-1989)

The Jane Austen Series

An Officer And A Gentleman: War through the eyes of Jane Austen with Lise Rodgers
Thursday 18 October 2012, 2.00 pm to 3.30 pm, $30

Against a backdrop of England’s involvement in international conflicts, Jane Austen wrote about the people and places she knew. Accused by some critics of ignoring world events, in fact her novels and letters reveal a great deal about the way her world was influenced by war.

LISE RODGERS is an accomplished Melbourne actress whose career has spanned stage, screen and radio. An interest in the world and characters of Jane Austen, is the inspiration behind her series of ‘Jane’ performances.

Thomas Rowlandson (1756–1827), Portsmouth Point, 1811

The Perfect Happiness Of The Union: Marriage in Jane Austen’s Day with Margaret and John Leonard
Monday 9 July 2012, 10.15 am to 12.00 pm, $30

Why were women so keen, and men so disinclined, to marry in Regency days? This talk covers the customs of the day relating to courtship, engagement and marriage and looks at a woman’s life after marriage. Did the much-desired goal bring happiness and why did Jane Austen herself not marry?

MARGARET LEONARD was a French and English teacher and with JOHN LEONARD has diverse experience with the performing arts. They now delight in sharing their enthusiasm for literary classics through their dramatised readings.

untitled illus. for Chapter LIII, in Jane Austen, Emma, Macdonald Classics, London, 1974

Dickens 2012

Charles Dickens was born on 7 February 1812. In 2012, to celebrate 200 years since his birth, organisations worldwide are planning festivals, exhibitions and much more in honour of the most internationally acclaimed British novelist. The Johnston Collection is contributing to DICKENS 2012 with a year-long programme of activities to coincide with the bicentenary.
 

Dickens On Film: A Case of Great Expectations with Mark Nicholls
Thursday 4 October 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

Charles Dickens has been a virtual automatic ‘green light’ for any screen production throughout the history of entertainment cinema. With a particular emphasis on David Lean’s Great Expectations (1946), this talk will consider why Dickens’ work has found such a stimulating home on film and television.

MARK NICHOLLS is Senior Lecturer in Cinema Studies at the University of Melbourne where he has taught film and television since 1993. He is author of Scorsese’s Men: Melancholia and the Mob (Pluto/Indiana Uni Press) and Lost Objects of Desire: The Performances of Jeremy Irons (Berghahn). Mark’s work as a film critic, over the last twelve years, has included regular reviewing and commentary for ABC radio and television and between 2007 and 2009 he was author of The Age EG’s weekly film column, ‘Buff’s Choice.’ Mark is active as a theatre writer, director and producer.

Jean Simmons, Martita Hunt and Anthony Wager in David Lean’s 1946 Great Expectations. Photograph: Allstar

The Man Who Invented Christmas with Grace Moore
Thursday 25 October 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

Charles Dickens is famous for his representations of Christmas, particularly the redemption of the notorious miser, Ebenezer Scrooge. This talk will examine how Dickens built a private industry around the festive season, considering how and why the Victorian commercialisation of Christmas came about. In addition to A Christmas Carol Moore will discuss a number of his other Christmas books, including The Chimes, with its striking engravings by Daniel Maclise.

GRACE MOORE teaches Victorian literature and culture at the University of Melbourne. She is the author of a number of books, including Dickens and Empire (Ashgate, 2004), a student guide to A Christmas Carol (Insight, 2011) and, most recently, The Victorian Novel in Context (Continuum, 2012). She also has research interests in crime writing, neo-Victorianism and bushfires.

John Leech (illustrator), Mr. Fezziwig’s Ball, from Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol, Chapman and Hall, London, published 1843

Commemorative Ceramics with Robyn Ives
Wednesday 19 September 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

Ceramic objects have been used to commemorate royal anniversaries for centuries. This year, Queen Elizabeth II’s Diamond Jubilee will be celebrated with a variety of commemoratives, many of these lasting reminders made of pottery and porcelain. But when did this tradition begin and which other aspects of social, political and industrial history have been commemorated in ceramic form?

This lecture will provide the answers, revealing the earliest English ceramic commemoratives and illuminating those of the Georgian and Regency periods.

ROBYN IVES is a collector with a particular interest in Post Medieval English pottery, including Wedgwood and a lecturer on English ceramics from the 17th to the 20th century.

Jingdezhen, China, saucer (Arms of Liberty), circa 1770-75, porcelain,
polychrome enamel decoration, The Johnston Collection (A0364-1989

A W N Pugin in Australia with Tom Hazell
Tuesday 18 September 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30


Leading English architect, designer, and design theorist Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin (1812 –1852), is now best remembered for his work in the Gothic Revival style, particularly churches and the Palace of Westminster in London. Across Australia, from outback towns with tiny churches to our very greatest cathedrals, we have buildings directly influenced by Pugin’s ideas. In this lecture Hazell will look at not only the buildings, but also the decorative treatment of interiors and associated ecclesiastical objects.

This lecture coincides with the bicentenary of the birth of A W N Pugin (1812-1852), and Charles Dickens.

MR. THOMAS HAZELL AO , Deputy Chair of The WR Johnston Trust, has given numerous talks on the life and work of AWN Pugin, and his disciple, William Wardell, especially in relation to his influence in Australia. He is a Consultant, Heritage Church Restorations and Patron of various appeals.

John Rogers Herbert (1810 – 1890), Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin, 1845, collection of the Palace of Westminster, London

The Lives Of An 18th Century Man's Coat with Paola di Trocchio
Thursday 6 September 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

In the 18th century, clothing was an incredibly valuable form of currency traded across classes at second hand markets. Beverly Lemire writes, ‘Much of the value in garments was founded on the quality of the fabrics used in their construction, the weight, weave, finish and substance of the cloth, plus the presence or absence of braid, lace, buttons or accessories. A related but less tangible aspect was the element of style - cut, colour, pattern, form and texture – which added cachet to commodities sold in certain markets, with certain buyers, within a finite time frame.’*

This lecture will chart the transformations of a figured silk coat in the National Gallery of Victoria’s collection which was remade into a circa 1800 coat from a circa 1785 style, other remakes in the NGV collection, and the clothing trade, providing a study of material culture, self-representation and textiles and dress in the 18th century.

*Old Clothes, New Looks: Secondhand Fashion, p. 41, Oxford: Berg Publishers, 2004

PAOLA DI TROCCHIO is Assistant Curator, International Fashion and Textiles at the NGV, Melbourne. She has worked on numerous exhibitions that have recently included ManStyle, Lace in Fashion, Drape: classical mode to contemporary dress, Black in Fashion: Mourning to Night and Remaking Fashion. She has recently completed her MA at RMIT University on curatorial practice, which incorporated research from internships at the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

coat, circa 1800 (from a circa 1785 style), collection of the National Gallery of Victoria

Jacobean Elegance: The Lust for Luxury and Legitimacy with Ian George
Tuesday 4 September 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

The social upheavals of the 16th and 17th centuries in Britain brought many new families to the fore who acquired massive fortunes and a share of the vast estates made available by the dissolution of the monasteries. They rose into the ranks of the gentry and then the aristocracy. Because of Puritan influence, artists were no longer free to paint religious or biblical subjects. However they found eager patrons in the new families who wanted their portraits painted, as well as their new houses and animals.

The Montagu family, and the important portrait of the first Lord Montagu attributed to Robert Peake the Elder in The Johnston Collection, is a classic example.

BISHOP IAN GEORGE AO has been an art critic since 1960. His postgraduate work was in aesthetics. Since then he has served on the Visual Arts Committee of the Festival of Perth, as a Trustee of the Queensland Art Gallery and Vice-President of the Queensland Festival, had two terms on the Community Arts Board of the Australia Council and is a regular lecturer at the National Gallery of Australia, the Art Gallery of SA and the National Gallery of Victoria. In January this year he lectured there on William Blake’s illustrations to Dante’s The Inferno.

attributed to Robert Peake (circa 1551-1626), portrait of Edward Lord Montagu, 1st Lord Montagu of Boughton, 1601, The Johnston Collection (A0951 -1989)

The Sylvia Sagona Series

 

SYLVIA SAGONA is an internationally recognised specialist on 19th century French society. She retired from the French Department at the University of Melbourne to work on historical documentaries for French and Australian television and is currently researching a book on Parisian women in the 19th century and a French documentary on the history of the restaurant in Paris.

Orientalism: Napoleon and the Egyptian expedition
Wednesday 22 August 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

When Napoleon set out for Egypt with a ship full of artists, mathematicians, botanists and historians, it was clear there was more at stake than blocking the British trade route to India. Indeed, this expedition was the first major investigation of the East and led to the establishment of the Louvre, deciphering the Rosetta stone and a wave of Egyptomania in art and literature. At the age of 28 Napoleon was already much more than a soldier.

Antoine-Jean Gros (1771 – 1835), Bonaparte visiting the Pesthouse in Jaffa, 1804, collection of the Musée du Louvre, Paris

Fanny Burney & the Regency: Part Two
Thursday 16 August 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

This lecture will continue to follow Fanny Burney’s five years at the court of George III as they are now revealed in her recently published diaries. The court was a place of gossip and intrigue, but also of rigid propriety. How Burney coped and how she eventually escaped from her imprisonment there is a fascinating story.

George III and Queen Charlotte in Kew Gardens

Napoleon The Master of Spin
Wednesday 15 August 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

From the moment he burst onto the scene of the Revolution, the 26-year-old General Bonaparte groomed his evolving image and dictated every detail to awe-struck painters such as Ingres and David. In a time of great political instability he understood the power of visual propaganda and projected his message through architecture, fashion, the decorative arts and engineering feats. True or false or just plain fiction, the Napoleonic legend we have inherited is the one he dictated.

Jacques-Louis David (1748 –1825), The Coronation of Napoleon [detail], 1805, collection of the Musée du Louvre, Paris

The John Wiltshire Series

JOHN WILTSHIRE is a Professor in the School of Humanities at La Trobe University. He is the author of several books about Jane Austen, and has edited Mansfield Park for the authoritative Cambridge edition. His most recent books are The Cinematic Jane Austen (2009) and The Making of Dr Johnson (2009).
 

Fanny Burney & The Regency: Part One
Thursday 9 August 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

Fanny Burney spent five years at the court of George III – the years in which the King started to go mad. This lecture will explore what her recently published court diaries reveal about life there, and the King’s quarrels with his sons, both of them wild and dissolute. The eldest was destined to be Prince Regent.

Edward Burney (1760-1848), portrait of Fanny Burney, circa 1784-1785, collection of National Portrait Gallery, London

Jane Austen & The Regency
Thursday 2 August 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

Jane Austen’s novels were all published during the years of the Regency, which began officially in 1811. Though they are usually set in the country, there is plenty of reference to London in them. This lecture will explore Jane Austen’s attitudes to fashionable society and the ostentatious expenditure that was so characteristic of the Regency. Was Jane Austen really a ‘Regency novelist’?

 

The Secret History Of The Victorian Interior with Miles Lewis
Tuesday 7 August 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

This lecture will review the lesser-known aspects of Victorian decoration – handblocked papers and hessian linings, papier mâché, Rottman Strome embossed wallpapers, Keene’s cement and other imitation marbles, early fibrous plaster, and some enigmatic examples of stained glass.

MILES LEWIS is an architectural historian, emeritus professor in the Faculty of Architecture at the University of Melbourne; a UNESCO World Heritage Counsellor, editor and principal author of Architectura (London and New York 2008); author of Victorian Primitive, Don John of Balaclava, The Essential Maldon, Two Hundred Years of Concrete in Australia, Victorian Churches, Melbourne the City’s History, Suburban Backlash, and numerous articles and papers on architectural and building history.

‘a room finished in Rottman Strome & Co’s Japanese papers’, from The Journal of Decorative Art 1884, unpaginated plate.

From Rose Of Martinique To The Empress Josephine: A visual metamorphosis
Wednesday 1 August 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

When not on the battlefield fighting the combined might of Europe, Napoleon struggled at home to present a positive public image of the manipulative, often scandalous and self serving behaviour of his fashionable wife, Josephine de Beauharnais. His solution was to harness her style and export it to the courts of Europe. The portraits commissioned to sell the image, from languid chatelaine to imposing Empress, show the tensions in their relationship.

Jacques-Louis David (1748 –1825), The Coronation of Napoleon [detail], 1805,collection of the Musée du Louvre, Paris

Rare & Curious: The Secret History of Governor Macquarie’s Collectors’ Chest with Elizabeth Ellis
Thursday 26 July 2012 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

The Macquarie Collectors’ Chest is an antipodean cabinet of curiosities. It is associated with Australia’s longest serving 19th century governor, Lachlan Macquarie, and contains amazing arrays of preserved natural history specimens in hidden compartments covered by painted panels. Elizabeth will tell the story of the creation of the chest and its travels and return to Australia after languishing in a Scottish castle until the late 20th century.

ELIZABETH ELLIS OA M is the Emeritus Curator at the Mitchell Library in Sydney and a former Mitchell Librarian. Her publications include Rare & Curious about the Macquarie Collectors’ Chest and a biography of colonial artist Conrad Martens.

Macquarie Collectors’ Chest, Australian, circa 1818, reproduced courtesy of the Mitchell Library, Sydney

Representing The Revolutionary: Toussaint Louverture in Literature and Art with Charles Forsdick
Tuesday 24 July 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

Toussaint Louverture, the leader of the Haitian Revolution, is one of the few revolutionary figures to achieve the status of a truly global icon. Serving initially as an inspiration for poetry, fiction and art produced during the final years of his life, Toussaint has continued to provoke creative responses over the subsequent two centuries. This lecture will provide an introduction to this rich representational tradition with which the Haitian revolutionary is associated, focusing on his role at key historical moments as well as his posthumous deployment in major cultural and political movements, including abolitionism, the Harlem Renaissance and post-war decolonisation.

This lecture will be introduced by Deirdre Coleman who is the Robert Wallace Chair of English and Deputy Dean of the Faculty of Arts at the University of Melbourne.

CHARLES FORSDICK is James Barrow Professor of French at the University of Liverpool. He has published widely on exoticism, travel literature, postcolonial literature in French, the francophone dimensions of postcolonial theory, and the contemporary French novel. His book on representations of the Haitian revolutionary Toussaint Louverture will be published in 2012.

artist unknown, portrait of Toussaint Louverture, Haitian leader, collection of New York Public Library Archives

Awe-Inspiring Objects: Napoleon & the decorative arts                 Wednesday 18 July 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

The flagging luxury industries of lace, silk, porcelain, crystal and jewellery were revived by Napoleon’s return to extravagant Ancien Régime etiquette. Artisans such as Desmaltier, Odiot and Thomire designed exquisite objects which could be exported to the courts of Europe, showcasing France’s cultural superiority and the image of Napoleon. This lecture will explore the hidden messages in Imperial clocks, snuff boxes, tiaras and chandeliers.

Marie-Etienne Nitot, Paris, Cameo tiara (made for Empress Josephine), 1811, collection of the Swedish Royal Family.

Making Sense Of Robespierre with Peter McPhee
Tuesday 17 July 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

In September 1791 Maximilien Robespierre was carried from a final session of the National Assembly to shouts of ‘Long Live the Incorruptible!’ Less than three years later he was executed, and was reviled even more than he had once been adulated. How can we explain this abrupt reversal? He had been exposed as the dictator of ‘the Terror’, seeking to impose his obsession with ‘virtue’, or had he become a scapegoat for the actions of others? Or is there another explanation?

PETER McPHEE was appointed to a Personal Chair at the University of Melbourne in 1993 and was the University’s Provost in 2007-09. He has published widely on the history of modern France, most recently Living with the French Revolution (2006) and Robespierre: a revolutionary Life (2012). He is a recipient of the Order of Australia (2012) and a Centenary Medal (2003).

artist unknown, Robespierre, circa 1790, collection of the Musée Carnavalet, Paris

Vanity – thy name is not Jane Austen! with Lise Rodgers

Thursday 21 June 2012, 2.00 pm to 3.30 pm $30

‘Vanity working on weak heads produces all sorts of mischief’ – so wrote Jane Austen in Emma. Whilst definitely not having such a ‘weak head’ herself, Jane took much delight in pointing the finger at those of her characters who did - Sir Walter Elliot, Mr Collins, Mrs Norris – just to name a few. Let’s get acquainted with Jane’s less likeable characters!

LISE RODGERS is an accomplished Melbourne actress whose career has spanned stage, screen and radio. An interest in the world and characters of Jane Austen is the inspiration behind her series of ‘Jane’ performances.

Australia's Stained Glass: fine art, decorative art or just plain trade? with Bronwyn Hughes

Tuesday 19 June 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

Australia’s stained glass had humble beginnings as a small additional strand to plumbing, glazing and paper-hanging firms. Stained glass grew with the colony to become a significant ornament to permanent settlement, in Gothic Revival churches, stately homes and grand public buildings. This talk will focus on a selection of intriguing examples to be seen in and around Melbourne, and what they reveal about the architecture, economics and culture of their time.

BRONWYN HUGHES is an art historian specialising in stained glass and consultant to heritage architects and organisations. Since completing her PhD on Anglo-Australian stained glass artist, William Montgomery, she has been compiling and editing the first encyclopaedia of Australia’s stained glass makers and researching stained glass war memorials.

Welcome window at ‘Cliveden’, now in the Cliveden Room at the Hilton on the Park Hotel,Wellington Parade, East Melbourne

 

‘The Cruellest Remedy For Human Vanity’: Smallpox and the beautiful face in 18th century Europe with Michael Bennett

Wednesday 13 June 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

In 18th century Europe most people caught smallpox. It killed one in ten and left many survivors hideously disfigured, ‘turning the babe into a changeling at which its mother shuddered and making the eyes and cheeks of the betrothed maiden objects of horror to the lover.’ (T B Macaulay)

This talk considers the cultural history of smallpox, especially its perceived role as a scourge of vanity and destroyer of beauty. It likewise considers the attempts to manage smallpox through inoculation, initially with a mild form of smallpox and, later, with a cattle disease known as cowpox that reputedly protected the fair faces of dairymaids.

MICHAEL BENNETT is Professor of History at the University of Tasmania. The author of four books on late medieval and early Tudor England, he is currently writing a book on smallpox and the early global spread of vaccination in the 18th and early 19th centuries.

Baptiste Vanmour, Lady Mary Wortley Montague with her son Edward, circa 1717

Marie-Antoinette Of Spa Resorts: Empress Eugénie and the Search for an Imperial Identity with Eugene Barilo von Reisberg

Tuesday 5 June 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

Join Eugene Barilo von Reisberg for another adventure in royal iconography as he explores the hidden meanings and semantic connotations in portraits of Eugenie, Empress of the French (1826-1920), by Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-1873), and uncovers a secret language of visual symbolism in the details of dress, jewellery, and accessories that transmit messages of social status, imperial power, dynastic ambitions, and political aspirations.

EUGENE BARILO VON REISBERG is a Melbourne-based arts writer, curator, and blogger. His expertise on Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-1873), a 19th century German-born international court portraitist, is widely recognised, and he has contributed numerous articles and presented papers on the artist in Australia and internationally. He is currently pursuing a doctoral thesis on the artist at the University of Melbourne.

Franz Xaver Winterhalter, The Empress Eugenie Holding Louis Napoleon, the Prince Imperial on her Knees, 1857

Pride & Ornament Lecture Series

 

General Lectures

The Vanity Of Fashion with Roger Leong

Wednesday 30 May 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

For centuries, writers and commentators have warned against the vanity of fashion; generally to little effect. This talk spans the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries to discuss some of the ways women have accepted, embraced and endured extremes of clothing styles and, ultimately, physical pain and distortion in the pursuit of fashion.

ROGER LEONG is Curator International Fashion & Textiles at NGV Melbourne and has recently co-curated ManStyle. He has organised numerous exhibitions on historic and contemporary fashion ranging from the time of Jane Austen, The Ballets Russes of Serge Diaghilev to Shoes, hats and sneaker culture.

Adam Buck (1759-1833), Miss Hester Sarah Fry, England, 1802, (A0991-1989)

NEW Treasures of the Fondation Napoléon with Karine Huguenaud, Fondation Napoléon, Paris

Thursday 24 May 2012, 7.15 pm to 8.45 pm, $30

The exceptional collection of the Fondation Napoléon comprises memorabilia from the two empires, notably many luxurious objects once belonging to Napoleon I or to other members of the imperial family. The decorative arts are particularly well represented, with some of the most beautiful pieces ever made by the artists and craftsmen of the Napoleonic periods. This illustrated lecture takes a close look at various aspects of Fondation Napoléon, its mission and, especially, works of art in the collection.

KARINE HUGUENAUD is Chargée des Collections at the Fondation Napoléon in Paris and is co-curator of Napoleon: Revolution to Empire, Melbourne Winter Masterpieces 2012 which opens at the NGV on 2 June 2012.
This talk is presented at The Johnston Collection with the support of the Fondation Napoléon, Paris and the National Gallery of Victoria.

Manufacture de Sèvres
Vase fuseau au portrait de Napoléon en costume du Sacre d’après Gérard 1812
Paris, Fondation Napoléon, inv. 1165 (acquisition 2002)
© Fondation Napoléon – Patrice Maurin Berthier

The Mystery Of Love: Paintings and Poetry from India with Richard Runnels

Thursday 24 May 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

More than any other subject, love has inspired Indian poetry and painting. In their unique manner, poets and painters have given us personal renditions of that most elusive of human emotions.
Join Richard Runnels to look at stunning art works from the major Indian styles of the 16th through 19th centuries, and discover the words that so beautifully describe them.

RICHARD RUNNELS is the author of Indian Painters – British Masters Company Paintings from The Johnston Collection. He has lectured at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, National Gallery of Victoria and The Johnston Collection on topics as diverse as art, tea, architecture and food from India.

Krishna and Radha Dancing in the Moonlight, Kotah, 1840

Objects & The Theatre Of Memory with Valerie Krips

Tuesday 22 May 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

Proust’s Marcel remembers when he dips his madeleine in linden tea, the woman at the sink remembers her mother as she washes an inherited cup: objects and memory go together.
It’s no surprise, then, that museums have long been called theatres of memory. In this talk objects, some from The Johnston Collection, will open into memories as we think about the role museums and their objects play in the interaction of past and present today.


VALERIE KRIPS retired from the English Department, University of Pittsburgh, in 2006. She now lives in Melbourne, where she is a Fellow in the School of Culture and Communication at the University of Melbourne and a co-editor of Arena Magazine. Her research interests lie in cultural studies, and in particular heritage and memory.

Roman painting, Second Pompeian Style, from the House of Julia Felix in Pompeii

Summer In The Hills with Andrea Inglis

Thursday 17 May 2012, 7.15 pm to 8.45 pm $30

Andrea Inglis will discuss the development of the colonial hill station phenomenon as it emerged in Australia in the late 19th and early 20th century. In particular she will consider the hill station retreat at Mount Macedon.

ANDREA INGLIS has a background in teaching and is currently involved in educational research. She has an MA and PhD in social history. Her particular area of interest, and the subject of her theses, is recreation in the 19th century.

William Short, Mount Macedon 1894 – showing Braemar House in the background

Don't Waste A Wash: Hygiene and History with Valerie Krips

Wednesday 16 May 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

The TV advertisement ‘Don’t waste a wash’ assumed that everyone could be nice, clean and hygienic. But a daily shower and the use of deodorant are neither universal nor age-old, so how did people manage in earlier times? When did hygiene become a matter of serious concern in illness? These and other matters concerning hygiene, personal and public, are the topics for this talk about dirt, death, hygiene and the use of soap.

VALERIE KRIPS retired from the English Department, University of Pittsburgh, in 2006. She now lives in Melbourne, where she is a Fellow in the School of Culture and Communication at the University of Melbourne and a co-editor of Arena Magazine. Her research interests lie in cultural studies, and in particular heritage and memory.

Children washing in a tub

This lecture celebrates the centenary of the discovery of the greatest hoard of Elizabethan and Jacobean jewellery ever to be found.

The Cheapside Hoard: History revisited with Stephen Gallagher

Thursday 10 May 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

Drawing upon research carried out at the Museum of London, the V&A Museum and the British Museum, Gallagher will provide a detailed examination of this hoard - that lay undisturbed for some 300 years beneath one of London’s busiest streets – and the murky events surrounding its discovery. He will discuss how historical research informs his jewellery practice, and demonstrate the ways in which the past continues to be relevant to contemporary craft and design.

STEPHEN GALLAGHER is a Melbourne-based jeweller whose work is influenced by the Elizabethan era, and explores how research of historical material can inform contemporary practice. He has a BA in Gold & Silversmithing (Hons) and is a recipient of an Emerging Artist Mentorship in 2000 from Craft Victoria and an Ethel Oates Scholarship in 2001 from The Embroiderers Guild, Victoria. In 2008 he was awarded an Australian Arts Council - Skills and Arts Development London Studio to explore Elizabethan objects in situ. His work is represented in public and private collections around the country.

Stephen Gallagher, The Arcadian Hoard, 2009

Dickens 2012

Charles Dickens was born on 7 February 1812. In 2012, to celebrate 200 years since his birth, organisations worldwide are planning festivals, exhibitions and much more in honour of the most internationally acclaimed British novelist. 

The Johnston Collection is contributing to DICKENS 2012 with a year-long programme of activities to coincide with the bicentenary.

from Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop, first published as a novel in 1841

Beau Brummell, Dandyism And Neckclothitania with Clara Tuite

Wednesday 9 May 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

This lecture focuses on the sensational Regency figure of George ‘Beau’ Brummell (1778-1840), the original English dandy. Famous first for his ‘discovery’ of the neckcloth and clean white linen, in 1816 Brummell made a famed midnight Channel crossing to France to escape debts run up in London’s gambling hells. Living in Calais and then Caen, he became an exiled tourist attraction and finally a study in ruination.

CLARA TUITE is Senior Lecturer in English at the University of Melbourne. Her main research interests are British Romanticism, and 18th and 19th century literary and cultural history, with a focus on the Regency. She is currently completing a book entitled Proverbial Notorious: Lord Byron and the Rites of Scandalous Celebrity.

R H Cooke, ‘George Brummell in Caen’, Frontispiece, Vol I, Captain Jesse, The Life of George Brummell, Esq., commonly called Beau Brummell, 2 vols., London, 1844

VisitingThe Author: Writers’ House-Museums with Linda Young

Tuesday 8 May 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

English (and Scottish) literature-lovers began visiting their heroes’ homes and haunts in the early 19th century, and haven’t stopped yet. It was and is a romantic journey of admiration, loyalty and self-identification with characters, places and the creative genius of authors. The taste soon acquired a nationalist tinge as a celebration of English (or Scottish) cultural achievement, which by the later 19th century resonated throughout the British Empire. The three house museums dedicated to Charles Dickens tell the story.

LINDA YOUNG is Course Director in Cultural Heritage & Museum Studies at Deakin University in Burwood. She is writing a book about historic houses as a species of museum – among which, the houses of culture heroes such as writers are very prominent.

Dickens The Social Reformer with Elisabeth Neales and John and Margaret Leonard

Friday 13 April 2012, 10.15 am to 12.00 pm $30

This presentation shows that Charles Dickens was very critical of the social conditions and institutions of his time. In his novels, he exposed these conditions often by using humour and satire so that he would not alienate his readers.
The speaker will be Elisabeth Neales and the readers will be John and Margaret Leonard.

ELISABE TH NEALES is a graduate of Oxford University and has taught English and History in secondary schools in England and Australia. She is currently Secretary of the Dickens Fellowship Melbourne Branch.

John and Margaret Leonard have diverse experience in the performing arts and now delight in sharing their enthusiasm for literary classics through dramatised readings.

Dickens bust at Dickens’ birthplace, Portsmouth
photo credit | Roger Edwards

The Sylvia Sagona Series

Sylvia Sagona is an internationally recognised specialist on 19th century French society. She retired from the French Department at the University of Melbourne to work on historical documentaries for French and Australian television and is currently researching a book on Parisian women in the 19th century.

Taking His Name In Vain: Napoleon Bonaparte and his unruly sisters SOLD OUT phone 9416 2515 for waitlist

Wednesday 18 April 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

Napoleon used his three beautiful sisters as pawns in his power game, marrying them to his top generals and placing them on newly created thrones of Europe. But this avaricious, quarrelsome and disloyal trio with none of their brother’s talent, plotted to ruin his marriage, and, through their unbridled ambition, finally contributed to his downfall.

Antonio Canova, Pauline Borghese as Venus Vinctrix, 1804-1806, Borghese Gallery, Rome

Staging Power: The Paris of Napoleon Bonaparte SOLD OUT phone 9416 2515 for waitlist

Thursday 12 April 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

Napoleon, the master of spin and propaganda, used every art form to publicise his image of himself and his regime as he rose from General to Emperor. The city of Paris with its triumphal arches spoke of the glory of ancient Rome, while its plundered art treasures were intended to make it the museum capital of Europe. Even Notre Dame and the bridges over the Seine were altered to stage grandiose spectacles of power.

Jacques-Louis David, The Coronation of Napoleon, 1805–07 (exhibited 1808), Musée du Louvre, Paris

BOOK INDIVIDUALLY @ $30.00 OR ALL THREE
LECTURES TO RECEIVE A 10% DISCOUNT

Dickens & Children with Elisabeth Neales and John and Margaret Leonard

Friday 30 March 2012, 10.15 am to 12.00 pm $30

This presentation starts with a short discussion of Dickens’ own children and his relationship with them. This is followed by an account of the various children that Dickens portrays in the novels, including children of the middle class, cheeky urchins and children of the very poor.

The speaker will be Elisabeth Neales and John and Margaret Leonard will provide dramatised readings.

ELISABETH NEALES is a graduate of Oxford University and has taught English and History in secondary schools in England and Australia. She is currently Secretary of the Dickens Fellowship Melbourne Branch.

JOHN and MARGARET LEONARD have diverse experience in the performing arts and now delight in sharing their enthusiasm for literary classics through dramatised readings.

Horace Walpole's ‘Fastidious Pain’: Strawberry Hill and the Vanities of Collecting with Beornn McCarthy

Wednesday 2 May 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

The 4th Earl of Orford, Horace Walpole, was the owner of the neo-gothic manor Strawberry Hill. A fabulous icon of taste and extravagance, Strawberry Hill is a monument to 18th century fashion, and Walpole himself is a central character in any history of vanity. This lecture will introduce a famously eccentric collector, and guide its audience through the many exotic features, vain follies and foibles of Strawberry Hill.

BEORNN MCCARTHY has lectured and tutored in English Literature and Literary Theory at the University of Melbourne and Deakin University. His research spans the 18th and 19th centuries, and is focused on the relationship between literature and collecting in this period. A Masters Graduate, he is in the final stages of his PhD at the University of Melbourne, and is preparing a monograph on the life and letters of Isaac D’Israeli.


Horace Walpole’s likeness seen on a carving at Strawberry Hill after the unveiling of the restoration of the house on 23 September 2010.
photo credit | Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images Europe.

All In Vain: French Fashion from the Revolution to the Belle Époque

Wednesday 21 March 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

The Ancient Roman-inspired white muslin dresses of the French Revolution might look flimsy and vapid but they carried the weight of Republican principles of Liberty, Equality and Fraternity. Indeed, the changing role of women in 19th century French society can be gauged by the clothes they wore, from the prison of the corset, crinoline and bustle, to the shorter skirts and cycling pantaloons of the New Woman. Clothes do matter.

Jacques Tissot, Seaside (July: Speciman of a Portrait), 1878,
collection Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, Ohio

The Scottish Regency Furniture Of William Trotter with Martin Purslow

Tuesday 1 May 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30


The Edinburgh-based firm of William Trotter was one of the most significant workshops of cabinet makers in Regency Scotland. William Trotter (1772-1833) was born into a family of merchants and by 1809 he was sole proprietor of the firm Young & Trotter.
In 1814-15 Trotter furnished the library and picture gallery that the King’s architect and surveyor for Scotland, Robert Reid (1774 - 1856) had added to Paxton House for George Home. Trotter was regarded as perhaps the most eminent of all Scottish cabinet makers and rosewood was a timber which he worked regularly. Examples of Trotter furniture can also be seen at Government House, Hobart.

MARTIN PURSLOW, CEO, National Trust of Australia (Victoria) was former Director of the National Gallery of Scotland’s first ever outstation, the Paxton Trust. With a background in design and architectural history, he is an expert on Chippendale furniture and Scottish Regency furniture.

detail of Trotter furniture, Paxton House, England

‘Among The Shining Antique Marbles’: Grand Tourists responses to ancient sculpture in Rome with Lisa Beaven

Thursday 26 April 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

This lecture explores the sensibility that Grand Tourists brought to the experience of viewing ancient statues and the emotional responsiveness that emerged in this encounter. The vogue for looking at various sites and statues by moonlight and torchlight clearly reveals that many wanted to engage their imagination as well as their sight in their encounter with antiquity. Drawing on travel writings and travel accounts, the lecture reconstructs the 18th century Roman context for this viewing experience.

LISA BEAVEN is a lecturer in art history at La Trobe University. She has written widely on patronage and the history of collecting in 17th century Rome, and her book An Ardent Patron: Cardinal Camillo Massimo and his antiquarian and artistic circle in Rome was published in 2010.

While continuing to write about 17th century art collecting, she is also interested in travel and travel writing in early modern Europe.

Dying Gaul, Capitoline Museum, Rome

Mad Monks And Naughty Nuns: Figures of Monks and Nuns in English Porcelain with Matthew Martin

Tuesday 17 April 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

Many 18th century English porcelain factories produced figures representing members of Catholic religious orders. The function of these figures has never been entirely clear. This talk will examine some ideas about the reception of these figures, looking especially at the phenomenon of masquerade, and the existence of 18th century English Recusant art collectors.


MATTHEW MARTIN is Assistant Curator International Decorative Arts and Antiquities at the NGV. His research interests include 18th century porcelain sculpture and the role of Recusant elites as art collectors in 18th century England.

Chelsea porcelain factory, Nun, circa 1752-55, V&A Museum, London, C.205-1940

Scintillating Surfaces: mother-of-pearl and the decorative arts with Alison Inglis

Saturday 14 April 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

This paper will examine the use of shells (especially mother-of-pearl) in the decorative arts, both as a motif (as in still life painting), and as an ornamental material in its own right. Examples discussed will include shell grottoes, shell furniture and shell objets d’art.

ALISON INGLIS is an internationally recognised specialist in British 19th century art. She also has a research interest in Australian art museums and the history of collecting and display in this country. She is currently researching a book on the circulation of works of art around the British Empire between 1850-1950.

maker unknown, a group of six Victorian shell-work flower displays, late 19th century
photo credit | Christie’s, London, South Kensington

Mirror , Mirror On The Wall: Becoming Beautiful in 19th century Women’s Magazines with Michelle Smith

Wednesday 4 April 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

Girls’ and women’s magazines flourished in the 19th century, coinciding with the birth of print advertising and the emergence of department stores. Women eagerly consulted their pages to see the latest fashion plates and corsets, as well as advertisements for beauty products that promised to cure everything from freckles to frizzy hair. This lecture will discuss how these magazines show the birth of modern ideas of beauty but also caution girls and women on the perils of vanity.

MICHELLE SMITH is a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Melbourne who specialises in girls’ literature. She is the author of Empire in British Girls’ Literature and Culture: Imperial Girls, 1880-1915 and is currently working on a project comparing Australian, Canadian and New Zealand girls’ print culture from 1840-1940.

Prize Chignons from ‘The Horticultural’, Girl of the Period Miscellany, 1869.

Melbourne Food & Wine Festival 2012
We celebrate the Festival’s 20th anniversary in March 2012 with the addition of some other food-related talks alongside our official event.

Dining With Jane with Lise Rodgers

Thursday 22 March 2012, 2.00 pm to 3.30 pm $30

It is every woman’s dilemma. Guests for dinner – what to serve? For Jane Austen and the women of her time, it was no different. Searching for recipes, gathering ingredients, arranging the table, preparing the food, serving it up … Using cookbooks of the period and of course Jane’s letters, let’s explore the world of Regency food.

LISE RODGERS is an accomplished Melbourne actress whose career has spanned stage, screen and radio. An interest in the world and characters of Jane Austen is the inspiration behind her series of ‘Jane’ performances.

‘A plan of a typical course of nineteen dishes’ from Mrs Fraser, The Practice of Cookery, 1800

Food, Glorious Food with Margaret and John Leonard

Monday 19 March 2012, 10.15 am to 12.00 pm $30

This illustrated presentation deals not with recipes or cooking but with the food of the poor, usually on the streets of London in Dickens’ lifetime, the changes of diet due to the Industrial Revolution, the effect that these had on health, and a small part at the end which deals with Christmas. John gives readings from Dickens and Henry Mayhew.

MARGARET LEONARD was a French and English teacher and with JOHN LEONARD has diverse experience in the performing arts. They now delight in sharing their enthusiasm for literary classics through their dramatised readings.

from Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop, first published as a novel in 1841

Writing Your Family Story with Glenda Banks

Wednesday 28 March 2012, 10.15 am to 12.45 pm $30

With growing interest in genealogy there is a tendency to undervalue the lived history of our own generation. Each of us has a story to tell: how we have reacted to social
change, survived challenges or built on achievements. How do we mark our page in our continuing family story? This workshop provides insight into the process of writing creative nonfiction: building your data base, developing a framework, settling on a writing style, narrative construct and publishing options.

GLENDA BANKS has a PhD in historiographic metafiction and is the author of seven non-fiction books on contemporary social issues and a commissioned history of Australian health care accreditation. She has just completed a historical novel based on the experiences of Victoria’s mid-19th century goldfields women as described in found diaries, journals, family histories and site records.

Hidden From View: historic houses in the Western District landscape with Christine Reid

Thursday 8 March 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

An examination of the landscapes within the Western District and the siting of historic houses, with particular reference to the houses that will be visited on the upcoming Friends tour.

CHRISTINE REID, a Melbourne-based garden writer with a particular interest in garden history and cultural landscapes, contributes regularly to a wide range of Australian and international publications. With Professor Harriet Edquist, she is undertaking a major study of the cultural geography of western Victoria. When not travelling or visiting other people’s gardens, she likes to tend her own garden, rake and secateurs in hand.

This talk provides an introduction to The Friends of The Johnston Collection Western District tour in March 2012

Dalvui, Noorut

Gaming Gardens: Vanity and the Comte D’artois’ Bagatelle with Jennifer Milam

Wednesday 7 March 2012, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30

In 1777 the Comte d’Artois played a game with Marie-Antoinette. This youngest brother of Louis XVI bet his sister-in-law 100,000 livres that he could build a château complete with gardens in the time it would take for the Court to return from its annual sojourn at Fontainebleau. Although several of his fellow noblemen believed it was eminently absurd to attempt to achieve such an undertaking in six or seven weeks, Artois won the wager by completing his pleasure house in just 64 days, the prize helping little to defray building costs of over 3,000,000 livres. A spectacular example of how agonistic impulses gave rise to patronage in 18th century France, the case of Artois’s Bagatelle demonstrates the links between vanity and artistic culture in 18th century France.

JENNIFER MILAM is an Associate Professor in the Department of Art History at the University of Sydney. Her books include the Historical Dictionary of Rococo Art (2011), Fragonard’s Playful Paintings, Visual Games in Rococo Art (2006) and Women, Art and the Politics of Identity in 18th Century Europe (2003).

This lecture is supported by The Friends of The Johnston Collection.

Comte d’Artois’ Petite Maison, Jardin de Bagatelle, outside Paris

THE GARDEN OF IDEAS LECTURE SERIES

GARDENS IN 19TH CENTURY AUSTRALIAN LITERATURE & DIARIES with Sue Martin
Wednesday 24 August 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

Gardens feature in 19th century Australian writing in various ways – as proof and celebration of settlement, as a way of resisting the environment or a way of coming to terms with and incorporating it. This talk will consider these representations and their literary and symbolic meanings in fiction, but also in 19th century diaries, where descriptions of gardens and gardening sometimes serve different ends.

SUE MARTIN has published articles in The Victorian Naturalist and the prestigious journal Studies in the History of Gardens and Designed Landscapes. She is an Associate Professor in English at La Trobe University. Recently she co-authored Reading The Garden which looked at individual gardens, both public and private. This book illuminates the meaning and uses of gardens and gardening in Australia from white settlement to the late 20th century.

TEXTS IN GARDENS & WILD PLACES with Ian Marr
Wednesday 7 September 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

In this talk Ian Marr will consider the play and tradition of text in landscape – of prose, poetry and stray leaves from popular culture in gardens and wild places. The form draws on diverse practitioners, including William Shenstone, Ian Hamilton Finlay, Eric Gill and his web of influence, 19th century sign writing and copybooks, memorial arts, and contemporary thinking on typography and sign. In the Australian landscape, this language inhabits riverine and desert places with a physically enduring art of words and ideas.

IAN MARR is a painter and a letter-cutter in stone whose farm in southern New South Wales is becoming infused with inscriptional works escaping from the old garden into paddocks and waterways. His work is represented in public and private collections across Australia and internationally.

BOSTON IVY:  MELBOURNE & ITS GARDENS Paul Fox in conversation with Christine Reid & Denise Gadd
Wednesday 21 September 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

A conversation about Melbourne and its gardens: looking at the inheritance of ideas from botanic garden to suburban garden ... and where now for Melbourne gardens? Garden historian Dr Paul Fox talks with The Age garden editor Denise Gadd and Country Style garden editor Christine Reid.

DR PAUL FOX has written Clearings: Six Colonial Gardeners and their Landscapes. He has also been the recipient of the University of Melbourne’s Wettenhall prize for the best post-graduate thesis in Australian history. He is currently writing Travelling and Standing Still: How Australians See the World, as well as creating his own paradise garden in conjunction with a graphic design cooperative in Tehran.

EXPERIENCING THE BAROQUE GARDEN with David Marshall
Wednesday 12 October 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

In pursuit of the Baroque garden experience, this lecture takes a leisurely stroll through some of the finest Baroque gardens. It explores the way the Baroque garden constituted an ideal, courtly world while embodying royal or princely power. It explores the festivals that took place in them, the statues that animated them, and the illusions that made them an optical experience.

DAVID MARSHALL’S research interests focus on aspects of painting and architecture in 17th and 18th century Italy, especially architecture, depictions of architecture, and ruin and topographical painting (Codazzi, Panini, Canaletto). He also has research interests in garden design, antiquarianism, collecting and display and connoisseurship.

THE LUNGS OF PARIS: GARDENS OF THE SECOND EMPIRE with Sylvia Sagona
Wednesday 19 October 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

When Napoleon III swept to power in 1851 his first priority was to create a healthy and secure city out of the dark mediaeval labyrinth of central Paris. Nostalgically recalling his years of exile in London, Napoleon III dotted the city with ‘squares’, created whimsical gardens for the bourgeoisie and workers and showcased exotic species at the Serres d’Auteuil.

In this presentation we will examine the political and aesthetic ideas behind the idealistic greening of Paris and the images that have been left by the Impressionists and writers of the time.

SYLVIA SAGONA is an internationally recognised specialist on 19th century French society. She retired from the French Department at the University of Melbourne to work on historical documentaries for French and Australian television and is currently researching a book on Parisian women in the 19th century.

THE GARDEN OF IDEAS STUDY DAY 2

CONVENED BY RICHARD AITKEN

FAIR HALL & GLAD PARLOUR – BRINGING THE GARDEN INDOORS
Saturday 10 September 2011, 9.30am to 2.30pm, $80.00

CUT & DRIED: ARRANGING AUSTRALIAN PLANTS with Richard Aitken

The history of gardening with Australian plants is but imperfectly known, yet there is sufficient evidence to suggest that the incorporation of this distinctive flora in Australian homes and gardens was widespread from early colonial times. The history of floral art using Australian plants is even less well understood, yet recent research presented here suggests that flower arranging was a significant step in the wider public appreciation of Australian flora.

RICHARD AITKEN is a Melbourne-based architect, curator and historian. He has prepared conservation plans for many of Australia’s most significant historic gardens. His publications include The Garden of Ideas: four centuries of Australian style (2010), Botanical Riches (2006), Seeds of Change (2006), Gardenesque (2004), and The Oxford Companion to Australian Gardens (2002).


FAKING IT: ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS IN THE AUSTRALIAN INTERIOR with Elizabeth Anya-Petrivna

The making of flowers was a cultural fad, a leisure activity, and a home industry. The constellation of production, consumption, and design will be explored in the context of 1880s Melbourne and will plot the careers of local practitioners. This talk will look at the popular use of artificial flowers as decoration in 19th century interiors and fashion. It will question the cultural fascination with ‘sentimental botany’ to find negotiations or liaisons with interior decoration.

ELIZABETH ANYA -PETRIVNA is a Curator in the Collections Team of the National Trust of Australia (Victoria), whose responsibilities include the Trust’s outstanding costume collection. She is currently completing post-graduate study at RMIT University based on her innovative research and analysis of artificial flowers.


STILL LIFE: MODERNIST ART AND THE AUSTRALIAN INTERIOR with Gloria Strzelecki

Modernism of the early to mid-20th century was often introduced into the domestic setting through works of art, including floral art. Using the collections of Carrick Hill and works of artists who contributed to this rich legacy, domestic modernism is examined through the eyes of such figures as Edward Bawden, Adrian Feint, John Piper, and Stanley Spencer.

GLORIA STRZELECKI was the guest curator for the major retrospective on Kathleen Sauerbier: A modern pursuit held recently at Carrick Hill in South Australia and is currently gallery manager for Adelaide Central School of Art.

THE SYLVIA SAGONA SERIES

SYLVIA SAGONA is an internationally recognised specialist on 19th century French society. She retired from the French Department at the University of Melbourne to work on historical documentaries for French and Australian television and is currently researching a book on Parisian women in the 19th century.

DANGEROUS LIAISONS: THE COURTESANS OF THE REGENCY & THE SECOND EMPIRE
Thursday 18 August 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

While virtuous women were confined to a drab existence of home and hearth, their outrageous sisters of the night, under the elite patronage of the Gentlemen’s
Jockey Club in Paris and the Carlton Set in London, blazed a trail of diamonds and destruction through European aristocracy, influencing politics and art on the way.

BY POPULAR DEMAND

PARIS, CITY OF LIGHT: THE PETIT PALAIS COLLECTION AND THE UNIVERSAL EXHIBITION OF 1900 with Sylvia Sagona
Saturday 8 October 2011, 10.15am to 11.45 am, $30.00

The Petit Palais was built for the 1900 Universal Exhibition to showcase French culture and refinement. Its ornate jewel box structure soon attracted wealthy 19th century families who donated their collections. It is now a little known treasure trove of decorative arts from the Renaissance to the early 20th century as well as housing important collections of both Salon and Impressionist art.

This lecture will discuss the role of the great 1900 Exposition Universelle as a vehicle for the myth of Paris, City of Light.

THE JOHN WILTSHIRE SERIES

JOHN WILTSHIRE was a Professor at La Trobe University until his retirement in 2007. He is the author of several books about Jane Austen, and has edited Mansfield Park for the authoritative Cambridge edition. His most recent books are The Cinematic Jane Austen (2009) and The Making of Dr Johnson (2009).

IS PRIDE & PREJUDICE A ROMANTIC NOVEL?
Thursday 11 August 2011, 10.15am to 11.45 am, $30.00

Pride & Prejudice is unquestionably a novel about love. But does this make it a romantic novel? Many people think so, especially people who haven’t read it. The story of Elizabeth and Darcy is the story of two different kinds of love, though, and Pride & Prejudice is as much about money, class and family interference as it is about romance. This talk will focus on the treatment of love in this, very much loved, novel.

MRS BENNET’S NERVES: JANE AUSTEN & THE BODY, HEALTH & MEDICINE
Thursday 25 August 2011, 10.15am to 11.45 am, $30.00

Like her contemporary, King George III, Mrs Bennet complains of her ‘nerves’. She is one of many characters in Jane Austen’s novels who suffer from real, or possibly imagined, illnesses: Marianne Dashwood, Mrs Churchill, Mr Woodhouse, Mary Musgrove, and the Parker sisters in the unfinished novel Sanditon among them. This talk will discuss these characters along with medical practice in Jane Austen’s time.

WILLIAM JOHNSTON’S DERBY with Robyn Ives
Tuesday 30 August 2011, 10.15am to 11.45 am, $30.00

William Johnston loved flowers, a love visible in his collection of Derby porcelain. Urns swathed in floral garlands, picturesque landscapes, roses in bud and full bloom, all exquisitely hand-painted. Join Robyn Ives to explore William Johnston’s Derby and begin to understand his fascination for it.

ROBYN IVES is a collector with a particular interest in Post Medieval English pottery (including Wedgwood), and a lecturer on English ceramics from the 17th to the 20th century.

Royal Crown Derby Inkwell on Stand decorated by William Edward Mosley, circa 1925 (A0571-1989)

 

‘SO LIKE & BEAUTIFULLY PAINTED’: EARLY PORTRAITS OF QUEEN VICTORIA & PRINCE ALBERT BY FRANZ WINTERHALTER with Eugene Barilo von Reisberg
Thursday 1 September 2011, 10.15am to 11.45 am, $30.00

What do official royal portraits tell us? What messages do they communicate about the sitters – and from the sitters? This paper focuses on early official portraits of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert by Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-1873). It examines hidden meanings within Winterhalter’s early British royal portraits, and explores in particular the emphasis on Prince Albert’s newly-acquired ‘Englishness’ and the notion of a ‘gender reversal’ within the context of traditional marital portraiture.

EUGENE BARILO VON REISBERG is a Melbourne-based arts writer, curator, and blogger. His research on works by Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-1873) has gained international recognition, and he is currently working on a PhD thesis on the artist at the University of Melbourne, which investigates the iconographic construction of contemporary aristocratic ideal within Winterhalter’s portraits.

detail of Queen Victoria (1819-1901), 1843 ©HM Queen Elizabeth II (Windsor Castle)

CHIPPENDALE & THE PAXTON STYLE: THE INFLUENCE OF THE GENTLEMAN & CABINET- MAKER’S DIRECTOR with Martin Purslow
Tuesday 6 September 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

Thomas Chippendale rose from humble Yorkshire origins to supply new, integrated interior ‘styles’ to both the established aristocracy and by association in The Cabinet Maker’s Director, to the style conscious nouveaux-riche of the 18th century. Using images, several original 1750s plate engravings, and even a small piece of Cuban mahogany from his workshop, this talk looks at Chippendale’s design practice as illustrated by his seminal Director and his documented commissions, including Paxton House, Scotland where his designs reinforced the status, and aesthetic sensibilities of his client.

MARTIN PURSLOW, CEO, National Trust of Australia (Victoria) was former Director of the National Gallery of Scotland’s first ever outstation, Paxton House operated by the Paxton Trust. With a background in design and architectural history, antiques restoration and retail and heritage management, he is an expert on Chippendale furniture and Scottish Regency furniture.

‘The Dining Room’, Paxton House, Berwickshire, Scotland Decorated and furnished by Chippendale Haig & Co, 1774-6


 

CARE & PRESERVATION OF TEXTILES with Bronwyn Cosgrove
Wednesday 14 September 2011, 10.15am to 11.45 am, $30.00

Storing and displaying textiles the correct way is very important for their long-term care and preservation. With the proper care and storage, antique textiles can last for many more years. Join conservator Bronwyn Cosgrove to learn about the care and preservation of textiles. Examples will be provided and attendees are invited to bring along their own collection items for assessment.

BRONWYN COSGROVE is a Senior Conservator at the National Gallery of Victoria, specialising in textiles. Before arriving at the NGV in 2003, Bronwyn worked as a textile conservator at the Australian War Memorial, the Australian National Maritime Museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the National Gallery of Australia

CHARLES RYDER DROWNING IN HONEY: BRIDESHEAD REVISITED with Mark Nicholls
Thursday 15 September 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am

This lecture considers the enduringly popular 1980s television series, Brideshead Revisited and illustrates the way that the feminine and the maternal are represented in the series in architecture and places (Castle Howard, Oxford, Venice), key characters, and in the institution of the Roman Catholic Church itself. Brideshead Revisited is considered here as an Oedipus and the Sphinx encounter between Charles Ryder (Jeremy Irons) and a series of maternal surrogates ever-threatening to overwhelm him.

MARK NICHOLLS is Senior Lecturer in Cinema Studies at the University of Melbourne where he has taught film and television since 1993. He is author of Scorsese’s Men: Melancholia and the Mob (Pluto/Indiana Uni Press) and a forthcoming book on the films of Jeremy Irons. Nicholls’ work as a film critic has included regular reviewing and commentary for ABC radio and television and between 2007 and 2009 he was author of The Age EG’s weekly film column, ‘Buff’s Choice.’ Mark is active as a theatre writer, director and producer.

BEASTLY CRIMINALS & CRIMINAL BEASTS: STRAY WOMEN & STRAY DOGS IN OLIVER TWIST with Grace Moore
Tuesday 27 September 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

This talk will examine Dickens’s use of dogs in his novels. It will focus particularly on Oliver Twist and the extraordinary relationship between the criminal Bill Sikes, his mistress Nancy, and his dog Bull’s-eye, examining the ways in which taboo subjects and emotions are displaced onto the dog.

GRACE MOORE teaches at the University of Melbourne. She is a Dickens scholar with research interests in neo-Victorianism and, more recently, literary representations of bushfires. Her most recent book is the edited collection Pirates and Mutineers of the Nineteenth Century (Ashgate, 2011).

A SHARED LOVE: ELIZABETHAN DECORATIVE DEVICES IN GARDENS & TEXTILES with Stephen Gallagher
Tuesday 4 October 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

The invention of the Gutenberg printing press in around 1439 saw the spread of accessible decorative motifs for use by all forms of artisans. New combinations of decorative details were now used in interior and exterior decoration by metal smiths, painters, masons, ceramicists, embroiderers and garden designers. This talk will explore the relationships of the decorative arts to Elizabethan garden design and the impact of new world flora upon Elizabethan expression.

STEPHEN GALLAGHER is a Melbourne based artist, whose work is informed by the Elizabethan era, and uses contemporary materials to realise his designs. Gallagher received the Ethel Oates Scholarship 2001 from The Embroiderers Guild, Victoria which enabled him to study their Elizabethan embroideries in English collections. He is currently Curator at RMIT School of Art Galleries.

detail of a bodice said to be made for QEI, commissioned by Countess of Essex, Lettice Knollys

 

DICKENS & AUSTRALIA with Elisabeth Neales, John & Margaret Leonard
Friday 7 October 2011, 10.15 am to 12.00 pm, $30.00

Dickens himself never came to Australia but two of his sons and some of his characters did. This talk deals with the author’s distant perceptions of Australia and includes some moving letters home from convicts and settlers.

ELISABETH NEALES is a graduate of Oxford University and has taught English and History in secondary schools in England and Australia. She is currently Secretary of the Dickens Fellowship Melbourne Branch.

JOHN AND MARGARET LEONARD have diverse experience with the performing arts and now delight in sharing their enthusiasm for literary classics through dramatised readings.

NASMYTH, ALVA & MR JOHNSTON with Richard Aitken
(in conjunction with the AGHS)
Tuesday 11 October 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

Mr Johnston’s much-loved painting Alva House (circa 1830), attributed to Patrick Nasmyth, depicts the Scottish seat of James Johnstone, nestling into the Ochil Hills near Stirling. Purchased for its coincidental patrimony, this work abounds with other Australian links of which Johnston could not have been aware. Explore a rich heritage of Scottish landscape painting and gardening and the role of the emigrant landscape gardener in shaping the Australian countryside.

RICHARD AITKEN is a Melbourne-based architect, curator and historian. He has prepared conservation plans for many of Australia’s most significant historic gardens. His publications include The Garden of Ideas: four centuries of Australian style (2010), Botanical Riches (2006), Seeds of Change (2006), Gardenesque (2004), and The Oxford Companion to Australian Gardens (2002).

detail, Patrick Nasmyth (attrib.), Alva House, Stirlingshire, circa 1830s–40s (A0975-1989)

 

IN THE GARDEN WITH JANE AUSTEN with Lise Rodgers
Thursday 13 October 2011, 2.00 pm to 3.30 pm, $30.00

Jane Austen shared a love of gardening with her Mother and sister Cassandra, with her letters being often coloured by references to what’s in flower, what’s being planted etc. From the immediacy of her cottage garden to the grandeur of the grounds of Pemberley she leaves us with strong impressions of the garden style of the day.

LISE RODGERS is an accomplished Melbourne actress whose career has spanned stage, screen and radio. An interest in the world and characters of Jane Austen is the inspiration behind her series of Jane performances.

ORNATE EFFECTS: THE FAMOUS HUGUENOT DESIGNER, DANIEL MAROT with Robert Nash
Friday 21 October 2011, 10.15am to 11.45 am, $30.00

Trained at the court of Versailles, the refugee Daniel Marot was the most influential architect and designer in late 17th century Europe. His work ranged from architecture to gardens, interior design, silver, ceramics and furniture. He is credited with having disseminated the style of Louis XIV in England, and was official architect to William of Orange.

ROBERT NASH is Secretary of the Huguenot Society of Australia. A descendant of Huguenot silk weavers, he was educated at Oxford and Cambridge. Nash has published numerous historical articles on Australian Huguenot genealogy and descendants, and is the editor of the recent book, The Hidden Thread: Huguenot Families in Australia.

The State Bed from Melville House, V&A, London

BY POPULAR DEMAND

ROBERT ADAM TO REGENCY: NEOCLASSICISM IN BRITAIN with Christopher Menz
Thursday 18 August 2011, 7.15 pm - 8.45 pm, $30.00

The pursuit of neoclassicism during the second half of the 18th century developed in Europe was directly influenced by excavations carried out at Herculaneum and Pompeii from 1711 and 1733. The influence of the newly discovered ancient art and architecture on European design and architecture was vast. Robert Adam was the major British architect of the second half of the 18th century and was the seminal figure in the spread of neoclassical taste in Britain and Europe. Robert Adam,

CHRISTOPHER MENZ is a specialist in decorative arts and has published extensively on the subject. He has worked as curator at the National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Victoria and Art Gallery of South Australia. From 2005 to 2010 he was Director of the Art Gallery of South Australia.

Entrance hall, Syon House, London, early 1760s

THE SUSAN SCOLLAY SERIES

SUSAN SCOLLAY is an internationally recognised specialist in textiles and carpets, and Islamic art and culture. She is contributing editor of HALI, the London-based journal of carpet, textile and Islamic art, and is currently completing a PhD at La Trobe University, Melbourne. Scollay was guest curator of Fluid Borders: Ways of Seeing Oriental Rugs, and convenor of the accompanying Carpet Study Day, both held at The Johnston Collection in 2010.

DRACULA, DRAGONS & OTTOMAN PRAYER RUGS: HOW ORIENTAL CARPETS CAME TO DECORATE THE WALLS OF LUTHERAN CHURCHES IN TRANSYLVANIA & WHY THEY’RE STILL THERE TODAY
Tuesday 16 August 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

Transylvania, the northern most province of modern-day Romania, is home to the largest corpus of Turkish rugs and carpets outside the Islamic world. About 400 of these are preserved, and still used, on the walls of the Lutheran churches in the Carpathian Mountains – in the region made famous in the West by Bram Stoker’s 1897 novel, Dracula. The church rugs include many examples of the acknowledged ‘golden period’ of Ottoman Turkish art spanning the 300 years from the middle of the fifteenth to the middle of the 18th centuries. Among them, classical types such as the so-called Holbeins, Lottos and Oushaks hang side by side with prayer rugs and other textiles for the historic looms of Anatolia.

 

THE FLOWERING OF THE SHAWL: FROM THE GARDENS OF KASHMIR TO THE DRAWING ROOMS OF JANE AUSTEN’S ENGLAND
Tuesday 2 August 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

At the turn of the 19th century fashionable European women began to wear luxurious cashmere shawls imported from Mughal India. At first in France, then in England, these prestigious and exotic garments became so popular that local manufacturers began to make imitation Indian shawls in an effort to meet growing demand.

As Jane Austen’s novels attest, by the 1820s women from all walks of life were wearing some version of the shawl in the Indian Style. A few manufacturing centres such as the small town of Paisley in Scotland successfully marketed their shawls right through to the later years of the century when fashions changed and demand came to a sudden end.

 

THE SYLVIA SAGONA SERIES

SYLVIA SAGONA is an internationally recognised specialist on 19th century French society. She retired from the French Department at the University of Melbourne to work on historical documentaries for French and Australian television and is currently researching a book on Parisian women in the 19th century.


THE CONSOLATION OF AN EMPRESS: The Château de Malmaison gardens & collection
Thursday 7 July 2011, 10.15am to 11.45 am, $30.00

Always the master of self promotion, Napoleon bought Malmaison to showcase collections of the luxury trades, such as porcelain, gilt and cabinet making, which he had revived after the Revolution. After her divorce, Josephine devoted herself to her roses and botany collection, featuring Australian plants grown for the first time in Europe.

CORSETTED & COSSETTED: THE FRENCH BOURGEOIS WOMAN & THE VELVET PRISON OF THE BOUDOIR
Thursday 14 July 2011, 10.15am to 11.45 am, $30.00

With marriage and motherhood her only options, the innocent bride’s tightly policed upbringing led to neuroses which the medical profession then used to prove that she was unfit for education and public life. Her only confidants were her diary, piano and the pampered pets whose artificial lives mirrored her own. This lecture will explore the meaning behind the seemingly idyllic images of the art of the Salon and Impressionist painters.

THE ELEGANT ECCENTRIC: THE BEATRICE DE ROTHSCHILD-EPHRUSSI GARDENS & COLLECTION
Thursday 21 July 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00 Sold Out

Thursday 28 July 2011, 10.15am to 11.45am, $30.00 Places Available

Inheriting the wealth of two branches of the Rothschilds’ fortune, Beatrice could afford to travel with a suitcase full of wigs and construct a Renaissance/Moorish mansion amid seven themed gardens overlooking the deep blue of the Bay of Angels near Nice.

TO BE MISTRESS OF PEMBERLEY: REGENCY WOMEN AS WIVES & BUSINESS MANAGERS with Jennifer Forest
Thursday 4 August 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

It is very easy to view Regency marriages as merely the romantic endings of Jane Austen novels. To be mistress of Pemberley though, was indeed to be somebody. Exploring the lives of Regency women in the United Kingdom and Australia, this lecture will trace the experiences of women in their homes, the centre of the family business enterprise.

JENNIFER FOREST is the author of the best-selling Jane Austen’s Sewing Box, a unique combination of history, literature and artistic interpretation. She has worked in museums and taught history in secondary schools. Jennifer’s passion is fabric arts and crafts. She works in various media including needlework, felting, knitting and screen-printing.

FROM MINUSCULE TO METAPATTERN: FEATHERS, PETALS, POLLEN & THE IDEA OF THE SUBLIME with John Wolseley
Wednesday 10 August 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

Contemporary landscape artist John Wolseley will explore the relationship between the ‘landscape’ and the ‘landscaped’. He will discuss his recent work and his search to discover how we dwell and move within nature – a meditation on how the earth is a dynamic system of which we are all a part.

JOHN WOLSELEY was born in England and settled in Australia in 1976. His paintings and works on paper can be found in all state galleries and numerous public and private collections. The most recent publication on his work is Lines for Birds Barry Hill and John Wolseley Poems and Paintings, Perth, 2011.

THE GARDEN OF IDEAS: AN INTRODUCTION with Richard Aitken
Wednesday 6 July 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

The Garden of Ideas tells an inspiring and engaging story of Australian garden design beginning with the imaginings of emigrant garden-makers of the late-18th century. Central to this is the transfer of ideas, principally from England and Europe, but also from Asia, The Cape, Rio, and North America. Discover stories behind the works that comprise The Johnston Collection’s new exhibition, from early engravings and lithographs to mid-century books and photographs.

RICHARD AITKEN is a Melbourne-based architect, curator and historian. He has prepared conservation plans for many of Australia’s most significant historic gardens. His publications include The Garden of Ideas: four centuries of Australian style (2010), Botanical Riches (2006), Seeds of Change (2006), Gardenesque (2004), and The Oxford Companion to Australian Gardens (2002).

 

APPRECIATING OLD GARDENS: HISTORY OR ROMANCE? with James Broadbent
Wednesday 13 July 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

Every garden should be a continuation of the house it surrounds, and where the dwelling is old and sleepy the garden too must be drowsy and lie under the spell of ages wrote Norah Lindsay in Country Life in 1931. James Broadbent discusses this proposition.

JAMES BROADBENT is an eminent cultural historian whose working life has been devoted to historic buildings and gardens. He has a profound appreciation for plants which are appropriate historically and aesthetically, and which enhance the architectural elements.

WILLIAM KENT & THE ALLEGORICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF ROUSHAM HOUSE & STOWE with Gerard Vaughan
Wednesday 27 July 2011, 2.00 pm to 3.30 pm, $30.00.

Dr Gerard Vaughan will present a stimulating lecture on the 18th century landscape designer, William Kent, and the invention of a new landscape style: Rousham and Stowe.

DR GERARD VAUGHAN is Director of the National Gallery of Victoria and an art historian who wrote his doctoral thesis at Oxford on 18th century taste for the Antique. His research interests are particularly concerned with the history of taste and art collecting in the 18th century and 19th centuries, ranging from neo-classicism to post-impressionism.

THE GARDEN OF IDEAS STUDY DAY 1


CONVENED BY CHRISTINE REID

Saturday 9 July 2011, 9.30 am to 4.00 pm, $125.00 (inc lunch box)

CHRISTINE REID, a Melbourne-based garden writer with a particular interest in garden history and cultural landscapes, contributes regularly to a wide range of Australian and international publications. With Professor Harriet Edquist, she is undertaking a major study of the cultural geography of western Victoria. When not visiting other people’s gardens, she is rejuvenating a neglected garden in Kew.

THE GARDEN OF IDEAS – AN OVERVIEW: FINDING & RESEARCHING GARDENS with Richard Aitken

Gardens are repositories of ideas, but often their messages are muted or effaced through time and neglect. Understanding how to ‘read’ gardens—through an analysis of documentary research, an understanding of context, and the physical experience of reception— provides insights into this rich yet often overlooked cultural resource.

RICHARD AITKEN is a Melbourne-based architect, curator and historian. He has prepared conservation plans for many of Australia’s most significant historic gardens. His publications include The Garden of Ideas: four centuries of Australian style (2010), Botanical Riches (2006), Seeds of Change (2006), Gardenesque (2004), and The Oxford Companion to Australian Gardens (2002).


VANISHING SCULPTURES 1 with Terence Lane

Melbourne’s 19th century fathers enriched the city’s gardens and art gallery with copies of classical and neoclassical sculptures. Just what were these statues and why were they removed from public view? Terence Lane will reveal some surprising answers.

TERENCE LANE is one of the foremost authorities on Australian art of the nineteenth-century, a respected author and former senior curator at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.


VANISHING SCULPTURES 2: THE FLIGHT FROM SUBURBIA OR LEAVING FROM MOONEE PONDS with James Broadbent

A witty and provocative view of the suburban garden. James will challenge some long-held assumptions.

JAMES BROADBENT is an eminent cultural historian whose working life has been devoted to historic buildings and gardens. He has a profound appreciation for plants which are appropriate historically and aesthetically, and which enhance the architectural elements.


OLD WORLD/NEW WORLD: THE AUSTRALIAN GARDEN FROM THERE TO HERE

Through droughts and flooding rains, where to for the garden in 21st century Australia? A panel discussion led by Christine Reid and Richard Aitken, with Terence Lane, James Broadbent and Neil Robertson.

NEIL ROBERTSON has been involved in Australia’s Open Garden Scheme since 1988, and was one of the chief architects of its national expansion. He was the Scheme’s National Executive Officer from 1990 to 2010. He is a dedicated gardener - his own garden, Westport at New Gisborne, opens regularly for the Scheme - and when not armed with trowel and secateurs, he is to be found ensconced with a good book in his library.

TOYING WITH COSMOPOLITANISM: CHINOISERIE IN GARDEN DESIGN UNDER CATHERINE THE GREAT with Jennifer Milam
Friday 8 July 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

In 1771, Catherine the Great translated Chambers’ Designs of Chinese Buildings into Russian, which led to the creation of the largest complex of Chinoiserie in any 18th century European garden. Taking as its focus the gardens of Tsarskoe Selo, this talk explores the tensions between cosmopolitanism, exoticism and imperialism in Russian garden design under Catherine the Great.

JENNIFER MILAM is an Associate Professor in the Department of Art History at the University of Sydney. Her books include the Historical Dictionary of Rococo Art (2011), Fragonard’s Playful Paintings. Visual Games in Rococo Art (2006) and Women, Art and the Politics of Identity in Eighteenth-Century Europe (2003).

Vladimir Borovikovsky, Catherine the Great walking in the Gardens of Tsarskoe Selo, circa 1794

THE ANNETTE WELKAMP SERIES

ANNETTE WELKAMP is an arts and heritage consultant and Director of Cultural Connotations. In addition to working across Australia, she was formerly a Visual Arts Curator in the Groninger Museum in the Netherlands.

MEN O’ WAR, TULIPS & SOME VERY NAUGHTY CATS: THREE DUTCH PAINTINGS IN THE JOHNSTON COLLECTION
Wednesday 3 August 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

The Johnston Collection contains a small number of objects from the Netherlands, including three paintings. Their subjects range from a grand sea battle between the English and the Dutch in the manner of Abraham Storck (circa 1670), a dark still life of flowers from the circle of Jean Baptiste Monnoyer (circa 1720), to a rather chaotic cat fight taking place on a table laden with food, attributed to Melchior d’Hondecoeter (circa 1650). This lecture will explore the Dutch obsession with the sea, trade, bulbs and sideboards groaning with food, particularly as it is presented in paintings.

detail from dessert service Sir James Duke and Nephews, Hill Top Pottery, England, circa 1860-64

NOT QUITE THE GOLDEN AGE, BUT STILL RATHER GRAND: SOME DUTCH ARCHITECTURE & INTERIORS FROM 1750–1850
Tuesday 19 July 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

Despite its small size, the Netherlands undoubtedly became the centre of world trade during the 17th century. It was rich, powerful, innovative and influential. The 18th century witnessed a slow and slight decline in comparison, especially with rising competition from France and England. This lecture will take a tour of well-known and less familiar houses, palaces and other properties across the country, including Paleis het Loo (Arnhem), Fraeylemaborg (Slochteren) and Museum van Loon (Amsterdam).

detail from the Museum Willet-Holthuysen, Amsterdam

HALLMARKS, HISTORY & HESTER with Patrick Street
Tuesday 26 July 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

British hallmarks have acted as a safeguard to purchasers of silver articles for over 600 years. Hallmarking is still one of the most important forms of consumer protection. Hester Bateman (1708–1794), often called the ‘Queen of English Silversmiths’, was particularly interested in design and was well-placed to take advantage of the neo-classical style introduced by the architect Robert Adam. Her last mark was registered on 3 August 1787. This talk will consider the development of the hallmark alongside the eventful and innovative career of Bateman.

PATRICK STREET has been the Melbourne-based editor of The Silver Society of Australia Newsletter for more than six years. He has been collecting silver for more than 20 years and has a collection of English, French and Continental silverware. Mr Street retired as a Deputy Chief Magistrate of Victoria in 1999

OH, DO GROW UP… Childhood in England 1750–1850

AN EXHIBITION AND LECTURE SERIES TO COINCIDE WITH THE CENTENARY OF WILLIAM JOHNSTON’S BIRTH ON 8 JUNE 1911

Inventing Innocence with Michelle Smith
Wednesday 23 March 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

Children were not always imagined as innocent. This lecture explores how artists and writers created the idea of the Romantic child in the 18th century. It will compare how adults of the period pictured children, especially in literature written for children, with the experiences of actual boys and girls, many of whom did not enjoy the same period of ‘innocence’ as the children of wealthy families.

Dr Michelle Smith is an Australian Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow in the School of Culture and Communication at the University of Melbourne. She is the author of the book Empire in British Girls’ Literature and Culture: Imperial Girls, 1880-1915 and is currently researching colonial Australian girlhood.

The Child’s Book: Amusement Renders Knowledge More Palatable with Russell Oke in conversation with Angela Hesson
Wednesday 20 April 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

Children’s books are now a regular part of most children’s lives, but before 1744 there were few books designed for children. Oke will discuss the history and development of fourteen children’s book titles published between 1744 – 1844 including their authors, illustrators, publishers and production.

Russell Oke has a collection of over 5,500 books including a large section on history and children’s books. Oke has developed knowledge on books and their history over the years. He has researched books and their history for organisations, book dealers, individuals and deceased estates.

Angela Hesson is Assistant Curator at The Johnston Collection, and a former lecturer in Literary Studies at the University of Melbourne.

Not Entirely Child’s Play
Wednesday 30 March 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

The earliest recorded doll house dates from 1557–58 and was made for Duke Albrecht V of Bavaria. It was not for children, but a display house for himself. For the first three centuries of doll house history, they were largely novelties for adults, their survival preserving details of domestic architecture and interior design. From the middle of the 19th century onwards, they became the playthings of children, providing instruction in household management.


TWO LECTURES WITH LILA RAIT

Lila Rait is the author of Through the Nursery Window: A History of Antique and Collectable Dolls in Australia, 1788–1950. She has collected dolls and doll houses for more than 40 years and is regarded as one of the leading experts in Australia.

The History of Dolls in the Western World
Wednesday 25 May 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

This talk will examine the history of dolls in the western world from the earliest surviving Roman rag doll (1st century CE) to the 20th century. It illustrates the changing role of children in society and charts the rise and distribution of industrial production throughout the 18th and 19th centuries.


WILLIAM JOHNSTON CENTENARY LECTURE

Peter Piper, Peg Tops and Puzzles: Illustrated Books for Good Regency Children with Merete Colding Smith
Wednesday 15 June 2011 at 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

Before the mid-18th century there were very few illustrated books for children in England. The situation had changed by the end of the century. This talk will consider some of the illustrated books published for children between 1750 and 1850 from the Morgan Collection of Children’s Books at the University of Melbourne.

Merete Colding Smith (formerly Curator of Rare Books, The Baillieu Library, University of Melbourne) is undertaking a PhD and curated To all the Little Master and to all the Little Misses (1997).


THREE LECTURES WITH VALERIE KRIPS

Dr Valerie Krips is Associate Professor Emerita of the English Department of the University of Pittsburgh, and Honorary Fellow in the School of Culture and Communication at the University of Melbourne. She is the author of The Presence of the Past: Memory, History and Childhood in Postwar Britain, she is completing a book on cultural memory.


From Limbs of Satan to Innocent Lambs: The Creation of Childhood in Georgian and Regency England
Wednesday 13 April 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

The period 1750-1850 saw the rise of the idea of the child as an innocent dependant and of childhood as a distinct period of life to be cherished and remembered. This first talk in a series of three on the idea of childhood in Georgian and Regency England, focuses on the way in which the slow secularization of attitudes to children came into conflict with long-held beliefs in original sin. Beginning from the ‘sinful polluted creatures’ of Evangelical tracts, the child slowly came to be understood as ‘trailing clouds of glory’. The talk discusses this fascinating trajectory and its influence, then and now.

 

Pictures of Innocence: The Child in Painting and Literature
Wednesday 27 April 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

British portraitists played an important and early role in creating the idea of childhood innocence, as Joshua Reynolds’ famous The Age of Innocence (1788) attests. The image that Reynolds and other painters and sculptors of the period created was also to be found in a new literary form. Children’s literature, or books written specially for children began in 1743, with the publication of A Little Pretty Pocket-Book by John Newbery. This talk discusses the interaction of these ‘images’ of childhood, the role they played in their contemporary moment, and continue to play today.


The Governess: Fact and Fancy
Wednesday 4 May 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

Of all the figures associated with children in Georgian and Regency England, few carry more complex associations than the Governess. By turns too strict or too lenient (and even bawdy) her figure appears again and again in the literature of the period, and in the history of childhood of the time. This talk discusses her role in education, and also her more ambivalent role as a figure of imagination. Her status, in between the gentry she served and the servants who served them, and her role as stand-in for the parent provide, as we shall see, a rich canvas for contemporary imagination.

BOOK INDIVIDUALLY @ $30.00 OR ALL THREE LECTURES TO RECEIVE A 10% DISCOUNT.


Hard Labour: Childbirth in the time of Jane Austen with Cheryl Calwell
Wednesday 11 May 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

Calwell will discuss the birthing practices of the time, touching on the traditions around childbirth, the social and medical context, and the reasons why childbirth, in ‘at risk’ cases, was so dangerous to mother and baby, and why it is significantly safer today. The talk will make reference to the letters of Jane Austen and other sources for contemporary accounts.

Cheryl Calwell is a past President of the Jane Austen Society of Melbourne. She is a registered midwife, currently working in the field of Maternal and Child Health. She is also a Marriage Celebrant and hopes to develop and diversify her celebrancy career in retirement.

 

Horses for Courses: A Flying Gallop Around Nursery and Fairground with Patricia Mullins
Wednesday 1 June 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

This lecture will trace the evolution of the ride-on wooden horse, focusing on its development in 18th century England. What was ‘the flying gallop’? Approaches to conservation and restoration will also be explored, using examples from the carousels at the Melbourne Zoo, Luna Park and selected rocking horses, including the one included in the exhibition.

Patricia Mullins is the author of The Rocking Horse: A History of Moving Toy Horses, internationally acclaimed as the definitive history of the subject.  She is also well known in Australia as a children's book illustrator.. With over thirty years experience in wooden horse restoration work, in 1998 Patricia established Equus Art Pty Ltd, specialising in the fine restoration and conservation of carousel and rocking horses.

For Better, For Worse: Marriage in the World of Jane Austen with Lise Rodgers
Thursday 16 June 2011, 2.00 pm to 3.30 pm, $30.00

‘It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife’, wrote Jane Austen as the opening line to Pride & Prejudice. Marriage was frequently a ‘business’ affair rather than one of the heart, and a woman’s security could be dependent on her making a good match.

Lise Rodgers is an accomplished Melbourne actress whose career has spanned stage, screen and radio. An interest in the world and characters of Jane Austen is the inspiration behind her series of ‘Jane’ performances.

The Dear Departed: Children and the 19th Century Concept of Death with Sylvia Sagona
Wednesday 22 June 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

The development of medicine and the strengthening of family ties in the 19th century saw a new attitude to death emerge. The memory of the ‘departed’ was kept alive by every means, from séances to post mortem photography. Increasingly elaborate mourning rituals were defined, clothing and jewellery were designed, garden cemeteries were created where the dead could ‘sleep’, epitaphs were invented and the geography of the afterlife was redefined. This lecture will examine the Victorian cult of the dead in relation to children.

Sylvia Sagona is Fellow of the School of Languages at the University of Melbourne (Department of French and Italian Studies) and specialises in 19th Century French art and society.


Furniture Full of Pictorial Art: A Brief History of Pre-Raphaelite Furniture with Alison Inglis
Saturday 11 June 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

Alison Inglis will investigate the enthusiasm for Gothic Revival painted furniture in Britain during the mid–19th century. Her paper will focus on the work of the Pre-Raphaelite artists associated with the designers William Morris and William Burges. Why was this furniture so popular? What were the subjects depicted on the various cabinets, wardrobes and chairs? And how influential were these very distinctive works of decorative art?

Alison Inglis is an internationally recognised specialist in British 19th century art. She also has a research interest in Australian art museums and the history of collecting and display in this country. She is currently researching a book on the circulation of works of art around the British Empire between 1850 – 1950.


THE CHRISTOPHER MENZ SERIES

Christopher Menz is a specialist in decorative arts and has published extensively on the subject. He has worked as Curator at the National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Victoria and Art Gallery of South Australia. From 2005 to 2010 he was Director of the Art Gallery of South Australia.

Robert Adam to Regency: Neoclassicism in Britain
Tuesday 12 April 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00 SOLD OUT

Thursday 18 August 2011, 7.15 pm to 8.45 pm Places available

The pursuit of neoclassicism during the second half of the 18th century developed in Europe, directly influenced by excavations carried out at Herculaneum and Pompeii from 1738 and 1748 respectively. The influence of the newly discovered ancient art and architecture on European design and architecture was vast. Robert Adam was the major British architect of the second half of the 18th century and was the seminal figure in the spread of neoclassical taste in Britain and Europe.

Nineteenth Century British Decorative Arts: The Aesthetic Movement and Influences of Japan
Tuesday 24 May 2011, 10.15am to 11.45 am, $30.00

British design for the decorative arts during the second half of the 19th century underwent dramatic changes and was subject to reform in all areas. Eclectic sources were featured and designers drew inspiration from ancient and exotic cultures as well as Europe’s more recent past. The Aesthetic Movement, which drew on several sources, was largely influenced by the fashion for Japanese art and design. Two of the Movement’s most celebrated designers were Christopher Dresser and E W Godwin.

Worcester, Aesthetic teapot, 1882


COLLECTING PARIS SERIES
WITH SYLVIA SAGONA

Sylvia Sagona is Fellow of the School of Languages at the University of Melbourne (Department of French and Italian Studies) and specialises in 19th century French art and society.

Paris: City Of Light: The Petit Palais Collection and The Universal Exhibition of 1900
Thursday 24 March 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00 SOLD OUT

The Petit Palais was built for the 1900 Universal Exhibition to showcase French culture and refinement. Its ornate jewel box structure soon attracted wealthy 19th century families, who donated their collections. It is now a little-known treasure trove of decorative arts from the Renaissance to the early 20th century, housing important collections of both Salon and Impressionist art. This lecture will discuss the role of the great 1900 Exposition Universelle as a vehicle for the myth of Paris, City of Light.

BOOK INDIVIDUALLY @ $30.00 OR ALL THREE LECTURES TO RECEIVE A 10% DISCOUNT.


Marmottan
Thursday 17 March 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

Paul Marmottan, the dilettante son of a self made 19th century industrialist, was an avid collector of Napoleonic memorabilia and donated his collection to the Academy of Fine Arts. The charming Belle Époque mansion would benefit from numerous legacies of amazing diversity. Dr de Bellio, who was the doctor to Monet, Pissarro, Sisley and Renoir, donated his collection of impressionist art, which in turn inspired Monet’s son to bequeath his father’s collection. This lecture will explore these legacies, and discuss artistic philanthropy in 19th century Paris.

 

Cognacq-Jay
Thursday 10 March 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

The Musée Cognacq-Jay was established and donated to the city of Paris by the 19th century entrepreneur Théodore Cognacq and his former shop girl wife, Louise Jay, who jointly founded the landmark Parisian department store, the Samaritaine. The elegant Hotel Donon in the Marais houses an exceptional collection of fine and decorative arts which includes snuffboxes, jewels and furniture, as well as paintings by Fragonard, Boucher, Watteau and Tiepolo. Even more fascinating is the story behind the Samaritaine and how shopping was transformed into a vehicle for female emancipation

BY POPULAR DEMAND! The Wallace Collection with Sylvia Sagona
Saturday 9 April 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00 SOLD OUT

Displayed in the sumptuous London town house of the first four Marquesses of Hertford and Sir Richard Wallace, the Wallace Collection is a treasure trove of French painting, porcelain, gold boxes and furniture from the 18th century, as well as art work by Titian, Rembrandt, Hans Hals, Velasquez and English portraitists. It bears witness to the fascination that the French 18th century held for the British. We will explore both the house and the collection, as well as the fate of the now lost French Wallace Collection bequeathed to Lady Sackville.


Sylvia Sagona will also be presenting a further series of lectures in the second half of 2011 as well as The Dear Departed on Wednesday 22 June 2011. (See details below)


The Case of Pietro da Cortona: True or False in The Johnston Collection with Simona Albanese
Friday 20 May 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

Pietro da Cortona worked extensively in Rome during the 1630s and 1640s, when he depicted his most famous artwork The Triumph of Divine Providence for Cardinal Barberini between 1633 and 1639. This lecture will compare The Johnston Collection’s artwork to examples of the artist’s work of the same period in Rome, and attempt to establish if the work was produced by Cortona or one of his followers.

Simona Albanese completed her MA on Pietro da Cortona while working in several galleries in Rome. In New Zealand she has lectured and worked as curator, while in Australia she is currently carrying out research on Italian paintings in Australian collections.

 

On Watch Pockets, Fitted Boxes and Chatelaines... with Dr Genevieve Cummins
Tuesday 10 May 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

Complete chatelaines and fully fitted boxes with original or compatible contents have fascinated this speaker for decades. Following research on watch chatelaines, a further study has been undertaken on the manner of wearing watches. One interesting feature here has been the watch pocket – as part of an outfit, as an item to be worn, or for use at night. All these ideas will be covered in this talk.

Genevieve Cummins, a Sydney based Paediatric Surgeon, is the co-author with Nerylla Taunton, of Chatelaines: Utility to Glorious Extravagance (1994), and the author of Antique Boxes – Inside and Out (2005), and How the Watch was Worn: A Fashion for 500 Years (2010).

Toussaint L’Ouverture: Napoleon’s ‘Gilded African’ or Wordsworth’s Tragic ‘Chieftain’ with Deirdre Coleman
Thursday 28 April 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

In the mid-19th century the American abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison denounced the way in which slavery treated black people ‘as if they were not men, but automata or chattels’. In The Johnston Collection there is a French automaton clock representing Toussaint L’Ouverture, the hero of the Haitian revolution in the late 18th century. This lecture looks at a range of visual and textual representations of L’Ouverture, from the sympathetic British view of him as a hero, to the hostile French view of him as a traitor and buffoon.

Deirdre Coleman is the Robert Wallace Chair of English and Deputy Dean of the Faculty of Arts at the University of Melbourne. She is a specialist in the Romantic period and has published extensively on the abolitionist movement in the 18th century. She is also interested in early automata.

 

BY POPULAR DEMAND! Living With Antique Furniture with Michael and Ulrike Garwood
Tuesday 5 April 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00 SOLD OUT

Tuesday 19 April 2011, 10.15am to 11.45am, $30.00 Places Available

 

This workshop will present practical information about what to do and what not to do with antique furniture and wooden objects. Hands-on demonstrations (e.g. showing you how to clean and wax furniture) and discussions (with some examples presented illustrating common problems), will help inform you about how to care for and maintain the beauty and function of your antique furniture.

Michael Garwood and Ulrike Garwood are conservators of objects, especially wooden objects. Both are graduates of the British Antique Dealers Association programme at West Dean College in the UK, and subsequent internships in the Furniture Conservation Section of the Victoria & Albert Museum in London. They have worked in Melbourne for a number of years as conservators in private practice.

Tying The Knot: Marriage in Dickens with Elisabeth Neales and John & Margaret Leonard
Wednesday 6 April 2011, 10.15 am to 12.00 pm, $30.00

This talk investigates marriage in the life and writings of Charles Dickens. First dealing with the unhappy marriage of the novelist himself, Margaret and John Leonard will give dramatised readings of marriages that are portrayed in the novels themselves.

Elisabeth Neales is a graduate of Oxford University and has taught English and History in secondary schools in England and Australia. She is currently Secretary of the Dickens Fellowship, Melbourne Branch. John and Margaret Leonard have diverse experience with the performing arts and now delight in sharing their enthusiasm for literary classics through dramatised readings.


The Concept of Style with Tony Preston
Tuesday 29 March 2011, 10.15 am to 11.45 am, $30.00

‘Style’ can be two things - either the collective characteristics of an artistic expression, or that often elusive, intangible element that elevates an object in such a way that it completely transcends its company: put simply, we intuitively recognise it as palpably superior. A quixotic selection of man’s creative genius from 1500 BCE to the present will provoke discussion and debate about the concept of ‘style’, and this judge’s decision is not final - correspondence may be entered into on the day!

Tony Preston has extensive experience in the art world, both nationally and internationally, and was Chief Education Officer and Public Programmes Coordinator at the National Gallery of Victoria before establishing the new Christchurch Art Gallery in New Zealand in 2003, as its founding Director.

Discover Villas in the Western District with Timothy Hubbard
Wednesday 9 March 2011, 2.00 pm to 3.30 pm, $30.00

This talk provides an introduction to The Friends of The Johnston Collection Western District tour in April 2011

With imperial aspirations and some architectural pretension, for over fifty years Western District squatters established themselves in a vast pastoral landscape. Their homesteads were self-sufficient complexes supported by orchards, gardens and libraries. Situation and a sense of retreat were two further criteria for the villa lifestyle. The squatters claimed the landscape not only by occupation but also with the sophistication of their designs. These mostly Italianate villas were a Picturesque synthesis of style, form and function.

Timothy Hubbard is a consultant in the conservation of historic buildings, gardens, sites and landscapes. He is currently restoring Old St Andrews, the former Presbyterian Church and Manse at Port Fairy, where he now lives.


After Hours Series With Susan Scollay

Book individually @ $30.00 or all three lectures to receive a 10% discount

By popular demand!  In Praise of God: Islamic architecture and built form
Thursday 15 July 2010, 7.15 pm – 8.45 pm, $30.00

Many features and concepts of religious and secular architecture overlap in the Islamic world, yet the mosque is so central to the Islamic faith that this session will focus on its origins and development, using examples such as the Great Mosque at Qairouan in Tunisia, its counterparts in Cairo, Damascus, Ottoman Turkey and Mughal India.                                     


By popular demand!  Roses in Paradise : the role of gardens and garden culture in landscape, literature and decoration in the Islamic World
Saturday 14 August 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

Large and elaborate gardens were planted around the palaces of all the Islamic countries - from Spain right across to India and Central Asia. At the same time small gardens, shrubs and potted flowers graced the courtyards of more modest residences - reflecting the universal love of gardens and passion for flowers amongst Muslims. 


By popular demand!  Like Light from the Sun: Tiles and Ceramics in the Islamic World
Thursday 19 August 2010, 7.15 pm – 8.45 pm, $30.00

Highly decorative and sumptuously coloured tilework was the preferred means of embellishing Islamic architecture - both inside and out.  Its production was closely linked to ceramic vessels and tableware, and made use of designs similar to those used by metal workers, book illustrators and weavers.

The Susan Scollay Lecture Series

Susan Scollay is an internationally recognised specialist in textiles and carpets and Islamic art and culture. She is contributing editor of HALI, the London-based journal of carpet, textile and Islamic art, and is currently completing a PhD at La Trobe University, Melbourne

Book individually @ $30.00 or all four lectures to receive a 10% discount

1.  Carpet for Kings
Wednesday 7 July 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

The history and traditions of carpet weaving in Asia – and ways in which eastern carpets were introduced to Europe and European interiors.  This session will focus particularly on the court carpets of the great Islamic empires of the 14th to 19th centuries.


2.  Fatma’s Story 
Wednesday 14 July 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

Techniques and dyeing – a step-by-step outline of the way a carpet is made, and how this can vary from region to region. This session will focus particularly on urban and village carpet production. It will also consider the questions: what makes a ‘good’ rug, and what does a collector look for?


3.  Woven Gardens
Wednesday 21 July 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

Designs in oriental carpets – their origins and influences. The major design ‘families’ of oriental rugs and carpets based on geographic and visual differences. This session will look at designs across the whole spectrum of oriental carpet traditions: urban, village and tribal.


4.  Woven from the Heart
Wednesday 28 July 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

The concluding session will focus on carpet weaving in the nomadic traditions of Central Asia, Iran and Turkey. A highlight will be a series of photographs taken by the late Josephine Powell, who spent thirty years documenting the weaving and daily lives of eastern Anatolian nomads.

 

 

The Jane Austen Series

John Wiltshire begins our series with a set of three lectures.  Professor Wiltshire is the author of several books about Jane Austen, and has edited Mansfield Park for the authoritative Cambridge edition.  His most recent books are The Cinematic Jane Austen (2009) and The Making of Dr Johnson (2009)

Book individually @ $30.00 or all three lectures to receive a 10% discount

1.  Mr Darcy's Smile
Thursday 22 July 2010, 11.15 am – 12.45 am, $30.00

Perhaps the most important turning point in the relationship between Elizabeth Bennet and Mr Darcy in Pride and Prejudice occurs at a peculiar moment - when Elizabeth stands in front of Darcy’s portrait at Pemberley, and sees that he is smiling.  What does his smile mean, and why haven’t readers seen it before?  This talk explores this intriguing question.                        


2.  Mrs Bennet's Least Loved Daughter
Thursday 29 July 2010, 11.15 am – 12.45 am, $30,00

In Pride and Prejudice, Elizabeth Bennet severely criticises her father for his behaviour in the family, but we are never told what she thinks of her mother, whose influence is so much more powerful in the novel.  This talk explores the hints that Pride and Prejudice gives about the actual relationship between Mrs Bennet and her ‘least loved daughter’.


3.  The Bluestocking Ladies
Thursday 5 August 2010, 11.15 am – 12.45 am, $30.00

This talk introduces guests to a fascinating gallery of late 18th century ladies, who met at great houses in London for the purpose of intellectual and literary conversation.  Among them were Hannah More, Elizabeth Carter and Fanny Burney.  Dr Johnson praised their wit and learning, saying, ‘three such women are nowhere else to be found’.

 

Afternoon Tea with Jane Austen with Barbara Summerbell
Tuesday 3 August 2010, 2.00pm – 3.30pm, $30.00 Sold Out

Tuesday 10 August 2010, 2.00pm-3.30pm, $30.00 Places Available

Within Jane Austen’s Georgian world, hospitality was the framework which fuelled and oiled all social relationships.  Social occasions demanded attention to consumer items, be they fashionable clothing, fine china or a Pembroke table.  Join Barbara Summerbell in a conversation to explore the decorative arts within Jane Austen’s writings.

Barbara Summerbell, a Melbourne University graduate in literature and history, has researched the Regency world with particular reference to the nuances related to consumerism in Jane Austen’s writings.

The 3 R’s According to Jane – Reading, Writing & Romance
with Lise Rodgers

Thursday 12 August 2010, 10.15am – 11.45am, $30.00

Using letters written by Jane Austen to her sister and nieces, interspersed with passages from the novels, we gain much insight into Jane’s approach to both writing and matters of the heart.


Lise Rodgers is an accomplished Melbourne actress whose career has spanned stage, screen and radio.  An interest in the world and characters of Jane Austen is the inspiration behind her series of ‘Jane’ performances.

Elegant Dining in Jane Austen’s Time with Margaret Leonard
Tuesday 17 August 2010, 2.00pm – 3.30pm, $30.00

In Jane Austen’s day eating was quite a different experience from what we know today.  Meal times, the dining-table and even the dining room in middle and upper class homes would be quite strange to us.  The 18th century saw the beginnings of the Agrarian and Industrial Revolutions.  What happened to second-hand tea leaves and how a syllabub was made are some of the questions which will be answered.
Margaret Leonard was formerly a French and English teacher.  She is currently a member of the Jane Austen Society.


Jane Austen & The Country House with Linda Young
Wednesday 15 September 2010, 10.15am – 11.45am, $30.00

Jane was, like Elizabeth Bennett, a gentleman’s daughter – though poor, she was sufficiently genteel to have the entrée to a number of great families and their stately homes.  This talk traces some of her visits and her perceptions of fine houses, the people who inhabited them and the style in which they lived.
Dr Linda Young is a Senior Lecturer & Course Director in Cultural Heritage & Museum Studies at Deakin University.

A Series of Four Lectures with  Sylvia Sagona

Sylvia Sagona is a fellow of the School of languages at the University of Melbourne and specialises in 19th Century French art and society.

Book individually @ $30.00 or all three new lectures to receive a 10% discount

1.  The Wallace Collection:  Nostalgia for the Ancien Regime
Thursday 26 August, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00 Sold Out

Displayed in the sumptuous London town house of the first four Marquesses of Hertford and Sir Richard Wallace, the Wallace Collection is a treasure trove of French painting, porcelain, gold boxes, furniture from the 18th century and art work by world renowned artists.  This talk explores both the house and the collection as well as the fate of the now lost French Wallace Collection bequeathed to Lady Sackville.

2.  Dealing with The Scarlet Pimpernel:  Buckingham Palace and George IV’s Sèvres porcelain collection
Thursday 9 September 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

George V’s taste for the exotic, rare and extravagant produced what is considered the finest collection of Sèvres porcelain in the world. The sumptuous pieces formed glamorous accessories to the visual theatricality of his glittering receptions held at Carlton House. This lecture will explore the collection and the intriguing Chinese Regency style furniture and design brought from the Royal Pavilion at Brighton to Buckingham Palace to set off this display.

3.  Porcelain & Propaganda:  The Empress Josephine’s decorative arts collection at the Chateau de Malmaison
Thursday 23 September 2010, 10.15 am, - 11.45 am, $30.00

Napoleon Bonaparte was more fascinated by Josephine’s aristocratic network and exquisite taste than he was by her well rehearsed femininity and frivolous Creole charm.  Their home at Malmaison is a splendid example of the styles she would make famous.  Exported throughout her husband’s new Empire, her taste was adopted by all the courts of Europe.       

By popular demand! Power Dressing: Marie Antoinette and the fashion that brought down the Ancien Regime
Saturday 11 September 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00 Sold Out

Saturday9 October 2010, 10.15am - 11.45am, $30.00 Places Available

This lecture investigates the layers of social, cultural and political significance that lay beneath the seemingly frivolous changes in fashion instigated by Marie Antoinette from the time she arrived in Paris as a teenager, to her death on the scaffold.  Style does matter.                                                          
 

                                                                                                                                               

Further Lectures & Workshops

Workshop:  An Introduction to Georgian Glass with Bill Davis
Wednesday 25 August 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00 Sold Out

The invention of English glass of lead by George Ravenscroft in 1674 led to the establishment of the English table glass industry which became the envy of glass manufacturers throughout the industrialised world for over 200 years.  The much admired quality of this glass, its styles and decoration developed during the 18th century will be discussed and appreciated through handling of examples in a hands-on workshop environment.
Bill Davis is glass adviser to The Johnston Collection and a glass collector.

 

 


Buying Antiquities in 18th Century Rome and Naples with Gerard Vaughan
Thursday 2 September 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00
The Townley Collection of heavily restored Roman marbles at the British Museum is today largely ignored by the millions of visitors who flock to the British Museum to view its ‘primary’ collections of Greek and Roman antiquities.  But that was not the case in the 18th century when the Townley Collection was one of the most celebrated in Europe. This talk will throw light on Charles Townley’s activities in Rome and Naples at a key moment of classical revival in European taste and ideas.
Dr Gerard Vaughan is Director of the National Gallery of Victoria and an art historian with extensive experience within the international art and museum worlds.

Johan Zoffany, Charles Townley and his friends in the library of his house at 7 Park Street, Westminster, 1781-3, Townley Art Gallery & Museum, Burnley

 

 

 

  

 


English Commemorative Glass of the 18th and 19th Centuries with Bill Davis
Tuesday 7 September 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00
Throughout history, drinking glasses have been used to record important events. This lectures includes a brief introduction to English lead table glass of the 18th century, some events of historical significance recorded on glass of this period and discussion on the glasses themselves.
Bill Davis is glass adviser to The Johnston Collection and a glass collector.

 Three Lectures With Valerie Krips

Dr Valerie Krips is Associate Professor Emerita Department of English University of Pittsburgh and Honorary Fellow School of Culture & Communication University of Melbourne.

Book individually @ $30.00 or all three lectures to receive a 10% discount

The World of the Nursery: Childhood in The Country House
Tuesday 21 September 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00
What was childhood really like in the country house and how did it intersect with that of the children who lived nearby?  Who did or did not go to school?  Who were the wet-nurses, nursemaids and governesses and why did the parents of these children leave so much of their upbringing in the hands of servants?

With Her Face to the Wall: The Housemaid
Tuesday 28 September 2010, 10.15am – 11.45am, $30.00
The housemaid was the person who made the house comfortable for its inhabitants.  Yet of all the servants, she was the least thought of.  If she was seen in the day by any of those for whom she worked, she had to turn her face to the wall.  Who was she and what was it, exactly, that she did?

History in the House?
Thursday 7 October 2010, 10.15am – 11.45am, $30.00
Would it make a difference if all, or any, of the objects in The Johnston Collection were fakes or forgeries?  This talk discusses the question of ‘authenticity’ and what makes it so important.  What is the difference between a souvenir and an ‘important piece’?  What is a ‘new’ antique?  Is there, should there be, only ‘history’ in the house?


Georgiana McCrae:  Her Life in Miniatures with Caroline Clemente
Thursday 30 September 2010, 10.15am – 11.45am, $30.00

Georgiana McCrae was a fully trained miniature portraitist, banned by her husband’s family from practising professionally.  Many of her surviving works will be illustrated in this talk.  They reflect her remarkable story which opens in her father’s ducal family, her move to London with her husband and concludes with her pioneering life in early Melbourne.
Catherine Clemente is author of Australian Watercolours in the National Gallery of
Victoria 1802-1926, and the ‘Catalogue of Plates’ for Brenda Niall’s biography of Georgiana McCrae.

Portraits in Pottery: Portrait medallions and intaglio seals by Wedgwood and other potters with Ken Barnes
Tuesday 5 October 2010, 10.15am – 11.45am, $30.00

This lecture traces the development and interest in small ceramic portraits and likenesses as personal keepsakes or reminders of historical figures before the invention of photography, with emphasis on the contribution made by Josiah Wedgwood in the 18th century, along with other British and Continental potters.
Ken Barnes is a collector and lecturer with an extensive knowledge of black basalt and other forms of stoneware produced in the 18th and 19th centuries.


Timeless Tin Glaze: English Delftware with Robyn Ives
Tuesday 12 October 2010, 10.15am – 11.45am, $30.00

Tin-glazes were known in Mesopotamia about 1000BCE.  The technique was revived around the 9th century when potters in Iraq used tin to opacify lead glazes.  Over time the technique spread to Europe and into England.
Explore how the English created their unique English Delftware, discover the techniques and influences on production.
Robyn Ives is a collector and lecturer on English ceramics, with particular interest in Post Medieval English pottery; tin-glazed earthenware is a class within this field.

 

An Introduction to Clocks and Barometers and their Works with Fergus Forsyth

Wednesday 13 October 2010, 10.15am – 11.45am, $30.00
An historical overview of time-telling and its increasing importance to an expanding world, including information about barometers and their role in maritime exploration, concluding with some helpful advice about the care and setting up of your time piece or barometer.
Fergus Forsyth has a Diploma in conservation and Restoration of Antique clocks and has lived and worked in Australia for over 20 years.  He recently returned to working with clocks and barometers.

Workshop: How to Handle and Clean Ceramics with Penny Byrne
Tuesday 19 October 2010, 10.15am – 12.45pm, $30.00

Presenting practical information about what to do and what not to do with ceramics.  Practical, hands on demonstrations and discussion to help inform you about how to care for and maintain the beauty, function and value of your pieces.
Penny Byrne is a conservator of objects, especially ceramics.  She is based in Melbourne and works as a conservator and is a practising artist.


The Silkweavers of Spitalfields with Robert Nash
Friday 22 October 2010, 10.15 – 11.45am, $30.00 Sold Out

This talk will concentrate on the silkweaving industry of the East End of London which flourished in the 18th and early 19th centuries, and in particular on the role of Huguenot refugees and their descendants in that industry.
Robert Nash is Secretary of the Huguenot Society of Australia and editor of the book The Hidden Thread: Huguenot Families in Australia.

 

Oriental Carpet Study Day
Saturday 10 July 2010, 10 AM – 4PM

Includes morning and afternoon tea and light sandwich lunch.  Cost $110 per person.

PROGRAMME:

The Pazaryk Carpet:  Frozen in Time with Leigh Mackay, President of the Oriental Rug Society of NSW

The Trinitarius Carpet with Roger Leong, Curator, International Fashion and Textiles at the National Gallery of Victoria   

Oriental Carpets in Europe with Susan Scollay, internationally recognised specialist in textiles and carpets.                                                                                                                                                                        
Learning to See:  Encounters with Carpets with Elizabeth Cross, art historian, artist and independent curator

Book now by telephoning 03 9416 2515 or email us via our contact us page.


Staging Past & Present: Piranesi’s Rome with Mary Kisler
Thursday 24 June 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

A Venetian who spent most of his working life in Rome, Giovanni Battista Piranesi (1720–1778) developed a passion for Roman architecture. Archaeological ruins and sculptural fragments were constantly being uncovered, and he delighted in ‘re-constructing’ these, not only imagining how they would have looked when first built, but also creating fantastical structures of colossal proportions. Connoisseurs and critics applauded his architectural prints, but it was his poetic flights of fancy that had a major impact on the European visual imagination.

Mary Kisler is Mackelvie Curator International Art at Auckland Art Gallery and is an art historian with a particular interest in Renaissance and Baroque art.


Ceramics Conservation & Restoration: An illustrated talk with Penny Byrne
Thursday 17 June 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

Ceramics Conservation and Restoration is a highly skilled profession and in this illustrated lecture Penny will explain the processes and intricacies involved, and highlight some of the pitfalls to be avoided, including amusing anecdotes gleaned from over 15 years of practice as a freelance conservator/restorer.

Penny Byrne is a conservator of objects, especially ceramics. A graduate of the British Antique Dealers Association program at West Dean College in the UK, Penny is based in Melbourne and works as a conservator and is a practising artist.



The Embroiderers Guild, Victoria Lecture Series

In conjunction with The Embroiderers Guild, Victoria 50th Anniversary celebrations.

 

 


Embroidering with Mr Morris with Robert Reason
Wednesday 16 June 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00- SOLD OUT

Wednesday 16 June 2010, 2.00 pm - 3.30 pm, $30.00 - SOLD OUT

William Morris’ interest in embroidery was evident from the establishment of Morris & Co. in 1861 when he set about designing flowers that Jane Morris could embroider on curtains for Red House. Embroidery remained an integral part of the firm and due to the embroidering talents of the Barr Smith family in Adelaide, we can still savour the exceptional skill, beauty and design ethos of Morris from the collection of the Art Gallery of South Australia.

Robert Reason is the author of Morris & Co. Designs & Patterns (2003); Gladys Reynell (2006), and co-author of Empires & Splendour: The David Roche Collection (2008).



Birds, Beasts & Flowers... Discovering Asian symbols found in The Johnston Collection with Ruth Clemens
Thursday 10 June 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

Numerous Asian symbols are found in The Johnston Collection, from a variety of sources or categories such as mythology, nature, Daoism, Buddhism, puns derived from the homophonic Chinese language, and so on. Through various materials employed such as porcelain, lacquer and textiles, this talk will reveal different aspects of signs and symbols to be discovered.

Ruth Clemens is currently a Voluntary Guide at the National Gallery of Victoria with a special interest in Asian culture. She is a collector of and specialist in Chinese textiles.



Daughters of Victoria: Revolution, Refinement & Respectability with Vivien Caughley
Wednesday 2 June 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

During the Victorian era the craft of embroidery witnessed radical change in its materials and techniques, its makers, and especially its end-purposes. Much Victorian embroidery was created for domestic use to reflect the sanctity of the Home.

Vivien Caughley is a volunteer in Applied Arts at Auckland War Memorial Museum. Her work has been published in local, international and academic publications since 2005.


Hidden Beauties: Australian Needlework Samplers with Peg Fraser
Tuesday 11 May 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

During the Georgian and Regency periods, English girls produced needlework samplers of exquisite beauty and workmanship. Small wonder, then, that many people are disappointed in the simple, coarse samplers of their Australian cousins.

Peg Fraser professional historian completed her thesis on Australian samplers and invites you to explore the social history behind the humble Australian sampler and discover that the simplest objects can unlock the greatest stories.



Embroidered Flowers in the Military with Evangelia Erturk
Wednesday 19 May 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

This presentation will review Evangelia Erturk’s 40 years of experience and focus around the use of floral emblems in Australian military embroidery and the techniques used to create them.

Evangelia Erturk OAM is an internationally recognised master ceremonial embroiderer specialising in military embroidery, rank insignia, flags and banners.


 

The Midas Touch with Lesley Uren
Wednesday 5 May 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

Gold embroidery has been executed almost universally and is as old as the goldsmith or weaver. The history of this magnificent and rich tradition of embroidered embellishment will be discussed including the intricate making of the thread.
Lesley Uren is a recognised specialist in metal thread embroidery. She is a founder, and still active member of the EGV. She is currently completing embroidery for several major exhibitions to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of The Embroiderers Guild, Victoria in 2010.



Treasured Tools for the Embroiderer with Wendy Ritchie
Wednesday 24 March 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

Wendy Ritchie’s illustrated lecture will be based on her extensive collection of antique embroidery tools which has lead to an abiding interest in their history and the history of work that resulted from their use.

Wendy Ritchie has lectured widely on this topic and is the Curator of The Embroiderers Guild, Victoria Tools Collection.



What The Dickens: An introduction to Charles Dickens with Elisabeth Neales & readers, John & Margaret Leonard
Friday 28 May 2010, 2.00 pm – 3.30 pm, $30.00

This presentation includes biographical material and examination of five principal aspects of the novels copiously illustrated with dramatised readings from the texts.

Elisabeth Neales is a graduate of Oxford University and has taught English and History in secondary schools in England and Australia. She is currently Secretary of the Dickens Fellowship Melbourne Branch.
John and Margaret Leonard have diverse experience with the performing arts and now delight in sharing their enthusiasm for literary classics through dramatised readings.



Bess of Hardwick (1527-1608): Matriarch, Builder, Embroiderer with Dorothy Morgan

Morning Session: Wednesday 10 March 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00 SOLD OUT

Afternoon Session: Wednesday 10 March 2010, 2.00 pm – 3.30 pm, $30.00 PLACES AVAILABLE

In a time of political beheadings and imprisonments, Bess, or Elizabeth of Shrewsbury as she became, survived four husbands, bore eight children, built stately homes and a significant business empire and still found time to embroider. Discover more about this second most powerful woman of the Elizabethan period.

Dorothy Morgan, Guest Curator of Flowering Needles: Embroidery from Elizabeth to Victoria, is an honours history graduate of Melbourne University and a keen embroiderer.



EMPIRES & SPLENDOUR: aspects of the David Roche Collection with Martyn Cook

 

SOLD OUT

 

Wednesday 22 April 2009, 2.00 pm – 3.30 pm, $30.00

A lifetime spent collecting, David J K Roche has assembled a superb collection of 18th and 19th century English, French, Russian and German decorative arts.  The lecture Empires & Splendour is taken from the superb catalogue produced by the Art Gallery of South Australia for their exhibition celebrating the David Roche Collection held in Adelaide during 2008.  Highlights include magnificent Empire, Regency and Russian furniture, porcelain clocks and objects by renowned designers, cabinetmakers and manufacturers such as Chippendale, Thomas Hope, George Smith, Fabergé, Meissen, Worcester, Chelsea, Gardner and more.  A remarkable selection of treasures in this outstanding private collection will be revealed through this lavishly illustrated talk.

Martyn Cook, a fixture at the top end of the Australian antiques trade, has known Adelaide collector David Roche for some 25 years travelling the world for the D J K  Roche Foundation as commission agent.  Since 1982 Martyn Cook Antiques Sydney has specialised in the finest English and French furniture from the 18th and 19th centuries and the decorative arts.

A SERIES OF THREE LECTURES WITH SYLVIA SAGONA

1. CRINOLINE CRISIS:  the effect of women’s fashion on furniture and interior design in 19th century Paris
SOLD OUT

Tuesday 28 April 2009, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

In the mid 19th century the Empress Eugénie took advantage of newly developed steel under skirts to expand the crinoline to extraordinary proportions.  This move, designed originally to boost the French luxury goods trade, had repercussions not only on women’s health and her status as a decorative ornament, but on the design of furniture, the decor of rooms and the interior layout of the new mansions.  The Musée Galliéra in Paris houses a fascinating collection documenting the unexpected effects of the rise of the first great fashion industry.


2. DYNASTY:  the story of the ill-fated Camondo family and their collections
SOLD OUT

Tuesday 5 May 2009, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

The immense wealth of the Camondo Bank, founded in Istanbul, transferred to Italy and then to Paris at the time of Napoleon III, allowed the brothers, Count Moise and Count Isaac de Camondo to devote their lives to collecting 18th century decorative arts.  At their death, both collections were donated to the City of Paris and form the basis of the collection of the Museum of Decorative Arts.  At the centre of the frantic pace of the artistic circles in Paris, they persuaded other Jewish families of the Second Empire, such as the Fould, Cernuschi and Péreire to follow their philanthropic mission.  The Hotel de Camondo collection is particularly rich in silverware and china and stands as a poignant reminder of the dream of international culture.


3. THE LAST CONNOISSEUR:  the Calouste Gulbenkian Collection in Lisbon
SOLD OUT

Tuesday 12 May 2009, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

Born in Istanbul in 1869, this fascinating London educated, French speaking Armenian diplomat played a major role in the founding of the Royal Dutch/Shell, Iraq and Turkish Petroleum Companies at the time of the dismantling of the Ottoman Empire.  Moving seamlessly from one culture to another, he used his immense wealth to amass what is considered to be one of the greatest private collections in the world, now housed in Lisbon, Portugal, where he died. This all encompassing eclectic collection which we will investigate is particularly strong in Art Nouveau jewellery and glass, 19th century painting and Classical antiquities.


(Book individually or all three lectures for $85.00)

Sylvia Sagona is Fellow of the School of Languages at the University of Melbourne (Department of French, Italian and French Studies) and specialises in 19th century French art and society.

CONVERSATIONS WITH PORCELAIN COLLECTORS with Robyn Ives
Thursday 21 May 2009, 10.30 am – 12.00 pm, $30.00

How do porcelain collections begin?  Why do collectors pursue objects for their collections?  Learn the answers to these questions and more when Robyn Ives talks to collectors about their porcelain and discovers what drives their passion.

Robyn Ives is the Guest Curator for An Astonishing Revolution – Porcelain 1640-1840, Ceramics Advisor to The Johnston Collection and a former Vice-President of the Ceramics and Glass Circle of Australia.  She is a collector and lecturer who finds the philosophy of collecting and its interpretation fascinating.

THE FOUR AGES OF FURNITURE:  a walk in the Oak, Walnut, Mahogany and Satinwood forests with Ben Hodgetts
Wednesday 27 May 2009, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

In 1904 designer and furniture collector Percy Macquoid grouped English furniture into four distinct categories.  His four volume study A History of English Furniture created the ages of Oak, Walnut, Mahogany and Satinwood.  These convenient periods have been used ever since.  Why did these woods emerge as a handy classification system instead of the reigns of the monarchs?  Why do we still refer to them when it is easier to identify designers and makers?  Do these Ages still work today?  Based on his knowledge of The Johnston Collection, Hodgett’s will help us discover why these terms still matter.

Conservator Benjamin Hodgetts trained at the London College of Furniture (now the Guildhall University).  For over 25 years, he has undertaken numerous commissions to sympathetically restore furniture, both in the United Kingdom and in Australia, for government, museums, other public institutions and private clients.

TOURING THE ORIENT:   William Johnston, Orientalism and the Arts of the Islamic World
A series of four lectures with Susan Scollay

A continuing theme in the travels and collection of William Johnston is his pursuit of what has been described as the ‘Orientalist’ aesthetic.  In this series of four illustrated lectures, Susan Scollay will outline the origins of ‘Orientalism’, with its artistic and cultural references to the former European colonies in Islamic North Africa, the Levant and India.  Using WilIiam Johnston’s travels in Tunisia, Egypt and northern India as a starting point, the four lectures will provide an overview of the arts of the Islamic world, with particular reference to:

1. IN PRAISE OF GOD:  Islamic architecture and built form

Wednesday 10 June 2009, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

Many features and concepts of religious and secular architecture overlap in the Islamic world, yet the mosque is so central to the Islamic faith that this session will focus on its origins and development, using examples such as the Great Mosque at Qairouan in Tunisia, and its counterparts in Cairo, Damascus, Ottoman Turkey and Mughal India.  Palace life and architectural patronage will also be discussed.


2. ROSES IN PARADISE:  the role of gardens and garden culture in landscape, literature and decoration

Wednesday 17 June, 2009 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

Large and elaborate gardens were planted around the palaces of all the Islamic countries - from Spain right across to India and Central Asia. At the same time small gardens, shrubs and potted flowers graced the courtyards of more modest residences - reflecting the universal love of gardens and passion for flowers amongst Muslims. Garden themes were ubiquitous in Islamic poetry and dominated the design repertoire of all the arts and crafts.  


3. LIKE LIGHT FROM THE SUN:  tiles and other ceramics Wednesday 24 June, 2009, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

Highly decorative and sumptuously coloured tilework was the preferred means of embellishing Islamic architecture - both inside and out.   Its production was closely linked to ceramic vessels and tableware, and made use of designs similar to those used by metal workers, book illustrators and weavers.


4. SPUN FROM THE HEART; WOVEN FROM THE SOUL :   a hands-on introduction to oriental carpets 
Wednesday 1 July, 2009, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

Several of William Johnston’s own carpets will be used to demonstrate different weaving techniques used in the major carpet production areas.  Other means of identifying and dating carpets will be discussed - including dyes, pattern and changing production methods.


Book individually or  all four lectures for $115.00

Susan Scollay is an internationally recognised specialist in textiles and carpets, and Islamic art and culture.  She is a contributing editor of HALI, the London-based journal of carpet, textile and Islamic art, and is currently completing a PhD at La Trobe University, Melbourne

CONVERSATIONS WITH JANE AUSTEN with Barbara Summerbell
Tuesday 14 July 2009, 2.00 pm – 3.30 pm, $30.00

Within Jane Austen’s Georgian world, hospitality was the framework which fuelled and oiled all social relationships.  Social occasions demanded attention to consumer items, be they fashionable clothing, fine china or a Pembroke table.  Join Barbara Summerbell in a conversation to explore the decorative arts within Jane Austen’s writings. 

Barbara Summerbell, a Melbourne University graduate in literature and history, has researched the Regency world with particular reference to the nuances related to consumerism in Jane Austen’s writings.

CERAMICS FOR THE QUEEN – CREAMWARE & PATRONAGE with Robyn Ives
Wednesday 8 July 2009, 10.30 am – 12.00 pm, $30.00

Join Robyn Ives to explore the invention and development of creamware in the 18th century.  Learn how this ceramic body was fashioned into objects sought by royalty, the aristocracy and the middle class and discover the effect of patronage on its popularity.

Robyn Ives is the President of the Wedgwood Society in Australia.  She is a collector and lecturer with an extensive knowledge of Wedgwood of all periods and styles.  18th century Wedgwood comes within her particular interest in Post Medieval English pottery.

A SERIES OF FOUR LECTURES WITH PROFESSOR JOHN WILTSHIRE

1.  WHY DO WE READ JANE AUSTEN? 
Tuesday 4 August, 10.30 am – 12.00 pm, $30.00

Jane Austen’s novels make them, perhaps more than any other classics, resistant to translation into films.  This talk discusses the absence of the visual in her work, the continuous presence of an ironically-disposed narrator and her pervasive anti-romantic treatments and values.  The talk suggests that films bearing Jane Austen’s name turn this anti-romantic novelist back into a romantic novelist and that this is the source of their ongoing appeal.

Virginia Woolf once wrote that Jane Austen ‘should have laid a wreath on the grave of Fanny Burney’ – meaning that the younger novelist could not have written without Burney’s example.  The following talks show that there is much evidence of Austen’s affection for Burney’s books, but it goes on to suggest that they are radically different writers.

2.  JANE AUSTEN AND FANNY BURNEY
Tuesday 11 August, 10.30 am – 12.00 pm, $30.00

This talk shows that there is much evidence of Austen’s affection for Fanny Burney’s books but suggests they were radically different writers.  Burney combined the romantic novel with the comic novel and she is most at home in the city, whereas Austen is a novelist of country life.  Most importantly, Austen was a great artist and Burney, for all the vivacity and incident of her novels, was not. 


3.  FANNY BURNEY AND HER WORLD (PART 1)
Tuesday 18 August, 10.30 am – 12.00 pm, $30.00

Frances or ‘Fanny’ Burney lived from 1752-1840.  In 1778, she published her best selling novel Evelina.  Shortly afterwards she was persuaded to take up a place at court where she led five years of frustration and torture.  Escaping the court she fell in love with and boldly married the penniless Count d’Arblay.  She wrote Camilla to finance the house they built together.  Jane Austen was one of the subscribers to this novel.


4.  FANNY BURNEY AND HER WORLD (PART 2)
Tuesday 25 August, 10.30 am – 12.00 pm, $30.00

Burney’s life radically changed following her exile to France in 1802.  She endured a mastectomy of the right breast without anaesthetic in 1810, she witnessed the battle of Waterloo, and later in Bath, she nursed her dying husband, vividly recording all these events.  Burney’s journals offer fascinating personal insights into the period covered by The Johnston Collection.   


(Book individually or all four lectures for $115.00)

John Wiltshire was a Professor at La Trobe University until his retirement in 2007.  He is the author of several books about Jane Austen, and has edited Mansfield Park for the authoritative Cambridge edition.   His most recent book is The Cinematic Jane Austen (2009).

GETTING DRESSED WITH JANE AUSTEN with Lise Rodgers
Thursday 27 August, 2.00 pm – 3.30 pm, $30.00

Using the letters of Jane Austen, opinions of the day and some historical background, we delve into the world of Georgian fashion, by spending an hour or so getting dressed with Jane from the underwear to the outerwear and beyond.

Lise Rodgers is an accomplished Melbourne actress whose career has spanned stage, screen and radio. An interest in the world and characters of Jane Austen is the inspiration behind her series of “Jane” performances.

PORTRAIT OF A COLLECTOR:  John Twycross and The Melbourne Exhibition Collection with Charlotte Smith
Wednesday 7 October, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

The John Twycross 1880 Melbourne International Exhibition Collection comprises approximately 150 objects bought by wealthy wool merchant John Twycross at the 1880 Melbourne International Exhibition. Recently donated to Museum Victoria, the collection includes decorative, functional, and novelty objects and works of art. The collection provides a remarkable snapshot of late 19th century taste and style, which Dr Smith will explore in relation to the Melbourne International Exhibition.    

Dr Charlotte Smith is Senior Curator, Public Life & Institutions at Museum Victoria.  An historian with over 15 years experience working in museums and universities in England and Australia, Charlotte is particularly interested in museology and built heritage.

AFTERNOON TEA WITH JANE AUSTEN with Barbara Summerbell
Monday 19 October, 2.00 pm – 3.30 pm, $30.00

SOLD OUT

Within Jane Austen’s Georgian world, hospitality was the framework which fuelled and oiled all social relationships.  Social occasions demanded attention to consumer items, be they fashionable clothing, fine china or a Pembroke table.  Join Barbara Summerbell in a conversation to explore the decorative arts within Jane Austen’s writings.   

Barbara Summerbell, a Melbourne University graduate in literature and history, has researched the Regency world with particular reference to the nuances related to consumerism in Jane Austen’s writings.

THE ART OF THE CABINET with Matthew Martin
Thursday 3 September, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

Of all the productions of the European furniture tradition, the cabinet stands as the epitome of magnificent form and luxurious technique.  It has for centuries formed a central element in European cultures of collecting and display.  This talk explores the fascinating history of this marvellous furniture form and will be illustrated by examples drawn from The Johnston Collection as well as other Melbourne collections. 

Dr Matthew Martin is Assistant Curator - Decorative Arts & Antiquities at the NGV and is the recipient of The Copland Foundation Attingham Scholarship for 2009. He is co-curator of the forthcoming Chinoiserie exhibition at the NGV.

THE EDWARD LORD MONTAGU PORTRAIT AND ELIZABETHAN COSTUME with Roger Leong
Wednesday 14 October, 2.00 pm – 3.30 pm, $30.00

One of the challenges of studying dress from the Elizabethan period is the scarcity of extant garments. Of the magnificent clothes worn at the court of Elizabeth, nothing remains. There are however many securely dated paintings from which the developments of dress and its details can be established.
This talk will discuss the clothes worn by Edward Lord Montagu in his 1601 portrait and look at the broader context of men’s fashion in Elizabethan England.   

Roger Leong is Curator – International Fashion & Textiles at NGV Melbourne and has recently curated Persuasion: Fashion in the Age of Jane Austen. He has been responsible for numerous exhibitions on historic and contemporary fashion including The Ballets Russes of Serge Diaghilev.

AN ASTONISHING REVOLUTION - PORCELAIN 1640-1840

 

ends 24 July 2009

 

An Astonishing Revolution – Porcelain 1640-1840  is an exhibition of porcelain from private collectors, illustrating seven great moments in porcelain history. As well as the visual delights of the exhibition, superb images will take you on a journey of 200 years of ceramics production to discover the people behind the objects and the circumstances that influenced their manufacture.

 

Robyn Ives is Guest Curator for An Astonishing Revolution – Porcelain 1640-1840, and Ceramics Advisor to The Johnston Collection.  She is a collector and lecturer who explores the social, political, economic and technical influences on the manufacture of porcelain, as well as its aesthetic.
 
A minimum group booking of 8 is required for the Gallery Experience (maximum 16).

The cost is $144 per group of 8.

 

For individuals wanting to book into our Gallery Experience the following dates are currently available:
Monday 4 May 2009, 10.15 – 11.45 am and Thursday 16 July 2009 10.15 am – 11.45 am.

The cost is $22.00 Adult/$18.50 Concession.

 

 

THE HUGUENOTS OF THE WEST END AND SOHO with Robert Nash
Friday 23 October 2009, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

SOLD OUT

In the early 18th century, Soho and the surrounding areas of London were home to a rich cultural mix of various foreign craftsmen who produced an enormous variety of luxury goods for the English aristocracy and the emerging mercantile classes. Prominent among these were a large number of Huguenot refugees: French Protestants who had fled persecution in their native land. This talk will look at this refugee community and assess its considerable contribution to the artistic and cultural life of the British capital.   

Robert Nash is Secretary of the Huguenot Society of Australia. A descendant of Huguenot silk weavers, Nash was educated at Oxford and Cambridge. He has published numerous historical articles on Australian Huguenot genealogy and descendants

 

FROM CHAWTON TO PEMBERLEY:  A journey through the decorative arts with Jane Austen
5 August – 21 October 2009

 

Discover Georgian and Regency society through the writings of Jane Austen (1775-1817) and the fine and decorative arts objects used during her lifetime.
 
A minimum group booking of 4 is required for the Gallery Experience.


For individuals wanting to book into our Gallery Experience the following dates are currently available:
Thursday 13 August, Monday 7 September and Wednesday 14 October 2009.   Cost:  Adult $22.00 Concession $18.50 (inc. Seniors).

 

A Series of Five Lectures with Sylvia Sagona


Sylvia Sagona is a Fellow of the School of Languages at the University of Melbourne specialising in 19th Century French art and society.

 

Book individually at $30.00 or all five lectures to receive a 10% discount.

1.   Love, Pain & the Whole Damn Thing: Deciphering the Art of the Romantic Period (1800-1850)
Tuesday 9 March 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

The Romantic movement spread across Europe in response to the philosophy of Rousseau and emphasised man’s sensitivity, idealism and his connection with nature. This lecture will investigate how artists translated onto canvas the angst and drama of the themes of love, death and melancholy and how this vision still informs the way we perceive ‘True Love’ in the 21st century.

2.   Dying to Please: The Romantic Heroine of the mid 19th century
Tuesday 16 March 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30,00

The Romantic movement of the early 19th century idealised women provided they made themselves eternally unobtainable by retreat into a convent, madness or death. More beautiful and desirable in death than they ever were in life, these ethereal heroines haunted the art and literature of the early 19th century in both England and France. This lecture will investigate their creation and their legacy.

INTRODUCING TJC AFTER HOURS SERIES

3.   By Popular Demand  Power Dressing: Marie Antoinette & the fashion that brought down the Ancien Regime
Saturday 13 March 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am , $30.00

This lecture will investigate the layers of social, cultural and political significance that lay beneath the seemingly frivolous changes in fashion instigated by Marie Antoinette from the time she arrived in Paris as a teenager to her death on the scaffold. By presenting herself as an individual with outrageous coiffures, male outfits and peasant dresses, she flouted French royal traditions and was considered a traitor to her class and country. Style does matter.

4.   By Popular Demand  Dynasty: The story of the ill-fated Camondo family and their collections
Thursday 18 March 2010, 7.15 pm – 8.45 pm, $30.00

The immense wealth of the Camondo bank, founded in Istanbul, transferred to Italy and then to Paris at the time of Napoleon III, allowed the brothers, Count Moise and Count Isaac de Camondo to devote their lives to collecting 18th century decorative arts. At their death, both collections were donated to the City of Paris and form the basis of the collection of the Museum of Decorative Arts. At the centre of the frantic pace of the artistic circles in Paris, they persuaded other Jewish families of the Second Empire, such as the Fould, Cernuschi and Péreire, to follow their philanthropic mission.

Visions of Cathay: The West’s unending fascination with the East with Tony Preston
Tuesday 13 April 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

At its giddy height in the mid 18th century, the phenomenon of chinoiserie – the innumerable European notions of Eastern exoticism, based on ‘visions of Cathay’ was garnered from imported objets de vertu and often wildly unreliable travellers’ tales. This lecture will trace the fascinating waxing and waning of this fashion from the 15th century onwards.

Tony Preston has extensive experience in the art world, nationally and internationally and was Chief Education Officer and Public Programs Coordinator at the National Gallery of Victoria.



Period Rooms in Australian Museums: History & context with Alison Inglis
Tuesday 30 March 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

The lecture will examine the phenomenon of the ‘period room’ in Australian museums and its hey-day in the early twentieth century. Parallel developments in museum display in Europe and America will also be identified and the context for this exhibition practice – with its combination of fine art, decorative art and architectural design – explored through a series of case studies.

Alison Inglis is an internationally recognised specialist in British 19th century art. With a research interest in Australian art museums and the history of collecting and display in this country. She is currently researching a book on the circulation of works of art around the British Empire between 1850 –1950.



Wrapped in Silk & Gold: A History of Stumpwork with Alison Cole
Wednesday 7 April 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

An illustrated presentation on the history of Stumpwork, the stories behind the embroideries, the women that embroidered them and the common elements within the designs.

Alison Cole is an internationally recognised specialist in Stumpwork and Goldwork embroidery. She is the author of two books with a third in progress.



By Popular Demand  Crinoline Crisis: The effect of women’s fashion on furniture & interior design in 19th century Paris
Saturday 8 May 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

In the mid 19th century the Empress Eugénie took advantage of newly developed steel underskirts to expand the crinoline to extraordinary proportions. This move, designed originally to boost the French luxury goods trade, had repercussions not only on woman’s health and her status as a decorative ornament, but on the design of furniture, the décor of rooms and the interior layout of the new mansions.

Sylvia Sagona will also be presenting a further series of lectures in the second half of 2010.


Timeless Tin-Glaze: English Delftware with Robyn Ives
Wednesday 12 May 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

Tin-glazes were known in Mesopotamia about 1000BCE. The technique was revived around the 9th century, when potters in Iraq used tin to opacify lead glazes. Over time the technique spread to Europe and into England. Explore how the English created their unique English Delftware; discover the techniques, decoration and influences on production.

Robyn Ives is a collector and lecturer on English ceramics, with a particular interest in Post Medieval English pottery; tin-glazed earthenware is a class, within this field.



Flowering Needles: Embroidery from Elizabeth to Victoria
A superbly illustrated talk and exhibition: 9 March – 25 June 2010

Through embroideries from the 17th to 19th centuries, you can explore the history of this fascinating artform – the inspirations, the people, the techniques and its uses, many featuring lush flowers. Sourced through The Embroiderers Guild, Victoria in conjunction with the 50th Anniversary celebrations of The Embroiderers Guild, Victoria. This exhibition has been curated for The Johnston Collection by Dorothy Morgan.

To book the Gallery Experience on a date of your choice, a minimum group booking of 4 is preferred. For individuals wanting to book into our Gallery Experience the following dates are currently available:
Monday 22 March
Thursday 29 April
Wednesday 26 May
Friday 18 June 2010

Time: 10.15 am–11.45 am
Cost: Adult $22.00, Concession $18.50


A SERIES OF THREE LECTURES WITH DR VALERIE KRIPS

1. DASHING AWAY WITH THE SMOOTHING IRON:  A social history of the art of the laundry
Tuesday 15 September, 2.00 pm – 3.30 pm, $30.00

This talk takes us behind the scenes in the Victorian laundry, with a backward glance to the earlier smoothing stones of the Chinese and the Vikings.  What role did ironing play in the management of great houses?  What was and is the social importance of fine linen and draperies?  And what has any of this to do with Beatrix Potter’s Mrs Tiggy-Winkle?    

2. THE SECRET LIFE OF OBJECTS:  Merryweather’s Prognosticator and the Hand of Glory
Tuesday 22 September, 2.00 pm – 3.30 pm, $30.00

How does an object move from the kitchen to the display case in a museum?  What makes one thing a valuable antique and another a piece of rubbish?  This talk looks at the ways in which objects move from one position to another by looking at two remarkable pieces in a museum at Whitby, the birthplace of Captain Cook.     

3. REPRESENTING THE PAST:  Costumed guides in historic houses
Tuesday 29 September, 2.00 pm – 3.30 pm, $30.00

In many historic houses today costumed guides invite the visitor to enter a past period.  What are the advantages and disadvantages of this approach? Does it enable the visitor to better understand the past, or does it create a fictional account of it? 

(Book individually or all three lectures for $85.00)

Dr Valerie Krips is Associate Professor Emerita of the English Department of the University of Pittsburgh, and Fellow in the School of Culture and Communication at the University of Melbourne.  She has been a consultant to the Jorvik Viking Centre in York, Castle Howard in Yorkshire, and Shugborough in Staffordshire.  The author of The Presence of the Past:  Memory, History and Childhood in Postwar Britain, she is completing a book on cultural memory.

LIVING WITH ANTIQUE FURNITURE WORKSHOP with Michael Garwood
Thursday 17 September, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

This workshop will present practical information about what to do and what not to do with antique furniture and wooden objects.  It will show you how to clean and wax furniture and how to care for and maintain the beauty, function and value of your antique furniture. 

Michael Garwood and Ulrike Garwood are restorers and conservators of objects, especially wooden. Both are graduates of the British Antique Dealers Association program at West Dean College in the UK and subsequent internships in the Furniture Conservation Section of the Victoria & Albert Museum in London. They work in Melbourne as conservators and restorers in private practice.

THE TREE OF LIFE:  Textile Journeys East and West with Carol Cains
Thursday 10 September, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00

Illustrating the enduring appeal of the Tree of Life motif, three textiles from India, England and Italy will be discussed in the context of its varied and continued use in Asia and Europe, particularly in relation to its role in interior design.  Held in the NGV collection, these textiles have never been on display and will feature in Chinoiserie, an exhibition which opens at the NGV in October 2009. 

Carol Cains is Curator of Asian Art, National Gallery of Victoria. Initially trained as a textile conservator, she has an interest in textiles and costume. Cains has worked with Asian Art collections at the National Gallery of Australia and the NGV. She is co-curator of the forthcoming Chinoiserie exhibition at the NGV.

AN AFTERNOON WITH JANE AUSTEN with Lise Rodgers
Thursday 1 October, 2.00 pm – 3.30 pm, $30.00

Using the words of Jane Austen, and some opinions of the day, we gain an insight into daily life in Georgian England – but more particularly, how Jane herself might have spent her days.  

Lise Rodgers is an accomplished Melbourne actress whose career has spanned stage, screen and radio. An interest in the world and characters of Jane Austen, is the inspiration behind her series of “Jane” performances.

Jane Austen’s Sewing Box: Jane Austen’s women & their crafts with Jennifer Forest

Morning Session: Wednesday 21 April 2010, 10.15 am – 11.45 am, $30.00 SOLD OUT

Afternoon Session: Wednesday 21 April 2010, 2.00 pm – 3.30 pm, $30.00 PLACES AVAILABLE

An illustrated journey through the beautiful handiwork of the Regency Era. Drawing on the crafts worked by Jane Austen’s friends, family and characters in her novels, a range of skills from netting and knotting to tambour and white work will be explored.

Jennifer Forest is the author of the best-selling Jane Austen’s Sewing Box, a unique combination of history, literature and artistic interpretation. She works in various media including needlework, felting, knitting and screen-printing.



OLIVER EVERETT is Librarian Emeritus of the Royal Library, Windsor Castle. He was Librarian there and Assistant Keeper of the Royal Archives from 1985 to 2002. He wrote articles on the Royal Library, helped with several books on the Royal Collection, wrote the official guidebook on Windsor Castle, taught a history course on it and advised on a television series on it. 

He was in the British Diplomatic Service, 1967-78, including postings in India and Spain. He was Assistant Private Secretary to the Prince of Wales, 1978-80; and Private Secretary to Diana, Princess of Wales, 1981-83.

He lectures widely in Britain and abroad, including at the Victoria & Albert Museum, London; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Getty Museum, Los Angeles; and the New York Public Library. In Canada, at the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa; and the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto.  In Australia, at National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne and University of Melbourne; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney; Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane. And to art societies in Britain, France, Germany, Belgium, Holland, Spain and New Zealand; and also on cruise ships. 

He was educated at Cambridge University and did post-graduate work at Tufts University, Massachusetts; and at the London School of Economics.
 

KING GEORGE III | ‘the most cultured monarch’, art collector, friend of America and family man
Thursday 26 October 2017 | 2.00 pm to 3.30 pm

George III is unjustly remembered solely as having been mad and having lost the American colonies. This lecture corrects this impression. He was a discerning art collector, patron of the arts and artists, friend of America and Americans, and a committed family man. He was also a keen architect who added the future Buckingham Palace to the Royal residences, and re-inhabited Windsor Castle. 

This lecture describes his life, family and wide interests, his patronage of the arts, his important additions to the Royal Collection and his relationship with North America and Americans.

King George III - portrait painted on the occasion of his Coronation
Sir Allan Ramsay, (English, 1713-84), George III (1738-1820), circa 1761-2, The Royal Collection, England, RCIN 405307, Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2017 | Public Domain

LEARN | EXCLUSIVE MASTERCLASS |
THE ROYAL COLLECTORS  with OLIVER EVERETT

BUCKINGHAM PALACE | its history, occupants and contents
Tuesday 24 October 2017 | 2.00 pm to 3.30 pm

How the building developed from a modest Georgian house to the present Palace; from King George III's purchase of a family home in 1762 to the creation of a stunning palace by King George IV and John Nash in the 1820s; to the royal residence used by Queen Victoria and monarchs ever since as the centre of British Court life and the glittering setting for thousands of official functions and State visits.

The Palace also contains hundreds of art treasures from the Royal Collection, including world famous paintings, furniture, sculpture, porcelain, clocks and other objects.

Buckingham Palace, aerial view with the Queen Victoria Memorial in the foreground; the East Front; the internal quadrangle and Grand Entrance; and the garden behind

 
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